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Full text of "Annual reports"

MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, MA 



3 1848 00202 0035 




ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TOWN 

OFFICES 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 3 1 . 2000 



.Ill 



350" ANNIVERSARY QUILT 



1 he theme ol the celebration is to plant 350 trees and 350 dozen 
daffodils. The lice's roots reach into the Charles River and its 

branches into Noon Hill. The thirteen original settlers are reflected 
m the thirteen stars in the sky. Flowers and plants which have 
grown in Medfield throughout the centuries include the daffodils, 
violets, lilies, lady slipper, cat-6-nine tails and lastly, 
rhododendrons, acknowledging Rhododendron swamp, a local 
conservation area. Traditional quilt patterns included are laurel 
wreath, crossed canoes, Indian maze, wild geese, and tow tiny 
dragonflies. A mimscule Peak House Roof and Town House 
turrets are rucked into Noon Hill. As an historical note, we have 
recognized Lowell Mason, who was born in the "village" of 
Medfield on January 8, 1792, his Puritan forebears having settled in 
Medfield in 1653. In addition to being a composer of hymns, he 
was one of the founders of public school music education in the 
United States, and some say "the" founder in the world. 



Designers of the Quilt 

Janet Berry 
Cindy Cimo 

Pauline Goucher 
Karen Kerr 

Suznne Pitoniak 



Eileen Alley 
Linda Sandella 
Catherine Nearhos 
Maureen Hufnagle 
Cindy Cimo 
Marilyn Whelan 
Frances Quintiliani 
Karen Kerr 



The Many Needlewomen 

Doreen Gorman 
Dawn Amaral 
Joanne Sano 
Mary Patch 
Mary Jane Ingram 
Brandi Erb 
Nancy Villone 
Judy Sabourin 



Sandra Munsey 
Pauline Goucher 
Janet Barry 
Lulinda Tucker 
Suzanne Pitoniak 
Tracy Jaques 
Joan Fellini 



Cover: Photo of the 350 1 Anniversary Quilt by Pauline Goucher 




350 th Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 




The 2000 Annual Report is dedicated to Sergeant Daniel J. McCarthy, 
Sr., whose quick wit and infectious smile warmed the hearts of all who 
knew him. During his brief tenure on the Medfield Police Department he 
impressed both his colleagues and the many citizens with whom he 
interacted with his cheerful manner and willingness to help others. He 
will fondly be remembered by the many children whom he visited in the 
schools while serving as a DARE Officer or whom he accompanied on 
school field trips. As a police officer, husband, father, son and citizen he 
excelled in all he did. Dan is missed by all of us, but his life will serve as a 
reminder to all to live life to the fullest and to achieve fulfillment from 
serving others. 



IN MEMORIAM 



Vincent M. Cellucci 

Civil Defense 1966-1995 

Civil Defense Auxiliary Police 1 966- 1 995 

Special Police Officer 1 968- 1 995 

Director of Civil Defense 1989-1 995 

Emergency Planning Commission 1 989- 1 995 



Gerald C. Doucette 

Veterans Agent 1 994-2000 

Memorial Day Committee 1 994-2000 

Committee to Study Memorials 1994-2000 



John F. Ganley 

Board of Registrars 1 97 1 - 1 986 

Board of Selectmen 1 990- 1 993 



Virginia F. Kinter 

Deputy Collector 1970-1985 



Daniel J. McCarthy 

Sergeant 1997-2000 



Gertrude A. Simpson 

Secretary to the Board of Water and Sewer 1968-1987 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Incorporated 


1651 


Population 


12,381 as of January 1,2000 


County 


Norfolk 


Size 


14.43 square miles 


Miles of Highway 


74.72 


Elevation 


1 80 feet above sea level at the Town House 


Registered Voters 


7,688 as of December 31, 2000 




Democrats 1 ,490 




Republicans 1.530 




No Party or Designation 4,649 




Other 19 



Government 

Official Notices 

Tax Rate 

Taxes Due 

Town House Hours 

Library Hours 



Transfer Station 
Hours 



Board of Selectmen 

Annual Town Election is the last Monday in March 

Open Town Meeting is the last Monday in April 

All Town Board and Commission meetings are posted on 
the Town House bulletin board 

16.41 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/99-6/30/00) 
13.75 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/00-6/30/01) 

August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st , and May 1 st 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Thursday, 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM 
Friday, 8:30 AM to 1:00 PM 

Monday-Thursday, 10:00 AM to 8:00 PM 
Friday, Saturday, 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM 
Sunday, 1 :00 PM to 4:00 PM (October-March) 





Wed 


Fri 


Sat 


Sun 


April 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


July 


9 to 7 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 




August 


9 to 7 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 




November 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


All other months 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 


9 to 4 





TELEPHONE NUMBERS 

POLICE 
Emergency 911 

Non-Emergency 508-359-2315 

FIRE AND AMBULANCE 
Emergency 911 

Non-Emergency 508-359-2323 



Medfield Town House, 459 Main Street 
Board of Selectmen 
Accountant 
Assessors 
Board of Health 
Building/Inspections 
Conservation 
Personnel 

Planning and Appeals 
Public Works Highway 

Water and Sewer 
Outreach Office 
Town Administrator 
Town Clerk 
Treasurer/Collector 
Veterans Agent 

Memorial Public Library, 468 Main Street 

Hannah Adams Pfaff Center, Dale Street 
Park and Recreation 
Council on Aging 

School Department Administrative Offices, 459 Main Street 

Memorial Elementary School, 59 Adams Street 

Dale Street School, 45 Adams Street 

Ralph Wheelock School, 17 Elm Street 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School, 88 South Street 

Clark Kingsbury High School, 24 Pound Street 



508-359-8505 
Extension 641 
628 
620 
603 
604 
646 
649 
645 
602 
601 
644 

630 
623 
632 

508-359-4544 



508-359-2715 
508-359-3665 

508-359-4798 

508-359-5135 

508-359-5038 

508-359-6055 

508-359-2396 

508-359-4367 



STATE 






SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 
FOR MEDFIELD 



Senator in General Court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth District 

Jo Ann Sprague 

State House Room 3 13B 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-1222 

jsprague@senate.state.ma.us 

Representative in General Court 

\T Norfolk District, Precinct 1 & 4 

Lida Harkins 

State House Room 235 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2883 

lidaharkins@state.ma.us 

Representative in General Court 

12 ,fi Norfolk District, Precinct 2 & 3 

John Rogers 

State House Room 138 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2990 

john.rogers@state.ma.us 



Governor's Councillor 

2 nd District 
Kelly A. Timilty 
State House Room 1 84 
Boston, MA 02133 

(617)727-2795 



FEDERAL 




^ a 




U.S. Representative to Congress 

9 th District 

John J. Moakley 

U.S. Courthouse, Suite 3110 

Boston, MA 02210 

(617)428-2000 

joemoakley@mail.house.gov 

United States Senator 

Edward M. Kennedy 

2400 J.F.K. Federal Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 

senator@kennedy.senate.gov 



United States Senator 

John F. Kerry 



Floor 



1 Bowdoin Square, 10 
Boston, MA 021 14 
(617)565-8519 
john_kerry@kerry.senate.gov 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 

2000 



Elected Officials 




Housing Authority 


Moderator 




Valerie A. Mariani 2001 


George P. Niles, Jr. 


2001 


Tracey Mitchell 2001 
James T. Regan 2003 


Town Clerk 




Richard D. Jordan 2004 


Carol A. Mayer 


2003 


Mary E. Rogers 2005 


Board of Selectmen 




Trust Fund Commissioners 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 2001 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2002 


Ralph E. Marto 2002 


Osier L. Peterson 


2003 


Georgia Colivas 2003 


Board of Assessors 




Appointed by the Board of Selectmen 


Clara E. Doub 


2001 




Francis W. Perry 


2001 


Fire Chief 


Bruce J. Beardsley 


2003 


William A. Kingsbury 


School Committee 




Chief of Police 


Steven E. Kramer 


2001 


Richard D. Hurley 


Carolyn P. Casey 


2001 




James T. Caine 


2002 


Sergeants 


Susan C. Cotter 


2002 


Ronald E. Kerr 


William A. Tosches 


2003 


Raymond J. Wheeler 
John L. Mayer 


Trustees of the Public Library 




John W. Wilhelmi 


James J. Whalen 


2001 


Raymond M. Burton 


Sarah K. Person 


2001 




Geoffrey C. Tritsch 


2002 


Police Officers 


Patricia S. Fitzgerald 


2002 


Richard D. Bishop 


Maura Y. McNicholas 


2002 


Daniel J. Burgess 


Jo-anne L. Hooper 


2003 


Patrick J. Caulfield 
Lorna C. Fabbo 


Planning Board 




Robert G. Flaherty 
Dana P. Friend 


Stephen J. Browne 
Wright C. Dickinson 


2001 
2001 


Elissa G. Franco 


2001 


Shawn P. Garvey 


Timothy P. Sullivan 


2002 


John D. Geary 


George N. Lester 


2005 


Stephen H. Grover 
Thomas M. LaPlante 


Park and Recreation Commissioners 


Daniel J. McCarthy 


James C. Landry 


2001 


Robert E. Naughton 


Scott F. McDermott 


2001 


Kevin W. Robinson 


Nancy H. Jacques 


2002 


Daniel E. Smith 



Toni R. Aronson 2002 

Thomas A. Caragliano 2002 



I own Administrator 

Michael.! Sullivan 2001 

Treasurer/Collector 

Georgia K. Colivas 2003 

Superintendent of Public Works 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2001 

Town Accountant 

Joy Riccuito 2003 

Town Counsel 

MarkG.Cerel 2001 

Board of Health 

Catherine K. Steever 
Heidi F. Groff 
Edith H. Herbeck 
Fred W. Clarridge, Assoc. 

Cemetery Commissioners 

David F. McCue 
Eric W. O'Brien 
Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 

Water and Sewer Commissioners 

Gary A. Lehmann 

Edmund L. Kelley 

Neil D. Mackenzie 

Paul A. Sowyrda, Associate 

Superintendent of Insect Pest Control 

Edward M. Hinkley 2001 

Tree Warden 

Edward M. Hinkley 2001 

Field Driver and Fence Viewer 

John P. O'Toole 2001 

Animal Control Officer 

Jennifer A. Shaw 2001 

Inspector of Animals 

Jennifer A. Shaw 2001 

Pound Keeper 

Jennifer A. Shaw 2001 



Inspection Department 




John P. O'Toole 


2001 


Anthony Calo 


2001 


Peter Navis 


2001 


John A. RoseJr 


2001 


John F. Fratolillo 


2001 


Joseph F. Erskine 


2001 


Tauno O. Aalto 


2001 


James J. Leonard 


2001 



Official Greeter of the Town of Medfleld 

Joseph E. Ryan 2001 

Official Historian of the Town of Medfleld 

Richard P. DeSorgher 2001 



2001 


Official Keepers of the Clock 




2002 


Marc R. Tishler 


2001 


2002 


David P. Maxson 


2001 


2001 


Board of Registrars 






William H. Dunlea, Jr. 


2001 


2001 


Anna M. Murphy 


2002 


2002 


Roberta A. Kolsti 


2003 


2003 


Veterans' Department 






G. Marshall Chick 


2001 


2001 






2002 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 




2003 


Michael J. Clancy 


2003 


2001 







Measurer of Wood and Bark 

Michael J. Clancy 

Public Weigher 

Michael J. Clancy 



2003 



2003 



Constables and Keepers of the Lockup 



Richard D. Bishop 
Daniel J. Burgess 
Ray M. Burton, Jr. 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Robert B. Flaherty 
Dana P. Friend 
John D. Geary 
John F. Gerlach 
Stephen H. Grover 
Richard D. Hurley 
Ronald E. Kerr 



2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 



10 



George W. Kingsbury 


2001 


Jon Evers 


2001 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2001 


Jeffrey M. Farell 


2001 


William H. Mann 


2001 


Edward Farioli 


2001 


John L. Mayer 


2001 


William Fitzpatrick 


2001 


Daniel J. McCarthy 


2001 


Vincent J. Forde 


2001 


Robert E. Naughton 


2001 


Susan Fornaciari 


2001 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2001 


John Gerlach 


2001 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2001 


Barry Glassman 


2001 


Kevin W. Robinson 


2001 


Joseph Griffin 


2001 


Daniel E. Smith 


2001 


Steven F. Hagan 


2001 


Thomas A. Tabarani 


2001 


Thomas Hamano 


2001 


Raymond J. Wheeler 


2001 


Timothy Heinz 


2001 


John W. Wilhelmi 


2001 


Paul Hogan 


2001 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2001 


John Holmes 


2001 






David J. Holt 


2001 


Police Matrons 




Winslow Karlson 


2001 


Jessie A. Erskine 


2001 


Kevin Krichodorfer 


2001 


MaryV. Gillis 


2001 


Paul Kearns 


2001 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2001 


Thomas Leen 


2001 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2001 


Albert Leverone 


2001 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2001 


Allen R. Luther 


2001 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2001 


Robert Maraggio 


2001 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2001 


Roderick MacLeod 


2001 


Jennifer A. Shaw 


2001 


David McConnell 


2001 


Mary L. Solari 


2001 


Peter A. McGowan 


2001 






Andrew McLaughlin 


2001 


Special Police Officers 




Edward J. Meau 


2001 


Leo J. Acera 


2001 


Aaron J. Mick 


2001 


Paul J. Adams 


2001 


Cornelius Moynihan 


2001 


Albert Baima 


2001 


Charles Morreale 


2001 


Joseph Barbone 


2001 


Paul J. Murphy 


2001 


Chris Burbank 


2001 


R. Patrick Murphy 


2001 


Herbert Bun- 


2001 


John Nash 


2001 


Peter E. Breslin 


2001 


Lori Niles 


2001 


Jonathan M. Carroll 


2001 


Peter Opanasetts 


2001 


Jon Cave 


2001 


Jeffrey W. Orvedahl 


2001 


Joseph Concannon 


2001 


Frederick Paulette 


2001 


Amy T. Coughlin 


2001 


Andrea Pierce 


2001 


William J. Davis 


2001 


Stephen K. Plympton 


2001 


Thomas G. Degnim 


2001 


Thomas Quinn 


2001 


Robert A. Dixon 


2001 


Dana S. Randall 


2001 


Louise Droste 


2001 


Donald Reed 


2001 


Kenneth Dunbar 


2001 


Michael W. Riley 


2001 


William J. Dwyer 


2001 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2001 


John T. Garvey 


2001 


Mark Romano 


2001 


Shawn P. Garvey 


2001 


Gary C. Rowley 


2001 


Warren Eagles 


2001 


Wayne A. Sallale 


2001 


David Eberle 


2001 


Mary Louise Secola 


2001 


David C. Egy 


2001 


Robert J. Shannon 


2001 


Leo R. Ethier 


2001 


Jennifer Shaw 


2001 


Glen Eykel 


2001 


Carl Sheridan 


2001 



11 



John S. Shearns 


2001 


William H. Mann 


2001 


Daniel J. Sicard 


2001 


Armando B. Palmieri 


2001 


Paul Sicard 


2001 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2001 


Paul Smith 


2001 


Mary Solari 


2001 


Charles H. Stone, Jr. 


2001 


Thomas Walsh 


2001 


Richard Strauss 


2001 






Thomas A. Tabarani 


2001 


Affordable Housing Committee 




Domenic Tiberi 


2001 


Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2001 


J. Robert Tosi 


2001 


Charles H. Peck 


2001 


Alan Washkewits 


2001 


Diane L. Maxson 


2001 


Todd V. Wilcox 


2001 


Stephen M. Nolan 


2001 


Colin T.Wise 


2001 


Joseph Zegarelli 


2001 


Donna M. Wolfrum 


2001 


John W. McGeorge 


2001 


Sally Wood 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 


2001 






Ann B. Thompson, Ex Officio 


2001 


Emergency Management Agency 








Richard Hurley, Director 


2001 


Council on Aging 




Arline F. Berry 


2001 


Carl J. Brewer 


2001 


Bruce A. Berry 


2001 


Werner F. Kiessling 


2001 


Ray M. Burton 


2001 


Frederick Snow 


2001 


Jon R. Cave 


2001 


Dorothy Whyte 


2003 


John L. Evers 


2001 


Margaret T. Jenkins 


2003 


Edward A. Farioli 


2001 






Terrence A. Gallagher 


2001 


Americans with Disabilities Compliance 


Barry Glassman 


2001 


Review Committee 




Neil I. Grossman 


2001 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 


Thomas S. Hamano 


2001 


Richard D. Hurley 


2001 


William Johnson 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Paul Kearns 


2001 






Laurene A. Keating 


2001 


Board of Appeals on Zoning 




Andrew McLaughlin 


2001 


Robert F. Sylvia 


2001 


Charles A. Morreale 


2001 


Burgess P. Standley 


2002 


Jeffrey W. Orevedahl 


2001 


Stephen P. Nolan 


2003 


Mary Louise Secola 


2001 


Charles H. Peck, Associate 


2001 


Richard C. Strauss 


2001 


Russell J. Hallisey, Associate 


2001 


Kevin Krichdorfer 


2001 


Thomas M. Reis, Associate 


2001 


Cornelius Moynihan 


2001 






Keith A. Noonan 


2001 


Medfield Cultural Council 




Donald W. Reed 


2001 


Wendy Clarridge Corkum 


2001 


Mark A. Romano 


2001 


Mary Anne Hatem 


2001 


Wayne A. Sallale 


2001 


Martha M. Moon 


2001 


Armando R. Vieira 


2001 


Marie Z. Nolan 


2001 






Lucinda Davis 


2002 


Traffic Supervisors 




Karen Delio 


2002 


Robert W. Brady 


2001 


Timothy J. Larkin 


2002 


Joseph Carvalho 


2001 


Susan B. Hunt 


2003 


John T. Garvey 


2001 


Francis A. Iafolla 


2003 


Mary V. Gillis 


2001 


James R. Horgan 


2003 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2001 






George W. Kingsbury 


2001 


Cemetery Agent 




Elisabeth T. Mann 


2001 


Lawrence G. Whitestone 


2001 



12 



Charles River Natural Storage Area 




Donald H. Harding 


2001 


Designees 




Paul B. Rhuda 


2001 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Christopher Summers 


2001 






Ann B. Thompson 


2000 


Collective Bargaining Team 








Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


Emergency Medical Services Response 


Richard D. Hurley 


2001 


Committee 




Keith R. Wasley 


2001 


David Binder, M.D. 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


William A. Kingsbury 


2001 


George A. Keches 


2001 


Joan M. Kiessling 


2001 






Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 


2001 


Community Gardens Committee 




James D. Sullivan, M.D. 


2001 


Leonard C. Haigh 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Edwin J. Kinter 


2001 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


David J. Noonan 


2001 


Emergency Planning Commission 




Conservation Commission 




Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 


Mary McCarthy 


2001 


Edward M. Hinkley 


2001 


I. Lorah I go 


2001 


Richard D. Hurley 


2001 


Ralph Parmigiane 


2001 


William A. Kingsbury 


2001 


Deborah Bero 


2002 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Philip J. Burr 


2002 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


Michael Perloff 


2002 






Beth J. Larkin 


2003 


Enforcing Officer for Zoning 




Theresa A. Cos, Associate 


2001 


John P. O'Toole 


2001 


Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate 


2001 


Anthony Calo, Assistant 


2001 


Caroline Standley, Associate 


2001 


Enterprise Fund Committee 




Constables for Election 




Georgia K. Colivas 


2001 


Carol A. Mayer 


2001 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 



Contract Compliance Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 



2001 



Economic Development Commission 

Paul E. Hinkley 2001 

Ann B. Thompson 2001 

Patrick Casey 2002 

Paul Rhuda 2002 

John T. Harney 2003 

Eric O'Brien 2003 

Charles Peck 2003 

Representative to Regional Hazardous 
Waste Committee 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2001 



Capital Budget Committee 

Bonnie Wren-Burgess 
Joseph Cucinotta 



Fair Housing Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Geographical Information System 

Judith A. Cahill 
Sandra H. Frigon 
Gary A. Lehmann 
Raymond P. Moore 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Michael Perloff 
Charlotte Reinemann 
Sheryl D. Sacchetine 
David G. Strimaitis 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Marjorie M. Temple 
Kristine M. Trierweiler 



2001 



2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 
2001 



2001 
2001 



13 



Historical Commission 

Mar\ Preikszas 
Monica Bushnell 

A nee I in Wolfe 
Richard L. Reinemann 
Burgess P. Standley 
David F. Temple 
Charlotte Reinemann 
Richard P. DeSorgher, Assoc 
Deborah Gaines, Associate 
Thomas S. Lingel, Associate 
Robert Naughton, Associate 
Barbara Palson, Associate 
David R. SharfT, Associate 
Michael R. Taylor, Associate 
John A. Thompson, Associate 
Electa Kane Tritsch, Associate 
Jacqueline Wile, Associate 
Clara B. Doub 

Historic District Commission 

Connie Sweeney 
David R. Sharff 
Burgess P. Standley 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

W. Grant Chambers 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Joseph B. McWilliams 

Kingsbury Pond Committee 

Michael Cronin 
Armand Janjigian 
Barbara Leighton, resigned 
Philip W. Meader, resigned 
Paul Simpson 
Michael J. Sullivan 
John Pratt 
James Shannon 
Sheila Joyce 
Weston Kolsti 

Local Auction Permit Agent 

Evelyn Clarke 



Med field MBTA Advisory Board 



2001 


Designee 




2001 


Michael J.Sullivan 


2001 


2001 






2001 


Medfield State Hospital Community 




2002 


Advisory Board 




2002 


John T. Harney 


2001 


2003 


Richard D. Hurley 


2001 


2001 


William A. Kingsbury 


2001 


2001 


Paul Rhuda 


2001 


2001 


Leo J. Surette 


2001 


2001 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


2001 






2001 


Medfield State Hospital Preservation 


i 


2001 


Committee 


2001 


2001 


Frank L. Garrison 


2001 


2001 


Paul B. Rhuda 


2001 


2001 


Burgess P. Standley 


2001 


2001 


Martha L. Smick 


2001 




Leo J. Surette 


2001 




Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


2002 


John T. Harney 


2001 


2002 


Philip J. Bun- 


2001 


2003 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 






George N. Lester 


2001 


2001 






2001 


Memorial Day Committee 




2001 


June M. Doucette 


2001 




Patricia A. Hoyt 


2001 




Richard D. Hurley 


2001 


2001 


William A. Kingsbury 


2001 


2001 


Jane M. Lomax 


2001 


2001 


Albert J. Manganello 


2001 


2001 


William H. Mann 


2001 


2001 


Frederick Miller, Jr. 


2001 


2001 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 


2001 






2001 


Committee to Study Memorials 




2001 


Richard P. DeSorgher 


2001 


2001 


G. Marshall Chick 


2001 




Robert A. Kinsman 


2001 




Jane M. Lomax 


2001 


2001 


David F. Temple 


2001 



Local Water Resource Management 
Official 

Kenneth P. Feeney 



2001 



Municipal Census Supervisor 

Carol A. Mayer 2001 

Municipal Planning and Building 
Committee 

Lebaron C. Colt 2001 



14 



Stephen R. Burgess 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Bruce O. Tobiasson 


2001 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2001 


Drew C. Adams 


2001 


Geoffrey Tritsch 


2001 


Robert S. Donald 


2001 


Three Rivers Interlocal Council 




Representatives to Neponset 




Kristine Trierweiler 


2001 


Watershed Initiative Committee 








Robert Kinsman 


2001 


350 th Anniversary Committee 




Allison K. Swezey 


2001 


Mathew Arnold 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Richard P. DeSorgher 


2001 






Edward P. Doherty 


2001 


Open Space Planning Committee 




Brand i Erb 


2001 


Jonathan Bennett 


2001 


Lucille Fisher 


2001 


Christine M. Hajjar 


2001 


Mark Fisher 


2001 


Eric W. O'Brien 


2001 


Pam Frawley 


2001 


Martha L. Smick 


2001 


Pauline M. Goucher 


2001 


Caroline D. Standley 


2001 


Beverly L. Hallowell 


2001 


David Wang 


2001 


Nancy Temple Horan 


2001 


I. Lorah I go 


2001 


Richard Hurley 


2001 






Connie Jones 


2001 


Parking Clerk and Hearing Officer 




Alison Lopez 


2001 


Carol A Mayer 


2001 


William H. Mann 


2001 






Jimmy McCIoud 


2001 


Right-To-Know Coordinator 




Gayle Currier 


2001 


William A. Kingsbury 


2001 


Beth Oliphant 


2001 






Cheryl O'Malley 


2001 


Radio Tower Study Committee 




Edward A. Otting 


2001 


David P. Maxson 


2001 


Osier Peterson 


2001 


Willis Pelligian 


2001 


Patricia A. Rioux 


2001 


Paul Rhuda 


2001 


Megan Sullivan 


2001 


Micahel J. Sullivan 


2001 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 






Geralyn M. Warren 


2001 


Safety Committee 




Alice Wheeler 


2001 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 


Gordon Youlden 


2001 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2001 


Mark Wilson 


2001 


Solid Waste Study Committee 




Appointed by the Board of Assessors 


Lebaron C. Colt 


2001 


Stanley E. Bergeron 


2001 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 


Irene M. Hartling 


2001 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2001 


Marjorie M. Temple 


2001 


Ann B. Thompson 


2001 






Andrea Costello 


2001 


Appointed by the Town Accountant 




Kenneth P. Feeney 


2001 


June M. Doucette 


2001 


Sandra Frigon 


2001 






Karen Shapiro 


2001 


Appointed by the Town Clerk 








Marilyn H. Clifford 


2001 


Technology Study Committee 








Richard Boucher 


2001 


Appointed by the Treasurer/Collector 


Alan Joffe 


2001 


Clara DeVasto 


2001 


Gary Lehmann 


2001 


Meline Karapetian 


2001 


Raymond Moore 


2001 


Diane Adair 


2001 



15 



Appointed b\ the Chairman of the 
Selectme n, ( hairm an of the School 
Committee and the Town Moderator 



Appointed by the Town Moderator, 
Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, and 
Chairman of the Warrant Committee 



\ ocational School Committee 



Personnel Board 



Representati\e 




Keith R. Wasley 


2002 


Karl D l ord 


2001 


Kathleen M. Curran 


2003 






Susan Richards 


2003 


Appointed by the Fire Chief 




Debbie Shuman, Associate 


2001 


Charles G. Seavcy, Deputy 


2001 


Rev. Robert Wood, Associate 


2001 


I nomas Sealey, Captain 


2001 






Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lt 


2001 






Richard M. Rogers, Lt 


2001 


Appointed by the Planning Board 




David C. CTToole, Lt 


2001 


Long Range Planning Committee 




Appointed by the Board of Health 




Robert F. Tormey, Jr. 


2001 


William R. Domey, P.E. 


2001 


Peter J. Fellman 


2001 


Sheryl Sacchetine 


2001 


Margaret H. Gryska 


2002 


Janet Lelienthal 


2001 


Burgess P. Standley 


2002 


Mark Oram 


2001 


Keith R. Diggans 


2002 


Appointed by the Moderator 




Sign Advisory Board 








Millie A. Downie 


2002 


Deputy Moderator 




J. Matthew McCormick 


2002 


Thomas Sweeney 


2001 


Alfred J. Bonoldi 


2003 






Jeffrey Hyman 


2003 


Warrant Committee 








LeBaron C. Colt 


2000 






Claire A. Hangen 


2000 






David Wang 


2001 






Anne M.Curtin 


2001 






Marie Zack Nolan 


2001 






Bernard Carroll 


2002 






Peter Fontecchio 


2002 






Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2002 






Joseph R. Parker 


2003 






Daniel W. Nye 


2003 






George A. Keches 


2003 






Permanent School Building and 








Planning Committee 








C. Richard McCullough 


2001 






Keith Mozer 


2001 






Timothy J. Bonfatti 


2001 






Susan C. Cotter 


2002 






David Binder 


2003 







16 



Name 



MEETING SCHEDULE 

Day Time 



Location 



Annual Town Election 


Last Monday in March 


6:00 AM to 8:00 PM 


Memorial School 


Annual Town Meeting 


Last Monday in April 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Appeals Board 


Wednesday, as needed 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Board of Assessors 


1 st Thursday 


6:00 PM 


Town House 


Board of Health 


1 st and 3 rd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Town House 


Cultural Council 


Biannually 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Conservation 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Historical Commission 


3 rd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Housing Authority 


3 rd Monday 


8:00 PM 


Tilden Village 


Library Trustees 


2 nd Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Library 


MEMA 


1 st Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


East Bldg, MSH 


Park and Recreation 


2 nd and 4 th Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Pfaff Center 


Planning Board 


Mondays 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


School Committee 


1 st and 3 rd Mon 


7:30 PM 


High School 




Monthly (July- August) 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Selectmen 


Tuesdays 


7:00 PM 


Town House 


Warrant Committee 


Tuesdays (Nov. -May) 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Water and Sewer 


1 st and 3 rd Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Town House 



17 



350 th Anniversary Celebration Kicks Off with the Gala Ball 

at 
Meeting House Pond 




Photo by Alice Wheeler 



The Alumni Band entertains at the 350 th Gala 




Photo by Alice Wheeler 

Former Police Chief, Bill Mann and his wife Elizabeth with former Fire Chief Joe Ryan 

and Pauline Goucher 



18 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2000 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March. Ms. Ann B. Thompson was 
elected Chairman and Mr. Paul B. Rhuda was elected Clerk. Mr. Osier L. Peterson, who 
was elected by the Townspeople, was the third member of the Board. 



Personnel Developments 

After thirty years of service to the Town of Medfield as Library Director, Ms. Jane 
Archer retired in January. The Board of Selectmen would like to thank Jane for her 
years of dedication to the Medfield Public Library and the residents of Medfield. It was 
truly a pleasure to work with her. 

Mr. Daniel Brassell was hired in April as the new Library Director. The Board wishes to 
welcome Mr. Brassell to Medfield and looks forward to working with him. 



Medfield Experiences a Great Loss 

It is with great sadness that the Board of Selectmen report that Medfield experienced its 
first loss of an active police officer. Sergeant Daniel J. McCarthy was killed while on a 
traffic detail in the Town of Millis. Sergeant McCarthy, husband and father of five, had 
served on the Medfield Police Force since 1997. As a bicycle officer and DARE officer, 
Sergeant McCarthy worked extensively in our school system and with the many school 
children in Medfield. He will be missed greatly by his colleagues and the residents of 
Medfield. 



Medfield State Hospital 

The Medfield State Hospital Preservation Committee continued to work very hard this 
year with Senator Jo Ann Sprague, Representative Lida Harkins and Representative John 
Rogers to raise awareness of the continued deterioration of the buildings at the State 
Hospital. Mothballing efforts at several of the buildings at the State Hospital have begun 
however state and town officials are continuing to work towards a more permanent 
preservation schedule. 



Municipal Planning and Building Committee 

The Board of Selectmen voted to create the Municipal Planning and Building Committee 
to assess the space needs for town departments including Police, Fire, Public Works, 



20 



Park and Recreation, and the Council on Aging. This Committee will meet with the 
above named departments and determine current and future space needs, determine 
feasibility of rehabilitating and/or expanding existing facilities, identify and evaluate 
alternative sites for location of new town buildings, and recommend an implementation 
schedule for rehabilitation and/or replacement of municipal buildings. 



Capital Projects 

As charged, the Permanent School Planning and Building Committee presented plans at 
Town Meeting to address the space needs issues for the school department. The plans 
propose a school renovation and expansion project that would build a new Memorial 
School on the Wheelock campus and extensively renovate the middle school and high 
school. The total cost of the project as presented to Town Meeting in November was 
$54.7 million dollars, which required a special election for a Proposition 2 54 override. 
While the article passed by the two-thirds majority necessary at Town Meeting, it failed 
to pass at the Special Election in December. The Board of Selectmen will continue to 
work with the School Committee, the Permanent School Planning and Building 
Committee and the residents of Medfield on resolving this issue. 

The Public Works Department spent much of the spring, summer, and fall months 
working on the completion of McCarthy Park. Once completed the Department of 
Public Works will have constructed four little league fields and three soccer fields. It is 
anticipated that these fields will be completed and ready for use in the fall of 2001. The 
Board of Selectmen would like to thank the Department of Public Works for their efforts 
in getting this park completed. 

In the spring the Downtown Traffic Improvement Project began and is approximately 
80% completed. This project will alleviate traffic congestion by improving the traffic 
flow through newly installed traffic signals and the redesign of the North and Main 
Street Intersection. The project will also work to make the downtown more pedestrian 
friendly with the renovation of existing sidewalks and the construction of new 
wheelchair ramps throughout the project. Sidewalks will also be extended down South 
Street from Main Street to Pound Street. The Board of Selectmen would like to thank 
the residents for their patience during this construction. 

Sewer installation on South Street, High Street and Phase IA was completed earlier this 
year. The sewer betterments are being calculated and will be issued in early 2001. 
Sewer installation work for Phase IB continues in the Pine Needle Park and Granite 
sections of town. Completion of construction in these areas is expected in 2001. Phase 
IC of the sewer extension project is in the final design phase and construction is 
expected to begin in 2001 . 



21 



Open Space 

In September a Special Town Meeting was held to discuss the proposed purchase of a 
ten-acre parcel of land near Bishop and Harding Streets. Voters at the special town 
meeting approved the $1.1 million dollar purchase of this property for municipal 
purposes. This piece of open space provides additional linkages to the existing open 
spaces in the area, continuing the efforts of the town to improve linkages between open 
space and recreational areas. The Town would like to thank the Hinkley family for the 
opportunity to purchase this piece of open space 

The Town received a generous donation from the Caitlin family with a conservation 
restriction on a portion of North Street Property. The Town would like to thank the 
Caitlin family for their generosity. At this time the Town has approximately two 
hundred acres in conservation restrictions throughout town. 



350 th Anniversary Committee 

The 350 th Anniversary Celebration kicked off in grand style this year with the 350 th Gala 
Dinner Dance at Meeting House Pond in September. Tickets for this event sold out in 
just minutes the prior spring! The Meeting House Lawn was transformed into an elegant 
ballroom under the stars. Congratulations to the 350 th Anniversary Gala Ball Committee 
and all the volunteers who made the Gala such a memorable evening and the perfect 
beginning to our Town's yearlong anniversary celebration. 

The Board of Selectmen look forward to attending the exciting list of 350 th Anniversary 
Celebration events that have been planned for the coming year and encourage all 
Medfield residents to take participate and attend these events. Congratulations again to 
the 350 th Anniversary Committee volunteers for the incredible amount of time and effort 
that has been committed to making this anniversary celebration a year to remember. 



Other Developments 

The Town House computer system was upgraded this year when a local area network 
was installed in the Town House allowing departments to work together more efficiently 
and effectively on projects. 

Senator Jo Ann Sprague, Representative Lida Harkins and Representative John Rogers 
were all returned to office. 

The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test scores were 
released with Medfield students once again placing near the top in statewide school 
system rankings. 



22 



The Town of Medfield has been forced to face many issues this year that have both 
divided the town and drawn it closer together. Throughout this year the Board of 
Selectmen has continued to demonstrate its commitment to education, downtown 
redevelopment, open space protection, long range planning, and most importantly its 
desire to retain a small town atmosphere. This is made possible through the tireless 
efforts of the Town employees, elected and appointed officials and the increasingly 
important volunteers. The Board of Selectmen would like to extend its sincere 
appreciation to all those who donate their time and effort to preserve and sustain the 
character of Medfield while improving the quality of life for all residents. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
Paul B. Rhuda, Clerk 
Osier L. Peterson 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Medfield Board of Selectmen 



23 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

[*0 the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

1 hereb> submit my 19 th Annual Report for the Public Works Department, 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

State Aid Projects : The Downtown Traffic Improvement Project started in the spring 
and continued through summer. At this time the project is 80% completed. Issues 
between the railroad (CFX) and Mass Highway still remain but are close to an 
agreement. This agreement will allow upgrading of the railroad crossing on Main Street. 
We applied for and were granted permission to extend the project down South Street, 
from Main Street to Pound Street. This portion of the project included approximately 
2000 feet of cement sidewalk and six wheelchair ramps. Approximately 500 feet of 
drainage was installed on South Street and Oak Street. The only portion of this project 
remaining is the grinding of 2 inches of old road and resurfacing of South Street and Oak 
Street. Also requested and granted was construction of seven wheelchair ramps at 
Pound Street and Robert Sproul Road, Main Street and Robert Sproul Road, Dale Street 
and North Meadows Road and the school entrance at Pound Street. The sidewalk on 
North Street was reconstructed from Janes Avenue to Frairy Street, in front of Bayer 
Diagnostics. 

McCarthy Park : The Highway Department spent most of spring, summer and fall at 
McCarthy Park constructing 4 little league fields and 3 soccer fields. These fields will be 
completed in spring 2001. 

350 th Anniversary : The Highway Department participated in planting trees for the 350 th 
Anniversary at McCarthy Park, Vine Lake Cemetery, Dale Street School, Metacomet 
Park, Wheelock School and Meeting House Pond. 

The Highway Department continued with general town wide road maintenance. 

Snow : Total snowfall for the year was 44 inches with 28 callouts for salting and 
sanding operations. 

Transfer Station : Special collection days were held at the Highway Garage for CRTs 
(computers and televisions). Cathode ray tubes have been banned from the waste stream 
and will be collected on the last Saturday in April, June and September. 

The town received $6516 from the Municipal Recycling Incentive Program. This is a 
state grant rewarding towns for successful recycling programs. 

The Medfield Highway Department trucked 323 1 .23 tons of rubbish to the Millbury 
incinerator. 



24 



The Town collected $2694.50 in revenue from local business for non-recyclable trash 
taken to the Transfer Station. 



Recycling: Glass 




100.87 tons 


Cans 




6.00 tons 


Plastic 




32.38 tons 


Light Metals 




183.94 tons 


Newspaper 




222.00 tons 


Cardboard/Mixed Paper 


579.38 tons 


Grass/Leaves/Brush 




1,400.00 tons 


Revenue received from deposit cans 


and bottles: $1,753.00 


Household Hazardous Waste: 


The 


Board of Selectmen 



voted to transfer a 
representative to the Regional Hazardous Waste Committee from the Board of Health to 
the Department of Public Works. The Superintendent of Public Works was appointed 
representative and has met with the Charles River HHW Consortium and has negotiated 
agreements with 11 Towns including Medfield for reciprocal HHW collection days. 
Permanent collection days have also been set for CRTs and mercury thermometers. 

At the 2000 Annual Town Meeting, it was voted to transfer the Cemetery Department to 
the Public Works Department. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

The Medfield Water Department installed 33 new services and 1 1 new hydrants. 
Eight hundred feet of 8 inch water main and 3 new hydrants were installed by Brook 
Run Development Corp. in the Village at Medfield. Five hundred feet of 8 inch water 
main was replaced on Stagecoach Road by CJP & Sons Construction Co. These 
installations were inspected by the Water Department. There were 4 water breaks and 
10 emergency callouts due to sewer installation. 

In the spring, the failure of a Parco valve at well #3 caused an excess of caustic soda to 
be pumped into the water system. This caused problems on the south side of town in the 
Stagecoach, Snyder, Wilson Road area. This problem has been resolved by additional 
alarm sensors that will shut a well down due to failure of any part of the chemical feed 
system. 

Flushing Program : In a continuing effort to ensure quality water, the Water Department 
flushed the water system in the spring and in the fall. 

A total of 429,068,963 gallons of water were pumped in 2000. 

Congratulations to Chris Rhuda for successfully completing the State Grade 2 
examination for distribution and treatment. 



25 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 2000 the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant treated 332,181,580 gallons of 
sewerage from homes and various businesses in town. The State Hospital discharged 
33,958,420 gallons of sewerage and 590,325 gallons of septic from private systems were 
treated. The combined effluent was discharged to the Charles River with a better than 
98% removal o( impurities. One million five hundred eighty five thousand gallons of 
sludge were shipped to Woonsocket, Rhode Island for incineration. 

The WWTP has conducted experiments to reduce phosphorous to .2 milligrams per liter 
to help reduce nutrient levels in the Charles River. 

Congratulations to Barry Mandell for successfully completing the State Grade 6 
examination. 

In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation to Administrative Secretaries Edie Fernald 
of the Highway Department and Mary Luciano of the Water and Sewer Department. 
Appreciation is also given to Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman, Edward 
Hinkley, Water & Sewer Foreman and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant as well as all the men of the various departments who are to be 
commended for their continuous conscientious public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Kenneth P. Feeney 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



'■■.. - ; : ■■;,■■'-. .'•:.'. ■ A::'' : >-.VV.fe' 




Public Works begins work on McCarthy Park 



26 



BOARD OF WATER AND SEWERAGE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The town continued to respond well to the water conservation signs keeping the 
consumption within the goals of the program. 

The Board is happy to report progress on the acquisition and exploration of the State 
Hospital Well field. Transfer of the hospital well field and adjacent parcels of land now 
state property to the Town of Medfield can be expected during 2001. Extensive test 
pumping of a production well indicated a capacity of over 500,000 gallons per day and 
excellent quality. Since pumping permits are still in force, the town can plan for full 
development and speedy activation of that well. 

The design phase of our Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrade is 40% completed. 
Completion is expected by early summer of 2001 . Phosphor and nitrogen control will be 
required for the upgraded plant. DEP has posed additional testing on the effluent 
resulting in increased operating cost of the plant. 

Repair of the older sewer lines is continuing on a yearly basis to further reduce the 
inflow/infiltration of stormwater into the sewer system. This is reducing the load for our 
plant and prevents stormwater to flow into the Charles River. 

The EPA, State DEP and the Neponset and Charles River Watershed Associations are 
concerned that sewer extensions might deplete the aquifers. To minimize this potential 
impact, they promote better stormwater management by the towns adjacent to these river 
basins. In keeping with this, the EPA has issued Phase II of Storm Water Management 
Policies requiring communities and individual homeowners to promote recharging of 
aquifers while protecting wetlands and well fields. The Public Works Department will 
issue a Request for Proposals to perform a Pilot Study and drafting of a Storm Water 
Management Plan for Medfield in accordance with EPA's "best management practices". 
A Storm Water Management Committee was established to look into consolidation of 
the various regulations by town agencies concerned with Storm Water Management. 

With the completion of previous sewer extension projects, abutters may connect to the 
new lines as needed. While mandatory connection is not required, the Town is issuing 
betterments to those properties that abut the newly completed sewer lines. A listing of 
the completed sewer lines is available at the Office of Water and Sewerage, Town House 
and on the Medfield web site. 

Phase IB of our sewer extension program is running on schedule. The contractor is 
performing well. After the winter shutdown, a completion date is projected for fall 
2001. Phase 1C design is almost completed. We are still planning for a construction 
start in April 2001 but delays in completing the topographical survey and snow might 
cause some delays. 



27 



In response to petitions by town residents, Forest, Camelot and Granite Streets were 
added to the original plan. Substandard soil conditions in these streets make repair of 
the on-site septic disposal systems unpractical. MEPA has approved the design of the 
balance of the town sewer extension plan that includes these streets. The Town must 
still approve funding for this effort. 

Sewer user fees remain the same as in the previous year. Water fees had to be adjusted 
to maintain the Enterprise Fund. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Neil D. Mackenzie, Chairman 

Gary A. Lehmann 

Edmund L. Kelley 

Paul A. Sowyrda, Associate Member 




Public Works helps with the arrival of the 350 th Anniversary Trees 



28 



PLANNING BOARD 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2000 the Planning Board approved one definitive Open Space Residential 
subdivision plan with seventeen lots located off Granite Street, Bridlefield. 

A total of twenty-two lots were released for building from two previously approved 
subdivisions: Woodcliff Hills and Summer Meadows. 

The Board endorsed six "approval-not-required" plans, creating two new lots along 
existing streets and redefining lot lines for four existing lots. 



TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Planning Board placed one article on the Warrant for 2000. The article, which 
would have allowed one off premise sign for businesses on Park Street, was withdrawn 
at Town Meeting for further study. 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

During 2000 the Sign Advisory Board continued to review applications for sign permits 
and to advise and assist sign applicants. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

The Planning Board continued to work with the LRPC toward the improvement of 
managed growth within the Town, in part, through reviewing the Zoning By-Law. 

OTHER BUSINESS 

The Planning Board revised its rates as set forth in the Land Subdivision rules and 
Regulations of the Planning Board of the Town of Medfield this year. 

Board members served on the Drainage Study Committee, Capital Budget Committee, 
and Metropolitan Area Planning Council. 

The Board continued to use the engineering services of Earth Tech, Inc. for subdivision 
review and street construction inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and assistance of the 
Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to Town Counsel Mark G. Cerel; 
Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth P. Feeney; and Tree Warden Edward Hinkley. 



29 



Planning Board meetings are generally held on Monday evenings at 8:00 P.M. at the 
I own House. These meetings are open to the public. Appointments with the Board 
must be made by the Thursday noon prior to the meeting. Request for information or 
appointments should be directed to the Planning Board Administrator, Norma Cronin, at 
the Town House, 508-359-8505, ext. 645. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Timothy P. Sullivan, Chairman 
Stephen J. Browne, Vice - Chairman 
George N. Lester, Secretary 
Elissa G. Franco, Member 
Wright C. Dickinson, Member 




The first 350 th Anniversary Daffodil Bulb is planted at the Town House 



30 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



During 2000 the Board of Appeals acted on forty-nine applications as follows: 



GRANTED: Four Special Permits for Recreational Structures i.e. swimming pools 
One Special Permit for restaurants 

Six Special Permits for parking in the Downtown Parking District 
One Special Permit for a convenience store and parking 
Two Special Permits for construction of houses in the Aquifer Protection 
District 

Three Special Permits for personal wireless antenna and appurtenant 
facilities 

One Special Permit for Open Space Development 
One Special Permit for an addition to a building for light manufacturing 
One Special Permit for work on a building parking lot in the Aquifer 
Protection District 

Two determinations that specific and material changes in applications 
have occurred to allow a return to the Board with a new application in 
less than two years 

Extension of a Comprehensive Permit for an over 55 housing 
development on Dale Street 

Twenty-three findings that proposed additions will not intensify the 
existing nonconformity 

One finding that the demolition of existing houses and the replacement 
with a new house would not intensify the existing nonconformity 



DENIED: One Special Permit for construction of a house on a lot partially in the 
Watershed Protection District 

One finding that additions to the house and the addition of a swimming 
pool would not intensify the existing nonconformity 
Two Variances for decks 

One finding that an addition to a daycare facility would not intensify the 
existing nonconformity 

One application was withdrawn without prejudice. 



31 



1 he Bond of Appeals would like to express its sincere thanks for all the support and 
consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards and the residents of 
Medfield 

Respectfully submitted. 



Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Clerk 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Thomas M. Reis, Associate 
Russell J. Hallisey, Associate 




mm m v^y^rm^^^^A 

Board of Selectmen conduct the annual Perambulation of the Town Boundaries 



32 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The year 2000 was a very busy year with the office witnessing much change. 

Throughout this revaluation year, Stan Bergeron, the Town's appraiser, was occupied 
reviewing all new construction and property sales and refining values for each parcel in 
Town. Proposed values were approved by the Department of Revenue in December and 
published in the Medfield Press. The Medfield public school students continued to do 
well on the MCAS (Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System) and prices of 
both new construction and existing homes continued to escalate through 2000. Town 
wide value increased $353,704,454, to $1.46 billion, a 32% increase from the prior fiscal 
year. The fiscal 2000 tax rate was approved at $13.75 per thousand, a 17% reduction 
from the year-earlier rate of $16.49. Given the significant increase to value, there have 
been many questions from taxpayers, but relatively few appeals application received. 
The year concluded with tax bills timely issued and a tax rate of $13.75 for all 
properties. 

After serving the Board faithfully for 1 5 years, Carol Rossi retired in March. The Board 
of Selectmen and Town Administrator joined the Board of Assessors in thanking Carol 
for her many years of service on behalf of the Town and taxpayers and wishing her well 
in her retirement. After interviewing several very well-qualified candidates, the Board 
of Selectmen, together with the Board of Assessors, appointed Francis K. Perry III to fill 
the remainder of Carol's term. The Assessors and Selectmen were impressed and 
heartened by both the number and qualifications of town residents who were interested 
and committed to serve. 

Marjorie Temple, administrative assistant to the Board, announced her retirement to be 
effective early in 2001. Having served the Town in this capacity since 1980, Marjorie 
has significantly upgraded the capacities of the office and has served as town hall's 
resident expert on the GIS system. During 2000, Marjorie smoothly coordinated the 
many issues facing the Board while continuing to serve as a valuable resource to the 
taxpayers of Medfield. An advocate for the residents of the community, Marjorie' s 
expertise and professionalism is appreciated - and will be missed. 

The owners of Wilkins Glen Apartments filed suit against Medfield, alleging 
overpayment of funds in-lieu of taxes, and also appealed the Board's valuation of 



33 



Wilkins Glen for fiscal 1998 and 1999. The Board worked with the Selectmen, Town 
Administrator and Town Counsel to fashion a settlement. 

The Board continues into 2001 with its efforts to recruit an individual to fulfill Marjorie 
Temple's responsibilities. 

Respectfully submitted, 



C. B. Doub, Chairman 
Bruce J. Beardsley, clerk 
Frank J. Perry, III, third member 





**»«4' 



•-• ■ ..!;, '■■'!,. 



350 th Anniversary Tree Planting 



34 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I would like to start out by saying that this past year has been a very sad one as Medfield 
lost its' first Officer "in the line of duty". Officer Daniel J McCarthy, a three and a half 
year veteran, was struck in killed by a motorist while directing traffic in Millis on 
September 21 st . Danny was posthumously promoted to the rank of Sergeant. Sergeant 
McCarthy's death leaves a huge void in the department. A father of five children, a 
dedicated husband, Officer and friend who greeted everyone with a smile will not be 
forgotten. The support from the residents, businesses and government body to the 
department and McCarthy family show just how much Danny touched their lives. We 
thank all who supported us in this very trying time. 

Officer Dan Smith transferred to the Franklin Police Department in December, Officer 
Smith joined the Medfield Force in 1997. We wish Dan the best with his new 
department. Officer Ray Burton who had been acting provisionally as the 1 1-7 Sergeant , 
was permantly appointed to the rank of Sergeant and now is in charge of the 11-7 shift. 

Sergeants Wheeler, Wilhelmi, Mayer and Burton attended a two day class for 
supervisors on implementing community policing put on by the IACP. Detectives 
Wilhelmi, Naughton, Geary and Burgess attended several classes throughout the year on 
Internet releated crimes. All officers attended a minimum of 40 hours of In-service 
training as mandated by the MCJTC as well as several other specialty classes. 

We continue to apply and receive grants for community policing efforts, this keeps our 
web page going, allows us to run programs such as Kids-ID program, Triad, Community 
policing specialized patrols and bicycle safety classes. 

We have received money from the capital account to finally upgrade our Radio system, 
the bid went out and should be awarded in late January. We hope to have the new system 
up and running by April 1 st . 

At this time I would like to thank the men and women of the department who serve the 
Town each and every day with honor, and to their families whose sacrifice has never 
been more realized then this past year who often go without their loved ones during 
holidays and special events so that they may serve the town and its residents. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Richard D Hurley 
Chief of Police 



35 



I he Police Department handled 7,092 calls for service in 1999. This is a summary of 
those calls. 



Accidents 




Annoying Calls Complaint 


193 


Arrests 


53 


Arson 


1 


Assaults 


18 


Assists 


1,040 


Breaking and Entering 


17 


Burglar Alarms 


773 


Citations Issued 


2,225 


Civil/Family Problems 


143 


Deer hit by Motor Vehicle 


32 


Disturbance Calls 


154 


Doors and Windows 


217 


Drug Offenses 


20 


Emergency 91 1 Calls Received 


1,697 


Fire Alarms Answered 


155 


Calls given to Detectives for Investigation 


126 


Larceny 


60 


Malicious Damage 


100 


Medical Calls 


324 


Messages Delivered 


23 


Mischief 


114 


Miscellaneous Complaints Answered 


697 


Missing Patients -MSH 


5 


Missing Patients Returned - MSH 


5 


Missing Persons Reported 


30 


Missing Persons Returned 


30 


Parking Tickets Issued 


185 


Protective Custody 


7 


Runaways 


1 


Runaways Returned 


1 


Sex Offenses 


1 


Stolen Cars 


6 


Stolen Cars Recovered 


4 


Sudden Deaths 


5 


Summons Served 


96 


Suspicious Cars 


109 


Suspicious Persons 


154 


Threats 


10 


Traffic/Vehicle Complaints 


390 


Vehicles Towed 


147 



36 



MEDFIELD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

I hereby submit the annual report for the Medfield Emergency Management Agency for 
the year ending December 31, 2000. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency provides coordination between the 
Selectmen, Town Departments, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency and 
the Federal Emergency Agency. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency is divided into two sections. One 
section, the Management Group contains amateur radio operators, a transport section and 
shelter management people. The second section contains the auxiliary police officers. 
Both groups are under the control of the Emergency Management Agency 
Director/Chief of Police. 

The emergency management section maintains backup communications systems, 
provides transportation to and runs shelter operations in case of emergencies where 
people would need temporary shelter due to power outages or other such storm damage. 
The auxiliary police unity provides additional manpower to the police department during 
emergencies and large events such as parades and other large public gatherings. As in 
past years both groups combined to donate over 1 ,000 man-hours of community service 
to the town. 

The agency has settled into the new headquarters building at 7 Canal Street at Medfield 
State Hospital. Work continues on the building and on equipment to make the agency 
better able to serve the community in times of emergency. 

One project that stands out is the upgrading of the communications to include nation 
wide capability with the installation of a high frequency radio and antenna system. 
Another project under way is the renovation of a military 2 VS-ton truck recently acquired 
from the US Air Force. Once completed the vehicle will be used to transport or evacuate 
up to 25 people at a time. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the department for their continued support 
and contributions throughout the year. Also I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen. 
Michael Sullivan, his staff and the Medfield Police Department for their assistance and 
support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
Chief of Police 



37 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER/INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

This report reflects my duties as Animal Control Officer and Animal Inspector from 
January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2000. 



Total Animal Control Calls 




2,588 


Total Animal Control Incidents 




889 


Number of bats, birds, squirrels, snakes, 


etc. removed from 




resident's homes 




73 


Leash law violations (Many dogs gone < 


m arrival 


201 


Licensed dogs returned to their owners 




115 


Barking Dog Complaints 




23 


Number of citations issued 




79 


Number of animals hit by cars which were removed and buried by the ACO 




Cats 




26 


Dogs 




5 


Raccoons 




13 


Deer 




50 


Opossums 




14 


Skunks 




17 


Other (rabbits, woodchucks, etc.) 




41 



Number of sick or injured wildlife which had to be euthanized 46 
byACO 

Raccoons 6 

Deer 6 

Skunk 5 

Other (bats, opossums, squirrels, birds) 29 



38 



There were eleven animals tested for rabies with three positive results. 

Note: All sick wildlife is presumed to be rabid, and is incinerated. 

There were eleven dog bites and two cat bites, each requiring a minimum 10-day 

quarantine. There were fourteen cats and two dogs placed in forty-five day 

quarantines for wounds of an unknown origin. 



Number of dogs adopted 7 

Number of cats adopted 1 6 

Number of kittens adopted 47 

There are still twelve cats and one rabbit living at the shelter. 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of the Town of 
Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals and barns are in 
the best of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 1999: 

Beef Cows 3 

Donkeys 2 

Goats 3 

Horses 65 

Poultry 73 

Sheep 8 

I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department and Heritage Hill Veterinary Clinic. I also want to thank 
my new assistant Animal Control Officers, Gail Giggi and Mayla Secola, volunteers 
Mike Barta and Kim Agricola, Lise Biagetti, Anne Boylan, Paul Hogan, Keith Mozer, 
Diana Outchunis, Mary Anne Reddy, Debbie Shuman and Joan White and for donating 
their time at the shelter, and to the Medfield residents for their ongoing donations to 
Shelter 2000, Inc. and their support of the animals at the Medfield Animal Shelter. 
Thank you to the Shelter 2000, Inc. Board of Directors for their dedication to our 
project and also to Georganne Gerlach for keeping track of the hundreds of donations. 
Without them we could not have saved the sixteen cats, forty-seven kittens and seven 
dogs that were adopted this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer A. Shaw 

Animal Control Officer/ Animal Inspector 



39 



MEDFIELD 
FIRE - RESCUE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1 hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2000. 

Fire Department 

The Fire Department continues to be busy, our requests for service continue to rise. I am 
happy to report for the second year in a row there were no major property losses due to 
fire in town. We responded to several major fires in our neighboring towns as part of our 
mutual aid agreements. Mutual aid is a vital part of our operations, it is comforting to 
know there are endless resources in the event of a major incident, just a phone call away. 

The ongoing installation of sewer throughout the town has kept us busy. Due to the 
immense amount of ledge encountered, blasting was being done almost on a daily basis. 
Fire personnel monitored these sites to assure all safety measures were being adhered to. 

This year we placed into service a new Chiefs command vehicle and a 12' inflatable 
rescue boat. Shortly after accepting delivery of the boat we had requests to aid a couple 
of fishermen who lost their boat in a storm and to search for a couple of campers who 
failed to return on time. This year I will be seeking funds to re-furbish a 1984 Mack 
Pumper, this will be modified to carry all our rescue and extrication equipment. The re- 
furbishing of this truck will delay the replacing of our 1977 Pumper for a couple more 
years. The remainder of our equipment remains in good working order. In December I 
applied for a State grant for firefighter safety equipment, these funds are expected to 
made available in early 2001. The town has established a municipal building planning 
committee to address the space and safety concerns within the facility. Working closely 
with the committee we will look at the departments' current needs and make 
recommendations as to the necessary renovations that will provide adequate space for 
future growth. 

Our staffing levels remain the same. It is becoming harder to recruit and retain on-call 
members to serve our needs. This problem is a nationwide problem and not unique to 
our town. In the FY2002 budget, I will be asking for two more full-time FF/EMT 
positions, this will bring our full-time staff up to four. This is a pro-active approach to 
potential staffing problems. 

Our departmental training continued throughout the year. In the spring the Mass Fire 
Academy conducted a Vehicle Extrication class. Other departmental training consisted 
of water rescue with our new boat, protective breathing search and rescue, and a 
review of pumps and hydraulics. Fire prevention inspections, drills, and plan reviews 
were conducted throughout the year. 



40 



Ambulance 

The Ambulance responded to five hundred and thirty two calls for assistance this year. 
Our call volume is constantly on the rise, where it will level off it's hard to predict. Since 
1997 when the Fire Dept assumed the operation of this service, our annual call volume 
has increased by one hundred and forty calls for assistance. 

After much anticipation, in February we took delivery of our new Ambulance. This 
vehicle will serve the needs of the residents for many years to come. In the Fall we 
initiated steps to enhance our level of service. We are now able to operate at the EMT- 
Intermediate level, which allows those that are trained to start IV s and intubate a patient 
when needed. 

The staffing of the Ambulance is a constant struggle. Recruiting and retaining people is 
difficult for this position, which is why the request for full-time personnel is being made. 
We are fortunate to have the dedicated staff that we have, they are often doing far more 
than is expected in order to provide the best service possible. Training continues on a 
monthly basis. Members review any regulation changes, perform the required 
defibrillator training, and become familiar with any new equipment. 

In September, Fire and EMS personnel responded to Millis for a pedestrian accident. It 
was this tragic accident that claimed the life of SGT. Daniel McCarthy, he will be 
missed by all of us. During this event, personnel worked relentlessly to give Dan every 
possible chance for survival. The outcome was out of our hands but I want you to know 
how proud I am and what an honor it is to be associated with these dedicated people on a 
daily basis. 

I would like to thank all the men and women of the department who serve as Firefighters 
and /or Emergency Medical Technicians. I look forward to their continued commitment 
in serving our community. I would also like to thank Georganne Gerlach, our ambulance 
billing secretary, Town Hall officials and staff for their help and support throughout the 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



William A. Kingsbury 
Fire Chief 



41 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1999 



AMBULANCE 










Total Calls 


532 








Transports To: 


Metrowest Medical 
Southwood Hospital 
Deaconess Glover 
Framingham Union 
Brigham & Womens 
Other 


246 
14 
21 

2 
5 


Norwood Hospital 
Newton Wellesley 
Newton Wellesley 
Children's Hospital 


151 

10 

1 

1 



Advanced Life Support 

Metrowest Medical 



206 Norwood Hospital 



102 



Other Services 



Medflight 
Mutual Aid 
Details 



26 



Standby 2 Cancelled 

Rendered 53 Received 



79 

32 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Alarms 










Accidental/System Malfunction 




61 






Box 




153 






False 




17 






Still 




287 






Home 




66 






Services 










Ambulance Assist 


18 




Haz-mat 


12 


Appliances 


10 




Investigations 


65 


Brush and Grass 


25 




Motor Vehicles 


4 


Burners Oil 


8 




Motor Vehicle Accidents 


25 


Gas 


7 




Mutual Aid Rendered 


14 


Carbon Monoxide Alarms 


22 




Received 


6 


Details 


7 




Police Assist 


4 


Dumpsters 


1 




Reports to Fire Marshall 


10 


Electrical 


9 




Responses to MSH 


17 


Fuel Spills 


15 




Station Coverage 


5 


Gas Leaks/Investigations 


6 




Structures 


18 


Med-Flight 


6 




Storm Related 


28 


Tar Kettle/Tanker 


1 




Searches 


4 



42 



Public Assistance 






Permits Issued 




Lock Outs 




25 


Blasting 


35 


Pumping Cellars 




10 


Bonfire 


1 


Water Problems 




28 


Burning 


505 


Other 




69 


Fuel Storage 
Spinkler Inst/Alt 


20 
4 


Inspections 






Propane Storage 


17 


Blasting 




720 


U/Tank Removal 


11 


Fire Prevention 




35 


Fire Alarm Inst. 


1 


Fuel Storage 




20 


Tank Truck 


9 


New Residential 




31 






Smoke Detectors New 


31 








Resale 


172 






Oil Burners 




28 






Wood Stoves 




6 






U/Tank Removal 




11 








■' 



Fire Command Vehicle and Rescue Boat 



43 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

\o the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 2000: 

Department Permits Inspections Income Expenses 



2000 1999 2000 1999 



2000 



1999 



2000 



1999 



Building 


368 


320 


1,125 


Plumbing 


187 


183 


279 


Gas 


176 


185 


217 


Wiring 


365 


369 


579 



1,632 $125,725 $88,236 $45,271 $38,732 

302 9,246 9,713 6,275 6,613 

246 4,975 5,572 4,907 5,389 

565 20,560 22,978 13,191 12,694 



Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the calendar year 
2000 were $160,506.00 as compared to $126,499.00 in 1999. Expenses for 2000 were 
$69,644.00 as compared $63,428.00 in 1999. 



BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 



New single family dwellings 


24 


Multi Family (Condo's) 


21 


Complete partially finished single dwellings 





Additions to private dwellings 


78 


Renovations to private dwellings 


91 


Additions & renovations to business/industrial buildings 


29 


New industrial/business buildings 


4 


Family Apartments 





2 Family Apartments 





Shingling roof & installation of sidewalls 


40 


Private swimming pools 


22 


Accessory buildings 


10 


Residential garages 


4 


Demolition's 


12 


Tents (temporary) & Construction trailers 


5 


Signs 


18 


Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 


10 


TOTAL 


368 



44 



Occupancy certificates were issued for 29 new residences in 2000, as compared to 21 in 
1999 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, nursing homes 
and nursery schools amounted to 72 inspections for 2000. 



1999 2000 



$7,585,500 


$9,738,400 


4,052,778 

897,910 

469,000 




8,354,254 

260,000 

488,682 

















Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 



New Dwellings 

Renovations and additions, pools, shingling, 

sidewalls, etc. on residential 
New Construction business and industry 
Renovations and additions business and industry 
Multi-family dwellings 
Two family dwellings 
Family Apartments 



Whether you are planning to add a pool, a deck, reshingle, apply siding or install 
replacement windows, most changes to your home require a building permit. These 
comprehensive building laws may seem cumbersome, but they are meant to benefit us 
all by monitoring the building and development activities in our community. Please, 
also remember that the placement of any type of structure, as simple as a tool shed 
(accessory building) on your property must adhere to the rules and regulations of the 
Medfield Zoning Bylaws, and in most cases a building permit is required. Before you 
proceed with any changes to your home or property, please call the Inspection 
Department at the Town Hall (359-8505, ext. 603) and we will help you get started in 
the process of applying for a permit. 

Enforcement of the State Building Code (780 CMR - 6th Edition) continues to be the 
responsibility of the local building inspectors. Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring 
contractors to be registered with the Commonwealth became the responsibility of the 
Inspection Department staff to institute procedural changes for compliance. The office 
of the Inspection Department also keeps an accurate registration of builders holding 
State Construction Supervisor's licenses in order to assure compliance with Section 
109.1.1 of the State Building Code. The building inspectors continue the enforcement to 
the code by making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other 
places of assembly on a periodic basis. 



45 



The Inspectors of Buildings also serve the town in the capacity of Enforcing Officers for 
Zoning and as such, made 108 inspections to investigate complaints and inquiries 
brought to their attention by residents as well as other town boards and departments. 

1 lie assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections was greatly 
appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in 
new construction and in additions and renovations as well as inspecting the installation 
of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are reminded of the importance of having 
their wood stove installations inspected and certified in accordance with requirements of 
the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

A special thanks again this year to Ann Sarno and Margaret Warren for their continued 
help in this office. 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to administer, 
investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. 
Homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas permits. Permits can only be issued to a 
licensed Journeyman or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, altered, 
removed, replaced, or repaired until a permit has been issued by the Inspector of 
Plumbing or Gas. The Inspection Department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas permits. When a citizen of the 
town requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the assurance 
that the installation will not only be installed correctly and safely, but also that the work 
will be installed by a professional and not exploited by non professionals. It is definitely 
in the homeowners interest to insist on inspections by qualified town inspectors 
knowledgeable in their trade. It is morfey well spent in times where every penny counts. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give the 
consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices, where necessary, to 
insure the continuance of the good clean potable water of which we are very proud in 
Medfield. 

The assistance of John Fratolillo during periodic absences of the plumbing and gas 
inspectors was greatly appreciated. 



46 



WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code as well as 
the National Electric Code in his inspections of wiring installations for which permits are 
issued. Residents are reminded that the permitting process is in effect to assure safe and 
correct installations. The assistance of James Leonard during the periodic absences of 
the Wiring Inspector was greatly appreciated. 



Respectfully submitted, 



John P. OToole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 




Daffodil Planting Volunteers at the Town House 



47 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

1 hereby submit my annual report for the year ending December 31, 2000. 

The following scales, weights, liquid measuring meters and linear measures were sealed: 



Balance and Scales 


30 


Weights 


55 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


70 


Linear Measures 


4 



23 1 inspections were made and/or sealed in 2000. 
Revenue for the department was $3,332.00. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Patricia A. Rioux 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 




Inside the 1651 Shoppe at the Dwight Derby House 



48 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



The following is the Annual Report for the Cemetery Department for the year ending 
December 31, 2000. 

For the year 2000, the Cemetery Department continued its efforts to beautify the 
cemetery grounds with the fertilization and pruning of trees and fertilization, liming and 
insect control for the turf areas of the cemetery. 

In the fall, with the help of volunteers, 30 new trees were planted throughout the 
cemetery to celebrate the town's 350 th anniversary. 

There were 59 interments and 79 burial plots sold during the year 2000. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Lawrence Whitestone 
Cemetery Superintendent 




Grand Opening of the 1651 Shoppe at the Dwight Derby House 



49 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act v 
M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40, the Department of Environmental Protection's Stormwater 
Management Policy and the Medfield Wetland Bylaw, Article IX. These laws seek to 
protect wetlands and waterways and thereby safeguard public surface and groundwater 
supplies and prevents damage from flooding by preserving floodplains, swamps and bogs, 
streams and other water bodies, and certain types of land adjoining them. Under the 
Medfield Wetlands Bylaw, vernal pools and a 50-foot no-disturb buffer area are protected 
resource areas. Anyone proposing to alter a wetland or land subject to flooding, or to 
perform work within 1 00 feet of a wetland or bank, or within 200 feet of a river or perennial 
stream must file with the Conservation Commission. The riverfront resource area extends 
200 feet on each side of a perennial stream, brook, or river. Medfield has two major rivers: 
the Charles River and the Stop River and numerous perennial streams and brooks. Anyone 
wishing to work within this protected 200-foot resource area must satisfy the Commission 
that the proposed work would not significantly harm the riverfront area or adjacent 
wetlands. Before any work is begun, the Commission must make a determination that these 
laws either: (i) do not apply; (ii) apply and the work may be performed under conditions the 
Commission imposes as a Determination of Applicability or an Order of Conditions; (iii) 
apply and the work may be performed without conditions. 

The Commission is largely self-funded through the fees charged under the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act and the Medfield Wetland Bylaw. The Commission's fees are 
consistent with those charged in comparable towns. The Town benefits from the Wetlands 
Protection laws and their associated regulations by protecting Medfield' s wetlands from 
pollution, nutrient overloading and encroachment and by providing guidance and 
consistency to applicants with regards to the Commission's rules and regulations for various 
construction projects. The Commission's preeminent concern is to ensure that the eight 
interests of the Massachusetts Protection Act and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw are upheld. 
The eight important public interests or values are: protection of public and private water 
supply, protection of groundwater supply, flood control, storm damage prevention, 
prevention of pollution, protection of land containing shellfish, protection of fisheries and 
protection of wildlife habitat, 

Enforcement activities by the Commission have included various investigations to 
determine whether applicable laws have been violated, the causes of the violations and 
explore the remedies for damage to wetland resource areas, including ponds, streams, 
brooks, wetlands vegetation and wildlife habitat. The Commission has issued several 
notices of violation to developers and others ( often at the prompting of alert neighbors) 
when construction activities have endangered wetlands resources protected by state and 



50 



local laws. These violations generally have been remedied to the satisfaction of the 
Commission. 

In 2000, the Commission held 23 public meetings for the purpose of: 16 Requests for a 
Determination of Applicability, 19 Notices of Intent, 20 continued hearings for Notices of 
Intent, 2 Notice of Resource Area Delineation, 4 continued hearings for Notice of Resource 
Area Delineation 1 Amendment to an exiting Order of Conditions, 1 Enforcement actions, 
and 10 informal reviews, project updates and presentations. The Commission issued the 
following formal decisions: 14 Negative Determinations of Applicability, 17 Orders of 
Conditions, 11 Certificates of Compliance, 9 Partial Certificates of Compliance, 7 
Extensions and 5 Letters of Violation. The Conservation Officer handled 1,761 telephone 
calls during the year. The voice mail system continues to provide the public with a 
beneficial communication tool with the Commission. 

Five 'citations' , totaling $675.00 were issued by the Commission for wetland bylaw 
violations. A total of $1200. 00 remains outstanding from 1999. We anticipate that the year 
2001 will continue to be active for the Commission as planning continues for various 
subdivisions, and the scope of review has increased with riverfront resource area projects 
and the implementation of the DEP Stormwater Management Policy. 

Leslee Willitts continues to serve as the Town's Conservation Officer. The position is a 
permanent part-time salaried position with a minimum of 20 hours per week and is funded 
entirely by the fees collected from applicants. The Conservation Office is located on the 
second floor of Town Hall, Room 209 and is open on Wednesdays and Thursdays. The 
Conservation Officer is responsible for site inspections, investigation of violations, inquiries 
from the public, residents and applicants concerning the Commission, the Wetland laws and 
regulations, and procedures of the Commission. Presently the Commission has 
approximately 80 open projects that require monitoring by the Conservation Officer. Each 
Notice of Intent results in a minimum of four site inspections during the life of the project. 
The overall scope of the project and the amount of resource areas impacted by the project 
usually results in additional inspections to determine compliance with the Conditions issued. 
Additional fieldwork is consistent with the number of telephone inquiries and the amount of 
assistance needed by residents and developers concerning possible wetlands issues. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of wetlands protection, the Commission is 
charged by the Conservation Commission Act to actively protect the watershed resources of 
the town and for the promotion and development of the natural resources of the town. The 
Commission can actively pursue the acquisition of land for conservation and passive 
recreation use. The Commission has provided support to the Open Space Committee in its 
efforts to identify and acquire parcels of open land for the Town, and has coordinated with 
the Planning Board in its consideration of subdivisions with significant wetlands 
implications. In 2000 the Commission reviewed a Conservation Restriction from the 
Bridlefield Subdivision off of Granite Street. The Commission received approval from 
town meeting to allow a section of the Holmquist Conservation Land to be used for housing 
of sheep for a local 4-H program. 



51 



The continued efforts of volunteers: Betty Kaerwer, Theresa Cos, John Kelly and Ralph 
Parmigiane, provides the Commission with updates, reviews and inventory of the properties 
under its jurisdiction. This involves marking the boundaries and public access points, 
assessing the general characteristics of each property, and preparing accurate files for each 
property. The Commission has established a "Rules and Regulations" sign for the 
properties in its jurisdiction. Several of the signs have been erected on several sites. 

All members of the Commission attend various workshops and training sessions offered by 
the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Massachusetts Association of 
Conservation Commissioners (MACC) throughout the year. These workshops enable the 
Commissioners to keep current with the most up-to-date information and regulations for 
wetlands protection and land acquisition and management. A "Fundamentals of 
Conservation" Certificate program is offered by MACC. Several Commissioners are 
participating in the Certificate program. I. Lorah Igo has received her Certificate of 
Achievement for completing the "Fundamentals of Conservation" course. 

Aside from their duties as Conservation Commissioners the members serve as 
representatives to other subcommittees. Deborah Bero represents the Conservation 
Commission on the Stormwater Management Committee. Lorah Igo serves on the Open 
Space Committee for the Commission. Michael Perloff continues as the Commission's 
representative on the GIS Committee. This year the Commission established a study group 
to develop guidelines for Conservation Restrictions, easements and trail development. This 
study group is composed of the following: Osier Peterson, Board of Selectmen; George 
Lester, Planning Board; Philip Burr, Conservation Commission; Thomas Caragliano, Park 
& Recreation, Chris Hajjar, Open Space Committee; Lynn Browne, Friends of Forests and 
Trails; and Jeff Montgomery, The Trustees of Reservations. Philip Burr serves as the 
Chairman of the study group. 

The Conservation Commission meets on the first and third Thursdays of the month. The 
Commission generally holds site inspections on weekend mornings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph A. Parmigiane, Chairman 
Mary McCarthy, Vice-Chairman 
Michael Perloff, Vice-Chairman 
Deborah J. Bero 
Philip J. Burr 
I. Lorah Igo 
Beth J. Larkin 

Associate Members: Theresa A. Cos 
Betty A. Kaerwer 
Caroline D. Standley 



52 



OPEN SPACE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Open Space Committee spent a good deal of 2000 continuing to work on the update 
of the town's Open Space and Recreation Plan, which was last revised in 1994. (In 
order to qualify for state funding for open space acquisition, the Commonwealth requires 
that the plan be updated every five years.) Working with the Park and Recreation 
Commission, a detailed questionnaire was sent to all residents of the town asking for 
their input. The analysis of the results has taken a good deal of time but has provided 
much valuable insight and information to the Committee. Preservation of land within 
our aquifer protection district and recharge areas, together with preservation of the 
Medfield State Hospital land, emerged as high community priorities from the 
questionnaire responses. 

An early draft of the updated plan has been circulated for comment to other town boards 
and committees, and a final draft for public comment should be ready in the spring of 
2001. Completion and adoption are planned by the fall. 

It is hoped that a by-product of this process will be the recreation of an updated open 
space and trail map, the most recent edition having been published in 1990. 

The 2000 Goldthwait Award for open space preservation was presented to Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Macleod. The Macleods have lived on North Street for many years. Recognizing 
that their property lay in close proximity to two crucial pieces of open space, (the Rocky 
Woods Reservation and a portion of The Wardner Farm Trust land), the Macleods chose 
to place a conservation restriction on 45 acres of their land. In so doing they have not 
only protected pastures, woodlands, and streams, but have also safeguarded and 
enhanced those neighboring parcels of open space. A vital trail system in the area will 
also be maintained, and the effort to preserve the scenic vistas along the North Street 
entrance to Medfield has moved another giant step forward. 

In the fall the Conservation Commission organized a Trails Committee with additional 
representation from the Planning Board, the Board of Selectmen, the Open Space 
Committee, the Friends of Medfield Forests and Trails, and The Trustees of 
Reservations. This group will look into matters of standards for trail design, layout, and 
usage on Town property, as well as guidelines for conservation restrictions and 
easements granted to the Town. We commend the Conservation Commission for their 
initiative on these important matters and are pleased to be a part of this effort. 

As usual, we continue to work with the Conservation Commission, the Friends of 
Medfield Forests and Trails, the Bay Circuit Alliance, the Medfield State Hospital 
Preservation Committee, the Upper Charles Conservation land trust, and similar groups 



53 



throughout the region on areas of mutual interest and concern. We thank them for their 

support. 

Once again we must acknowledge with gratitude the assistance of many others who also 
serve the Town, in particular the Board of Selectmen, Michael Sullivan, and Kristine 
lrierweiler. We welcome input from all the residents of Medfield and encourage you to 
get in touch with us to share your knowledge and suggestions. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Jonathan Bennett 
Philip Bun- 
Chris Hajjar 
Lorah Igo 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Eric O'Brien 
Martha Smick 
Caroline Standley 
David Wang 




Conservation Commission Introduces New Signage 



54 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission is appointed by the board of selectmen. Our job is 
to identify and protect Medfield' s historical and archaeological assets. We make sure 
historic preservation is considered in community planning and development decisions. 
The commission has an annual budget of $2,500, and it has certain statutory authority. 
Its monthly meetings in the town hall are open to the public. 

(The Medfield Historical Society, with which the commission is often confused, is a 
private, not-for-profit organization of history buffs.) 

Here's what the Medfield Historical Commission did in 2000: 

Architectural History Booklet 

We really liked the work Kathleen Kelly Broomer did in preparing Medfield' s Historic 
Preservation Plan in 1999, so we asked her to expand and update our popular Walking 
Tour of Medfield brochure. The result is a substantial booklet of some 32 pages about 
the history and architecture of the houses and other structures near the center of town, 
written in Broomer' s highly readable style. The booklets are available at the 350 th shop 
in the Dwight Derby House, at the library, Lord's, and real estate offices. 

House Date Signs 

Many residents ask how to get a date sign for their house. The procedure is simple: 

1. Submit your request in the form of a brief note to the Medfield Historical 
Commission. Attach copies of documentation (such as property records from the 
Registry of Deeds in Dedham) showing when the house was built and the name of 
the original owner. 

2. If it believes the information is accurate, the historical commission will approve your 
request. 

3. Take the letter to Abell Sign, 37 Janes Avenue. The homeowner pays for the sign. 

Demolition Delay 

Medfield residents all agree that they moved here for the quality of the town, and the 
historic buildings are important in enhancing that quality. When an old house is torn 
down and replaced by a new one, some of that attractive quality is lost. Medfield is one 
of only 42 Massachusetts communities with a demolition delay bylaw; ours was adopted 
at the 1993 town meeting. The bylaw prescribes hearings and other procedures to assure 
that no historically significant building more than 50 years old is demolished before 
serious efforts have been made to rehabilitate or restore it. In 1994 the law was 



55 



expanded to protect archaeologically sensitive areas, and in 1998 the law was amended 
to allow up to a one-year delay, like Newton, Arlington, and Brookline. 

Thanks to the one-year provision, the commission was able to score its first-ever win in 
2000! A developer sought to demolish everything on the old Sauer farm at 62 Bridge 
Street. The commission felt the farm provided a worthwhile link to Medfield's agrarian 
past, and we negotiated a compromise with the developer. We secured a preservation 
casement on the land within 50 feet of the Charles River - it must be preserved in its 
natural state - and the barn was preserved. In return, we allowed the developer to 
demolish promptly all the other, less significant buildings on the property. 

Historic Preservation Award 

The 2000 Historic Preservation Award was gratefully presented to Gallagher and 
McCullough, Inc., for restoring the 1878 William Fales house at Camden Park, 140 
North Street, and building architecturally-compatible and economically necessary 
condominia in place of the dilapidated barn behind it. The other bidders sought to 
demolish the main house and build more condos. 

Medfield Archaeological Advisory Committee (MAAC) 

The Medfield Archaeology Advisory Committee was formed in 1 993 as a subcommittee 
of the Medfield Historical Commission. It was formed to help protect archaeologically- 
sensitive areas in town. 






MAAC members are John Thompson, Chairman; Electa Tritsch; Charlotte Reinemann; 
Robert Naughton; Barbara Palson; Debbie Gaines; C. B. Doub; Jackie Wile; Barbara 
Leighton; and Burgess Standley. 

Activities of the committee include: 

• maintaining a map prepared under the direction of the committee indicating 
archaeologically- sensitive areas of historic and prehistoric interest within the town; 

• helping protect sensitive sites by participating in evaluations of site potential and site 
walkovers; evaluating and registering artifacts; enlisting the aid of wider archaeological 
resources and professionals, such as the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
archaeologists, the Massachusetts Archaeological Society, and the Robbins Museum 
staff in Middleborough, MA; 

• presenting town-wide educational events and information for townspeople on 
archaeology and historic preservation; ongoing organized educational program to learn 
methods of archaeological survey under supervision. Since 1997, MAAC has conducted 
archaeological field activities on town property supervised by a volunteer professional 
archaeologist. During 1998, MAAC held monthly public meetings to discuss the 
activities of the committee and to plan fieldwork and educational events. 

The following activities highlight the 2000 achievements of the MAAC: 



56 



In May, MAAC conducted a field tour of the geology and archaeology of Medfield. 
Beginning in Rocky Woods, the group visited several important geological features in 
the town, and the locations of some probable archaeological sites. 

MAAC members worked with the Medfield Historical Commission on reviewing and 
documenting the history of a property on Bridge Street. MAAC made several visits to 
the property and prepared drawings, maps and photographs of the property prior to 
demolition. 

In October, MAAC participated in the statewide "Archaeology Week" by coordinating a 
Native American speaking engagement at the Medfield Public Library. The presentation 
was interesting and informative and was well attended. 

In the fall, MAAC became involved with a property for sale that is included on the 
sensitive site map. MAAC continues to work with the realtor to protect any sensitive 
portion of the property from damage during the development process. 

How about you? 

If you're interested in Medfield's history, call any of the members, or show up at one of 
our monthly meetings, which are open to the public. If you like what you see, you can 
become an associate member of the commission or MAAC and share in some of the 
projects. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Temple, Chair 
Monica Bushnell 
Mary Preikszas 
Charlotte Reinemann 
Richard Reinemann 
Burgess P. Standley 
Ancelin Wolfe 



57 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



[o the Honorable Board of Selectman 
and Residents of Medfield 



OVERVIEW 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's four Historic Districts: 

• The John Metcalf Historic District established in 1989 on West Main Street and 
enlarged in 1996. 

• The Hospital Farm Historic District established in 1994. 

• The Clark-Kingsbury Farm Historic District established in 1997. 

• The Medfield Town Center Historic District established in 2000 



PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing body is granted 
under the Historic District Act of 1960, Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40C. The 
purpose of the law is threefold: 

• to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of buildings and places 
significant in the history of the Commonwealth and its cities and towns 

• to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places 

• to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the district 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to protect the 
character of historic areas. Town-appointed Local Historic Commissions govern such 
districts. Since each property owner within a district contributes to the overall historic 
character, changes proposed for the exterior of any property, as well as new 
construction, are considered in light of the impact they may have on the district as a 
whole. Before a property owner within a district is allowed to change an exterior 
architectural feature of a building, the owner must receive approval from the Local 
Historic Commission. Approval is in the form of a certificate of appropriateness, 
hardship or non-applicability with respect to such construction or alteration. 

There are now Local Historic Districts in over one hundred Massachusetts towns and 
cities. Historic Districts do not prevent changes from occurring, nor do they prevent new 
construction. The intent of any Local Historic District is not to halt growth, but to allow 
for thoughtful consideration of change, to allow changes and additions that are 
harmonious, and prevent the intrusion of incongruous elements that might distract from 
the aesthetic and historic values of the district. Local Historic District Commissions have 



58 



authority only over the portion of the exterior of a building that can be seen from a 
public street, way or park. The Commission's Guidelines for Changes within Medfield 
Local Historic Districts is available upon request. 



HISTORIC DISTRICTS IN MEDFIELD 

Medfield passed "Historic Districts", Article 14 of the bylaws, and created the John 
Metcalf Historic District through a vote of the 1989 annual Town Meeting. This first 
district included for historic houses on west Main Street and included the oldest portion 
of Vine Lake Cemetery. Through a vote of the annual Town Meeting in 1996, the John 
Metcalf Historic District was enlarged to include a total of sixteen historic buildings. 

The Town established a second historic district, The Hospital Farm Historic District, in 
1994. It includes 33 buildings at the Medfield State Hospital, and the surrounding 
historic landscape. The buildings were built at the turn of this century, mostly in the 
Queen Anne Revival style, and are grouped around a large quadrangle, resembling the 
campus of a small college. 

In 1997, the Clark- Kingsbury Farm Historic District, Medfield' s third district, was 
established. It provides protection to the historic and unique grouping of the 18 th century 
Clark-Kingsbury farmhouse, outbuildings and pond with gristmill that forms a widely 
appreciated and essential part of the rural character of Medfield. 

In April of 2000, the Medfield Town Center Historic District was created by unanimous 
vote of Town Meeting. This proposed district is intended to preserve and protect the 
character of the Center of the town of Medfield. 

The Town Center of Medfield is important for its mix of civic, commercial, and 
residential properties. Each category has an integral function in the town and over the 
years as the town has developed, each building, in its own unique way, has been 
significant in the developing character of the Town Center. While the other historic 
districts in Medfield are primarily residential, an unusual aspect of this proposed historic 
district is the concentration of civic and commercial buildings in addition to its 
residential ones. Historically, where the civic buildings provided the center of town 
government, education, religious and social activity, the industrial and commercial 
buildings served as the hub of Medfield's active and developing economy. 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 

The Proposed Medfield Town Center Historic District was accepted at Town 
Meeting in April of 2000. 



59 



• The Commission is extremely grateful to the time committed by Bradley Phipps, one 
of our members, who resigned this year. We also welcome Michael Taylor, a former 
Commission member who has returned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David Sharff, Chair 
Barbara Jacobs 
Burgess Standley 
Connie Sweeney 
Michael Taylor 




350"' Anniversary Cemetery Tour 



60 



KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Keepers of the Town Clock are pleased to submit their annual report for the year 
2000. 

The Town Clock is in excellent condition. I have performed an annual overhaul that 
included degreasing and repacking the clock bearings. Teflon spray was added to all 
brass bushings in the second story drive train and to the minute wheels inside the four 
faces. Once the drive shaft was conditioned, the loud thumping noise inhabiting the 
belfry ceased. 

Co-Keeper David Maxson installed an uninterruptible power supply graciously donated 
by American Power Conversion Corporation. With this addition to the Town Clock, the 
keeper's job of resetting the clock after power outages has markedly decreased. In fact, 
only on two occasions was it necessary to reset the hands due to extended power 
outages. Co-Keeper David Maxson also gave approximately a dozen tours of the clock 
to interested parties. 

The Keepers of the Town Clock would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and the 
citizens of Medfield for preserving the Clock as a reminder of the Town's past. In the 
future we will continue to maintain the Clock and to keep it as reliable as the new Town 
Clock in front of the Town House. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marc R. Tishler 
David P. Maxson 
Co-Keepers of the Town Clock 




TOWN CLOCK 



61 



350 th ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 



May, 2001 marks Medfield' s 350 th anniversary of incorporation as a town. The 350 th 
Anniversary Committee was appointed by the Selectmen following the 1997 Annual 
Town Meeting to plan a celebration to commemorate this occasion. After more than a 
year of planning, including surveying local residents (who expressed a clear preference 
for a full year-long calendar of events) and talking with others who had been responsible 
for comparable undertakings, we returned to Town Meeting in 1999 with a request, 
unanimously granted, for $ 1 1 7,700 in town funds to finance our celebration. Now, at 
long last, our year is here. 

The festivities started in September, 2000 with a gala dinner dance under the stars (and a 
very large tent) beside Meeting House Pond. Chair Geralyn Warren and her committee 
planned a magical evening whose sights and sounds will linger in memory long after the 
year is over. When tickets for the event sold out immediately the previous spring, a 
number of residents made plans for their own parties the same evening, so it was truly a 
night for celebrations across town. 

October saw the opening of the 1651 Shoppe. the anniversary store located in the 
Dwight-Derby House. The product of a happy collaboration with the Friends of the 
Dwight-Derby House, the store features a creative mix of Medfield memorabilia and 
other gift items and will be open through December, 2001 under the direction of co- 
chairs Gail Currier, Don Gabor, and Tanya Bouwman. A special feature of the opening 
was the first public display of the stunning anniversary quilt created by Chair Pauline 
Goucher and her team of talented needlewomen. 

Volunteers turned out in force on a sunny Saturday in October for a town wide planting 
effort that saw 200 trees and more than 350 dozen daffodils installed at schools, parks, 
the cemetery, and other public areas across town. Thanks to the advance planning and 
preparation of the Tree and Daffodil Committees chaired by Mark Wilson and Brandi 
Erb and a wonderful response from community groups and individuals (including the 
Medfield Garden Club, which donated all the bulbs), all the planting was finished by 
noon! Another planting day will be scheduled in 2001 to complete the installation of the 
350 new trees planned as a lasting memory of our celebration. In the meantime, we look 
forward to seeing all those daffodils in bloom this spring. Whether you were able to 
help out by getting your hands dirty in October or not, we ask townspeople to consider 
financial contributions to this effort either by making a donation to the tree fund or by 
purchasing a tree for planting on your own property (advance orders, a portion of which 
will benefit the fund). 



62 



Rounding out October was a lantern-lit stroll back through 350 years of Medfield history 
at Vine Lake Cemetery led by town historian Richard DeSorgher. Three hundred and 
fifty tour-takers braved frigid temperatures to see vivid glimpses of the past reenacted by 
members of the Medfield High School Theatre Society and adult volunteers. All 
appeared to develop a new appreciation both for the struggles and accomplishments of 
our predecessors and the toll time has taken on our "neighborhood" cemetery. If you 
missed last year's tour, you'll have another opportunity this October. 

Our schedule for the year 2000 concluded with the 350 th Anniversary Holiday House 
Tour. Thanks to the generosity of the five homeowners — the Taylor, Martin, Ferullo, 
Parsons, and Bonoldi families — and the meticulous planning efforts of Chair Connie 
Jones and her committee, visitors had the opportunity to travel through four centuries of 
Medfield' s architectural history. The five homes beautifully decorated for the season 
included the 1652 Metcalf Homestead, 589 Main Street; Longacre Farm, the 1740 
Cheney/Ellis House, 101 Main Street; Wayfield, 348 North Street, 1750; Quinnapin, 41 1 
Main Street, c. 1880; and the 1960 "Arts and Crafts" house at 45 Pound Street. 

So far 2001 has seen an "Antiques Roadshow" style event coordinated by the local 
chapter of Questers, at which hundreds had a chance to have their treasures (real or 
imagined) appraised by the professionals from Skinner Auction Gallery, and the opening 
of an exhibition of 60 Medfield-inspired works of art at the Zullo Gallery. As the year 
unfolds, it will include several weeks in February and March of "Sharing Faith in 
Medfield at all the local churches, birdwalks, a vintage clothing exhibit, a concert for our 
younger residents, and even a competition and display of floral arrangements. 

Among the highlights of the year, which you should mark on your calendars now, will 
be a spectacular parade on June 2 with, we hope, a float for every organization in town; 
an old-fashioned "birthday faire" with evening fireworks on October 6; and a wrap-up 
"Last Night" celebration on New Year's Eve. All three events are huge undertakings 
dependent on the contributions of many dozens of volunteers. If you haven't yet joined 
one of our many committees for these or other events, please consider doing so 
immediately! 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who has helped bring our 
celebration this far — the town employees at Town Hall and elsewhere; the Police and 
Fire Chiefs and their departments; the Medfield Cultural Council, a local agency 
supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency, for its support of the 
cemetery and house tours; First Parish Unitarian Church; the local organizations who, 
like the Medfield Historical Society, have planned their activities for the year to 
complement our efforts; and everyone who has served on a committee, written a check, 
or donated goods or services. We are trying to make good use of the town funds 
entrusted to us and are hoping to return as much as possible of the 1999 appropriation to 
the general fund at the end of the year. Almost all of our events so far have been 
fundraisers, but the major events planned for the rest of this year all will depend on 
separate contributions to be fully realized. If you or your organization or business can 
help, please contact Fundraising Chair Lucille Fisher. 



63 



With so many more events of all kinds still to come, there truly is a place for everyone to 
participate, at every level of commitment. Please join us! Call one of the committee 
members, drop us a line, or stop by one of our meetings (full committee meetings are the 
first Thursday of the month at the Dwight-Derby House at 7:30 p.m.; subcommittee 
times vary). Just don't let the parade pass you by. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Nancy Temple Horan, Chairman 

Mathew Arnold 

Richard P. DeSorgher 

Edward P. Doherty 

Brandi Erb 

Lucille Fisher 

Mark Fisher 

Pam Frawley 

Pauline M. Goucher 

Beverly L. Hallowell 

Nancy Temple Horan 

Richard Hurley 

Connie Jones 

William Kingsbury 

Alison Lopez 



William H. Mann 
Jimmy McCloud 
Gayle Currier 
Beth Oliphant 
Cheryl O'Malley 
Edward A. Otting 
Osier Peterson 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Megan Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Alice Wheeler 
Gordon Youlden 




Honoring Our Past - Celebrating Our Future 
1651 - 2001 



64 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is my pleasure to submit the 2000 annual report for the Medfield Memorial Public 
Library. This was another busy year with circulation rising to 173,878, which placed 
Medfield 8 th out of 49 libraries in our population group in Massachusetts. To improve 
public access, the library increased the Sunday schedule, which had been October 
through March, by adding Sunday afternoon hours in April. 

Development of the library collections continued, with emphasis being placed on adult 
nonfiction, children's collections and a major expansion of young adult materials. The 
adult large print, paperback, video, music compact disc, and books on tape collections 
were also significantly expanded. Over 7,000 new items were added to the collections. 
A major emphasis was also placed on improving availability of titles in high demand by 
buying more copies. The Friends of the Library "2000 Books" campaign was very 
successful so that an additional 2000 books will be purchased in 2001-02 to further 
expand the book collections. 

The reference department experienced another busy year. Besides answering reference 
questions, providing reader's advisory service, and offering research assistance, an 
emphasis was placed on one-to-one instruction on navigating the Internet. 
Troubleshooting computer problems was also a constant through the year. The 
Dictionary of Literary Biography and The Grove Dictionary of Art were added to the 
reference databases available to the public. Reference staff worked with school libraries 
to supplement curriculum needs of students. 

While being busier than ever, the circulation department staff maintained a welcoming 
and friendly demeanor. Staff helped individuals in finding "good reads" and with 
general information and assistance. Circulation staff were also busy scheduling the 
meeting rooms which were used by 324 non-library groups during the year. 

Perhaps the most interesting area of the library was the children's department. Children's 
Librarians, Ann Russo and Jean Todesca, successfully managed a myriad of programs 
during the course of the year. Musical performances, puppet shows, a summer reading 
program, evening PJ storytimes, and programs for parents made for an event-filled year. 
This was in addition to the four 8 week storytime programs, held on a daily basis, 
throughout the year. Staffing was increased during evening hours to provide better 
service to the many children and adults using the children's department. In addition to 
increasing and enhancing the book collections with a special emphasis on reference and 
biography, a major effort was made to strengthen the music and CD-ROM collections. 
A new program of photographing and displaying the photos of children who receive 
their first library cards, called "Our Stars", was especially successful. 



65 



Installation of additional lighting for the adult stack area of the lower level was the main 
physical change in the building this year. The area is now much brighter and individuals 
find it easier to study and locate materials. Additional security cameras were also 
installed in the lower level stack area. The local chapter of the Lions Club donated a 
magnifying reader for the visually impaired. The children's department added a range of 
shelving for the growing fiction collection and revamped the preschool area. 

After 30 years of service, Jane Archer retired as library director. Jane was instrumental 
in the successful campaign for the new library. Without Jane's leadership, the Medfield 
Public Library would not be the strong community-based institution it is today. Carolyn 
O'Leary ably served as acting director for several months during the search for a new 
director. At the end of April, Dan Brassell became the new library director. 

Under the leadership of Kathy Simon and a strong, enthusiastic Board, the Friends of the 
Library made many contributions to the library in the course of the year. As always, the 
Friends underwrote the children's storytimes and special programs. The Friends 
continued to improve the decor of the children's department by adding a new train set, 
play kitchen area, and new display racks for toddler boardbooks in the preschool area. 
They also purchased new books, book trucks, computer printers and other furniture and 
equipment for the library. Kathy Brennan spearheaded and was the driving force behind 
the very successful "2000 Books" campaign, which will greatly enhance the library's 
book collections. 

The Library Endowment Fund, under the direction of a five member Board chaired by 
Diane Jurmain, saw another year of growth in funds and service to the library. Through 
donations from the fund, the adult large print collection, young adult collection, and 
children's collections were expanded. 

The many individuals who volunteered to work in the library were greatly appreciated 
by both staff and public. Volunteers served in both the circulation and children's 
departments. Local Girl Scout troops conducted craft and story time programs for 
preschool through early elementary children. Middle school students did evening 
storytimes for five weeks. Numerous individuals assisted in shelving returned materials 
for the circulation department. 



ANNUAL STATISTICS 

New Library Materials Added 7,315 Total Materials Owned 56,098 

Circulation of Materials 173,878 Number of Registered Borrowers 8,096 



Respectfully submitted, 

Dan Brassell 
Library Director 



66 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The Trustees of the Memorial Library are pleased to submit their annual report for the 
year 2000. 

The millennium celebrates our second year in our widely used facility. The Library not 
only serves an ever-increasing number of patrons, but also has become a welcome 
addition as a meeting place for various town groups and committees. We again find 
ourselves with overall increases in circulation, new acquisitions and in-house programs. 
Here are both new and continuing trends that impact Library services: 

Continued Growth in Circulation 

The total circulation of our in -house collection continues to grow. The circulation for 
fiscal year 2000 was 1,173,878. The first 5 months of FY2001 show a 6.5% increase in 
circulation as compared to the same period in FY2000. Data from FY2000 showed that 
Medfield ranked 9 th highest in Total Circulation as compared with 49 towns in the 
population range of 10,000-14,999. The board sees this as a continuing trend. 

Increased Energy Costs 

As utility costs continue to rise, we have added 10-15% increases in electrical and gas 
expenditures into our budget for the coming fiscal year. 

Demands on Collection Development 

During the past decade patrons have expressed concerns about the lack of resources 
available at the library as compared with surrounding communities. With the increasing 
demands for current titles, CD's, DVD's and video, the collection needs to be increased 
accordingly. During FY2000 there were 7,153 items added to the collection. The 
Library also is required to maintain a percentage of our total budget for new materials as 
mandated to receive state aid and maintain our certification. We continue to meet the 
minimum levels for state certification. 

Requests for Extended Hours During the School Year and Staff Coverage for 
Entire Facility 

There have been many requests from the public for longer hours and more staffing. The 
Library conducted a survey in October 2000, which showed an increase in Sunday hours 
to be the most requested change in library hours. Also, there is currently no staff 
coverage on the lower level. This is an area we would like to address in the coming year. 

Technology Impact 

With ever increasing demands on our Internet terminals, the Trustees will continue to 
review the best way to deliver this service to accommodate the needs of the community. 



67 



1 he use of the Internet as a valuable reference resource will continue to present new 
challenges on traditional library services. 

The Board of Trustees would like to recognize the tremendous support and contributions 
of the Friends of the Library. During the year 2000, the Friends launched a campaign to 
add 2000 new books to the Library. This campaign was enormously successful. The 
Board is grateful to them for their continued support. 

Dan Brassell became the new Director of the Library this past year and has proven to be 
an invaluable addition to our facility and community. He has been and inspiring force 
behind collection development on all levels of print and media. We feel fortunate to have 
him direct and guide us into the new millennium with all its challenges. 

Under the leadership of Jim Whalen, the Long Range Planning Committee has submitted 
a new 5-year plan. It highlights the needs of the community for increased hours and 
staffing, demands on the collection and future development, as well as issues with new 
technology and its impact. We appreciate all the hard work and long hours this 
committee has put in to provide us with direction and purpose. 



Respectfully Submitted, 




Inside the 350* Shoppe at the Dwight Derby House 



68 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 



The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its twelfth Annual Report. 
During the year we continued to work towards the completion of the Baxter Park project. 
In January we cut off the date for the ordering of memorial and honor bricks, which will 
go in the walkways inside the park. One walkway will be of a civilian nature, with 
donated bricks bearing the names of individual residents, families, business, civic 
groups, etc. A second walkway, to be known as the "Veterans' Honor Walk," will 
contain bricks bearing the name of veterans. The Veterans* Honor Walk," will connect 
the existing World War II with the new monuments around the flagpole. Over 600 bricks 
were purchased. Honor bricks were donated in the name of veterans from every branch 
of the service and for those serving in every war from the Mexican-American War 
through the Gulf War. It is the goal of our committee to have the walkways completed 
by Memorial Day, 2001. At which time we also hope to dedicate the Korean War and 
Vietnam War Memorials. 

During the past year an additional Colonial Lamp Post in Baxter Park was donated in 
memory of Gerry Underwood, longtime Medfield resident, veteran and former 
Commander to the Beckwith Post 110. Also during the year Richard DeSorgher stepped 
down as committee chairman, a position he had held continuously since the founding of 
the committee twelve years ago. DeSorgher will remain on the committee as a member. 
Joining the committee was Frank Iafolla and Veterans' Agent G. Marshall Chick. Chick 
was elected committee chairman. 

Our committee received the death of committee member Clifford "Gerry" Doucette, with 
great sadness. Gerry was the clerk of works with the Baxter Park project. His dedication, 
work ethic, care and concern for people was the driving force behind the work 
undertaken at Baxter Park. It was also through a great deal of time and research that 
Gerry was able to finalize as complete a list as is possible, of those who served in the 
Vietnam War. A memorial bench, donated by the many friends of Gerry, will be located 
near the Korean War Memorial, the war in which he so nobly served, upon completion 
of the park. Our committee, along with the town, will forever miss this very dedicated 
public servant, but most of all we will miss a very special friend. 

We wish to sincerely thank the many individual town residents and the civic and 
business community for their support. We also wish to make note of the support of the 
Highway Department, the Park and Recreation Commission, the Medfield Garden Club, 
the Medfield Girl Scouts under the leadership of Donna Andrews, Mike Sullivan and the 
Town Hall staff, and Lueders Landscaping. We also wish a special note of thanks and 



69 



appreciation to June Doucette of the Town Hall staff who continues to assist us by 
keeping track of all monies received. In light of the many donations, memorial bricks 
and state and town grants, this is a sizeable amount of financial record keeping. Our 
committee would not be able to function without the volunteer help we have received 
from June. 

Respectfully submitted. 



G. Marshall Chick, chairman 

Richard P. DeSorgher 

Frank Iafolla 

Jane M. Lomax 

David F. Temple 

Robert A. Kinsman, associate member 




350 th Anniversary Tree Planting 



70 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

I hereby submit my first report as Veterans' Agent for the Town Medfield. 

Due to the passing of Clifford G, Doucette, the Board of Selectmen appointed me as 
Director, Agent and Burial Agent effective June 1, 2000. I will strive to continue to 
serve our veterans and their families in the same caring and efficient manner that Gerry 
did in this capacity for the past six years. 

Veterans' services include helping the Veteran with benefits when needed, 
hospitalization, pension assistance, information on education, social security and burial 
allowances. This assistance includes fuel, food, clothing, housing and medical expenses 
for Veterans and their families. Also available are applications for Veteran License 
Plates and the Korean War Service Medal for service in Korea between June 25, 1950 to 
July 27,1953. 

Services and assistance rendered Medfield Veterans and their dependents are authorized 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The Commonwealth reimburses the Town 
seventy-five percent of the benefits extended. 

I wish to thank Town officials and especially June Doucette for their assistance and 
helpfulness in this year of transition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Marshall Chick 
VETERANS' AGENT 



71 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 

Given by LDCR Jack A. Peterson USNR 

Good morning and welcome to this Memorial Day, the 29 th day of May in the year 2000. 
Commander Ted Miller Beckwith Post 110, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen. 
M\ talk this morning is dedicated to a fallen comrade in arms, Clifford Doucette (Gerry) 
who has done so much for the veterans of Medfield in establishing the memorials here in 
Baxter Park. Each Memorial Day we take time to remember and honor the veterans as 
heroes on this their special day. 

Lest We Forget 

The time and dates in history of great wars and those who sacrificed their lives are 
only remembered in history books. Men have fallen, died, and given their lives for their 
country. Men and women have fought many wars to keep freedom alive. It had been 
said so many years ago by Thomas Jefferson that freedom is a costly word. Freedom is 
a word in which we ourselves lay our lives down for its purpose. In this country 
freedom has been our word as far back as the Revolutionary war and beyond. 

One must remember within the span of time and freedom being preserved, men and 
women have died for that purpose. I am going to quote to you from Theodore Roosevelt 
"there can be no 50/50 Americanism in this country. There is room here for only 100% 
Americanism, only for those who are Americans and nothing else". 

There have been so many quotes and so many speeches commemorating Memorial 
Day. What brings to mind and task are the words "Lest We Forget". The annals of time 
wipe away the vivid scars of war. The American flags fly this day above the graves of 
men and women who have given their lives so that we enjoy the freedom that has been 
preserved by the giving of their lives. 

What cost freedom? What sacrifice? What do we give to preserve it? Abraham 
Lincoln had said that between two factors, the North and the South there is doubt. For a 
country divided will lose liberty and freedom. And so in turn on this the 29 th day in 
May, Memorial Day, we honor those who have given their lives to protect and defend 
freedom. 

What cost freedom? As it had been written in the preamble of the Constitution of the 
United States — We the people of the United States in order to form a more perfect 
union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense. 
And that is what we have been doing for well over 200 years. And in that span of time, 
lives have been given to protect and defend the costly word — Freedom. 

From the sands of Iwo Jima to the beaches of Normandy, a total global war. Our 
freedom was in peril and to protect our freedom with a call to arms. America is a 
peaceful country large in scope, as we all know. So on this special day, we pay homage 



72 



to the men and women who have given their lives so that we can enjoy the bountiful 
pleasures of freedom. 

Lest we forget 

As we realize this day the true cost of freedom and so in closing, take pride in 
Baxter Park and the memorial to the men and women who have served in just causes to 
protect and defend our freedoms. As we look about us as to the many names that are 
inscribed on the Memorials, they have given their lives so that we can stand here this 
morning paying homage to their sacrifice in the name of freedom. 

Lest We Forget. 

Thank you. 







Baxter Park 



73 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year of 2000 found the Board of Health members focusing their attention 
on a variety of areas. The major focus surrounded the issue of two board members 
moving away from Medfield, therefore resigning their positions. The current board 
would like to thank Nancy Silva, Ph.D., MPH and Evan Wilmarth, CSE for their many 
years of dedication to public health issues in Medfield. 

The Medfield Board of Health welcomed two new members and an Associate member to 
the board. Edith Herbeck, RN, MS, and Catherine Steever, ME, BS joined the board as 
new members. Fred Clarridge, M.Ed, joined as an associate. All the new members 
attended and were certified by the Massachusetts Association of Health Boards 
certification class this past fall. We welcome their expertise and time. 

Federal and State regulations were developed and/or updated this past year. Areas such 
as water testing at Hinkley Swim Pond, Food Handling Certification for all restaurants 
or sandwich shops, mandatory inspections and qualifications for recreational camps have 
increased the visibility of the Board of Health and its agents. 



Environmental Engineering 

In 2000, the major focus continued to be the implementation of Title 5 for septic systems 
that needed to be upgraded as a result of the inspection at time of home sale 
requirements, as well as prevention of non-point source pollution through enforcement 
of stormwater regulations for subdivision and site plan proposals and subsequent 
construction. Sixty Title 5 inspection reports were received during 2000. To assist 
homeowners to minimize the financial burden, the Board of Health issues local and state 
variances as needed to achieve Maximum Feasible Compliance. These variances have to 
be justified by the applicant's system designer based upon difficult site conditions or 
excessive system costs. Guidelines for obtaining such variances are available at the 
Board of Health office. In addition to complete upgrades, 10 systems have required 
minor remediation such as replacement of the distribution box or deficient piping. 

The following is a summary of the reviews and inspections performed by the consulting 
engineer/agent in 2000: 



On-site soil test applications 12 

Septic system plans submitted 

New construction 4 

Upgrades 1 

Construction Inspections 84 



74 



Repair Permits Issued 10 

Installers Permits Issued 25 

Subdivision/Project Reviews 2 

Well Permits 1 

Septage Handler's and Carter' Permits Issued 12 

Swimming Pool Reviews (private) 9 

Review of plans for additions and renvoations 63 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

Jean Sniffin, RN, BA of the Natick Visiting Nurses Association, attended several 
seminars this past year to keep her up to date on important issues to aid the residents and 
community of Medfield. 

The Natick Area VNA provides programs in health promotion to all age groups in 
addition to traditional home health services. The four major components of the Health 
Promotion Program are: 

Health Maintenance for the Elderly: Promotion of good health and maximum 
functioning for all residents over 60 years of age. Elderly residents who are homebound 
and have multiple chronic illnesses or conditions but do not qualify for skilled care in the 
Home Health Program are seen on a periodic basis by a nurse at home. The goal of the 
program is to assess changes in physical condition, prevent complications and prevent 
unnecessary hospitalizations. Ambulatory residents are seen for physical assessment and 
health counseling at the senior citizens clinics held at the Pfaff Center on the first 
Tuesday of every month, at Tilden Village on the third Tuesday of every month. Nurse 
Sniffin also provides home visits as needed. 

Maternal/Child Health: Promotion of the health and stability of the family during the 
periods of reproductive maturation, pregnancy, childbirth, the postpartum period and the 
child rearing years. Services are provided by a maternal/child health nurse specialist and 
lactation consultant through home visits. 

Communicable Disease 2000: Prevention and control of communicable disease through 
caseloading, referrals, and education and provision of follow up care consistent with 
public health practice. Lyme disease and other tick borne diseases received a lot of 
attention in 2000, as well as follow-up on gastrointestinal diseases. 

Public Health 2000: Promotion of good health awareness for the prevention of serious 
illness. Hypertension screenings are held during the clinics at the Pfaff Center and 
Tilden Village. Residents are welcome to ask the nurse any health promotion questions 
at these clinics. 

Due to the lack of availability of the influenza vaccine, the flu clinics were held 
continuously during October - January 2001. Four hundred and seventy doses were 



75 



given to the elderly, high risk individuals, and the general public during these clinics. 
1 be Board of 1 lealth not only wants to thank Jean Sniffin, RN, but also Marybeth 
Seanlon. RN, and Rohm Pignataro, RN. These nurses, associated with the Natick 
Visting Nurse Association helped the Medfield Board of Health tremendoulsy, on a last 
minute basis We also want to thank a local resident, Jean Brown. Jean assisted during 
the clinics with paperwork and client assistance. The pneumonia vaccine was also 
ottered again this year. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health statistics for 2000 are as follows: 

SERVICE VISITS 

Office Visits (Town Hall) 380 

Blood Pressure Clinics (Pfaff Center & Tilden Village 543 

Communicable Disease Follow-up 40 

Flu Vaccine 430 

Pneumonia Vaccine 79 

Home Visits & Community Health 53 

The Medfield Board of Health distributed over 1 000 doses of influenza vaccine to local 
providers for Medfield residents to be vaccinated against the flu. 

Hepatitis B vaccine was provided to all Medfield firefighters, police, and EMTs. 
Medfield' s Wastewater Treatment Plant operators where vaccinated against Hepatitis A. 
These vaccines are provided for free to the Board of Health through the Department of 
Public Health. 



HUMAN HEALTH SERVICES 

With funding through the Medfield Board of Health, the South Norfolk County 
Association for Retarded Citizens ("SNARC") provides and supports services to citizens 
of Medfield who are mentally retarded. The Association is a non-profit, membership- 
based organization of more than 500 members, governed by family members of those we 
service, including community residents on the Board of Directors. 

Created in 1954 and governed today by several hundred local families with children 
disabled by mental retardation, South Norfolk County Association for retarded Citizens, 
Inc. (SNCARC) is a self-help grass roots organization motivated by local needs. We are 
the voice and heart of advocacy for mental retardation for our 12 local towns. As a 
home-grown, non-profit organization, we have always been accountable to, and 
dependent on, local financial and volunteer supports. Our job has been to use this 
platform of local support to advocate for and draw into our communities other public 
and private resources needed to serve the needs of our neighbors who are disabled by 
mental retardation. 



76 



South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens applies these local supports to 
provide services which include: family support programs encompassing case 
management, emergency and clinical services, our Family Autism Center, consultation 
and training and in-home respite care services. Also included are the educational and 
rehabilitative day programs, which continue the work of the school department, and the 
adult and after-school social and recreational programs which provide several social 
clubs and special events, evening educational classes, discussion groups and a variety of 
sports activities. We also operate through our related party organization, Lifeworks, a 
range of residential and vocational training programs. 

The support from our local communities has provided the funding base from which we 
have always operated. This local support, control and accountability well serves local 
needs in a highly cost efficient manner. By pooling the requests with the funding given 
by the other 1 1 towns to your local Association for Retarded Citizens, Medfield is able 
to achieve a cost efficiency which allows them to do more for its mentally retarded 
citizens than it could individually. We believe it a testament to this good financial sense 
as well as the good works performed by SNCARC, that each of the 12 towns we serve 
continue to provide this funding support as they have done for so many years. 

The following services have been provided this past year to Medfield individuals and 
families: 



PROGRAM 


# SERVED 


Day Habilitation 


1 


Family Support/Respite Care 


22 


Family Autism 


13 


Harbor Counseling 


3 


Social/Recreation 


5 


Advocacy 


31 


Residential 





Residential-Individual Support 


2 


Vocational Training/Transport 


4 



The Association's work is grounded in its Mission Statement: 

"To advocate for and provide support and services to people disabled by 
mental retardation and other developmental disabilities and to their 
families." 

Medfield residents desiring these services for their family member with mental 
retardation or other developmental disability should contact the South Norfolk County 
Association for Retarded Citizens at (508) 359-5546, or (781) 762-4001. The 
Association welcomes visits from interested persons to its community-based programs. 



77 



On behalf of the individuals with mental retardation and their families who reside in 
Medfield, we wish to thank you for your support over the many years of our partnership. 

TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 

The Board of Health, in conjunction with the Boards of Health of Dover, Needham, and 
Westwood, was awarded a three year contract annualized at $72,396.31 from the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health for the Tobacco Control Program. The 
Program's activities are supported by the Health Protection Fund established upon 
passage of voter referendum Question 1 (Tobacco Excise Tax) in November, 1992. 

Key elements of the Tobacco Control Program include: 

D Policy development and enforcement of regulations regarding 

tobacco sales to minors (youth access) and environmental tobacco 

smoke in public places and workplaces. 

□ Referral to tobacco treatment services 

D Community Education and tobacco use prevention 

In 2000, 12 tobacco vendors were inspected for compliance with Town Regulations and 
State Law and were issued permits to sell tobacco. 

To monitor the sale of tobacco to minors the Tobacco Control Program conducted 
compliance checks of tobacco retailers in Medfield. During checks, several retailers 
sold tobacco to a minor, and those violators were notified accordingly. 

In June of 2000, the Tobacco Control Program conducted a survey of all workplaces in 
Medfield to assess their compliance with Board of Health regulations governing 
secondhand smoke in the workplace. The survey included questions about workplace 
smoking policy, if there were a procedure for reporting violations, and if "No Smoking" 
signs, a copy of the Board of Health Regulation, literature regarding the benefits of a 
smoke free workplace, assistance with developing a workplace policy, and sample 
policies. Results of the surveys returned indicated that most workplaces in Medfield are 
smoke free. 

The Tobacco Control Program is a member of the Medfield Public School's Health 
Advisory Committee and consults regularly with school personnel to promote smoke 
free school policies and plan substance abuse prevention events and programming. 

The Program's Tobacco Advisory Committee meetings are open to the public, and the 
public is invited to attend. For information regarding Tobacco Control Program services 
and activities or to file a complaint regarding secondhand smoke or the sale of tobacco to 
minors, please contact the Program Director at 781-449-2215. 

Medfield Youth Outreach 

The Medfield Youth Outreach Program is administered by the Board of Health and 
advised by the Outreach Advisory Committee. The town's Youth Outreach Worker 



78 



provides free and confidential individual and family counseling, information and 
referral, crisis intervention, community programming, and assistance with access to 
financial assistance programs to residents of Medfield. 

The Youth Outreach Office is located on the 2 nd floor of the Town Hall. Appointments 
can be made by calling Dawn Alcott, LICSW at 359-7121 . 

Counseling Services - The Outreach office received 101 referrals in 2000. Referral 
sources included the schools, law enforcement, a family member or friend, self referrals, 
and outside agencies. Of these referrals, several individuals and families received 
counseling services directly from the Youth Outreach Worker; others were referred to 
outside agencies or declined service. The issues of those receiving counseling services 
included the following: 



Academic Difficulties 

Anger Management 

Anxiety 

Bereavement 

Body Image/Eating Disorder 

Child Abuse/Neglect 

Dating Violence 

Depression 



Divorce 

Domestic Violence 
Family Discord 
Financial Difficulties 
Major Mental Illness 
Oppositional Behavior 
Parenting Skills 
Run Away 



Self Esteem 
Self Mutilation 
Sexual Assault 
Sexuality 
Social Skills 
Substance Abuse 



Community Programs -The Outreach Office also facilitates various groups, programs, 
and services with in the community that are related to the needs of youth and their 
families. This year approximately 220 individuals have participated in the following 
programs facilitated by Youth Outreach. 

Peer Leadership - A high school organization that is involved with mentoring and 
community service. 

Create TV - A weekly socialization group for middle school aged girls that culminates in 
the creation of their own television show on local cable access. The group 
enjoyed the assistance of Mike Sweeney, Cable 8 coordinator; Mary Day, 
community volunteer; and Sarah Meaney, student volunteer 

Summer Girls - A bi-weekly socialization group for middle school girls that grew out of 
Create TV that provided summer activity opportunities. The group 
enjoyed the volunteer efforts of Julia Kerr, Mary Kay consultant who 
provided skin care consultation; Laverne Lovell of Lovell's Flower and 
Nursery who provided instruction on floral arranging; and the support of 
Danielle Gill, student volunteer. 



79 



Medfield Youth Network - An expanding group of local youth service providers from 

schools, houses of worship, community agencies, municipal 
and state agencies, law enforcement, and health care who 
meet to collaborate and network to best meet Medfield youth 
needs. 

Financial Assistance - Intake site for all Medfield residents for state Fuel Assistance 
program. Coordinator of the Angel Tree program facilitated by 
Ben Franklin Savings Bank where by bank patrons provide 
holiday gifts to Medfield children in need. 



In addition, the Youth Outreach Worker collaborates as needed with a wide network of 
organizations to better meet the needs of Medfield youth and their families, including: 

The Association of Municipal Administrators of Youth and Family Services 

The Medfield Public Schools 

The Medfield Clergy 

The Medfield Home Committee 

The Charles River Community Partnership for Children 

The Medfield Public Schools Health Advisory Committee 

The Massachusetts Department of Mental Health 

The Massachusetts Department of Social Services 

The Domestic Violence Roundtable 

Riverside Community Care 24-Hour Crisis Intervention Service 

SANITATION 

Enviro-Tech Consultants conducted consulting services for enforcement of regulations 
related to food establishments, massage therapy, swimming facilities and general 
sanitation issues. 

The services and consultation to the Board of Health included attending Board of Health 
meetings, inspections of food establishments and school cafeterias, consultation and 
field services with the Tobacco Control Agent, consultation with the Environmental 
Agent and State agencies. Also inspections and reviews were conducted on a semi- 
public pool and the Hinkley Swim Pond recreational facility, which included review of 
biological reports and support services to the Park & Recreation Department staff. 

The review of changes to existing or new food facilities with consultation to the food 
operators was completed for several owners. Food and tobacco complaints were 
reviewed and resolved. The new State Food Codes were implemented in 2000. Food 
establishments were reviewed for changes in the State Food Codes including on-site 
training of personnel. Also, new State regulations relating to camps created the need for 
Board of health involvement, which included inspections and review of sports and 
general recreational camps 



80 



2000 Permits Issued: 

Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food service 

vending machines, and churches 
Food stores and markets 
Temporary Food service permits 
Bakeries 

Tanning Facilities 
Massage Therapy (establishments) 
Massage Therapy (individual) 
Semi-Public Pool 
Catering Services 
Ice Cream Truck 
Frozen Dessert 
Camps 
Bathing Beach 



31 

8 
19 

4 
1 
4 
7 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 



Inspections and Investigations 

Food Establishment inspections 64 

Beach and pool inspections 1 1 

Consultation Units - Investigations & Discussions >150 

Food Establishment Plan Review 4 

(includes Baskets & Beyond, North Street Market, 
Cumberland Farms, and Boka). 

The Board of Health normally holds its meetings on the second Wednesday evening of 
each month at 6:30 PM. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are invited 
to attend. Anyone interested in becoming a Board of Health member may call the Board 
of Health office or attend one of the regular meetings for information. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Heidi Groff, RNC, MPH, Chair 
Edith Herbeck, RN, MS 
Catherine Steever, ME, BS 
Fred Clarridge, M Ed., Associate 



81 



MEDFIELD HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 



The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 2000. 

The Medfield Housing Authority is authorized by and operates under the provisions of 
Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws. It is entirely funded through the 
Division of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) and is responsible to 
DHCD for the management of elderly housing. 

For information and/or application for housing at Tilden Village, please contact Donna 
Dolan, the Executive Director, at 359-6454. 

The Medfield Housing Authority has regular Board Meetings on the second Monday of 
each month at 7:30 P.M. in the office of the Executive Director at Tilden Village, 30 
Pound Street. The public is welcome to attend these meetings. 

Mary T. Rogers was elected to serve a five-year term on the Medfield Housing Authority 
Board at the March 2000 Town Election. H. Tracey Mitchell was appointed to serve on 
the Board until the next Town Election in March 2001; Mr. Mitchell is filling a vacancy 
on the Board. 

Again, we were very fortunate to have the Blake Middle School eighth grade class host a 
most enjoyable holiday dinner for all residents. The Medfield High School and Mr. 
DeSorgher's Political Science class put up the holiday decorations. 

During the holiday season Brownie, Girl Scout troops, and CCD groups provided us 
with caroling. 

A confirmation class from St. Edward hosted a lovely Pahn Sunday Brunch, which was 
very well attended. 

The Beacon Project has been coming to Tilden every two weeks and they have a 
tremendous following. They are a wonderful group of fifth grade students from Dale 
Street School who share their interests, entertain us, and have craft demonstrations. They 
decorated our courtyard for Halloween and graciously provided an early Thanksgiving 
dinner. Everyone who has attended these gatherings has thoroughly enjoyed them and 



82 



looks forward to their next visit. Our Beacon Buddies also celebrate the birthday of any 
resident whose birthday is that month. The interaction between the students and the 
residents is rewarding for everyone involved. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Richard D. Jordan, Chairman 

James T. Regan, Treasurer 

Valerie Mariani, Commissioner and State Appointee 

H. Tracy Mitchell, Commissioner 

Mary T. Rogers, Commissioner 




Grand Opening of the 1651 Shoppe at the Dwight Derby House 



83 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging has had another very busy and successful year. The 
Council consists of 5 community members. We continue to provide services to 1500+ 
individuals over age 60. The Council staff consists of 3 pan time employees: JoAnn 
Kunz, Director; Patricia Hand, Outreach Worker; and Joanne Murray, mini-bus driver. 
The Council also employs a part time Volunteer Coordinator, Pat Maloney. She is paid 
out of a Formula Grant through the Executive Office of Elder Affairs. The Medfield 
Council on Aging is represented on the Board of Directors of Health and Social Services 
Consortium, Inc. (HESSCO) by Vicki Hunt, on the Advisory Board of HESSCO by 
Barbara Connors, and on the Nutrition Council Board by Mildred Procop. The Council 
on Aging holds monthly meetings on the first Wednesday of each month at 2:00. The 
Council on Aging Board received Board member training from Emmett Schmarsow of 
Executive Office of Elder Affairs in May. 

A Volunteer Coordinator, Pat Maloney, recruits and trains volunteers to provide services to 
seniors. 300 ride requests were filled over the past year. A Volunteer Appreciation Coffee 
was held in May for 25+ volunteers who give of their time to the seniors of Medfield. Pat 
also recruits volunteers for any other needs such as friendly visitors or activity leaders. 
Volunteers for the Council on Aging have served in a wide variety of capacities. 

The Outreach Worker, Patricia Hand, works for the Council 10 hours per week. She began 
working in March. She has visited over 120 seniors to offer assistance and information. She 
also interacted and communicated with many other agencies. Twelve seniors and their 
families received crisis intervention services this year. Several trips were made to long term 
care facilities and adult day care programs with seniors and their family members. Thirty-six 
individuals received assistance in filling out "The Ride" application. Patricia obtained 
private companion help for several families as well as arranging for meals on wheels for 
homebound elders. She made over 1000 calls to seniors for follow-up and telephone 
reassurance. Sixty referrals were made to HESSCO. 

Our monthly health clinics continue at the Pfaff Center with a blood pressure and health 
screening by the Natick Visiting Nurse Association, a free hearing testing, and a podiatrist 
who charges $10 per person. The numbers of seniors attending these clinics is ever 
increasing. 

The TRIAD program was endorsed by the seniors of Medfield in May. This program is a 3- 
way partnership between elders, the police department, and the Norfolk County Sheriffs 
office. A $1000 check was received to provide for the running of this program. This group 
had a booth at Medfield Day to advertise the program. The TRIAD group meets on the 4 th 
Wednesday of every month at 2:00. 

A daily hot lunch program, run by HESSCO elder services, provides meals on wheels to 
those at home who need meals (over 1400 meals were delivered this past year) as well as a 



84 



nutritious hot lunch to 12-20 individuals Monday through Friday at the Pfaff Center. A 
small group of dedicated volunteers deliver over 7 meals daily during the week to 
homebound elders. About 3600 meals were served at the lunch site. The Council on Aging 
works very closely with HESSCO in referring many senior citizens and their families to this 
agency for services. HESSCO is now the Aging Services Access Point (ASAP) for a 12 
town area including Medfield. They provide a wide array of services to seniors in the area. 

Activities for seniors at the Pfaff Center include an art class, 2 exercise classes, three 
computer classes, a walking group, craft activities, a knitting group, a quilting class and a 
wood carving class. Monthly informational talks for seniors have included topics on fall 
prevention, Medicare information, emergency services, Medicare advocacy, property tax 
concerns and information and two different home care agencies. We also hosted an 
intergenerational program with the Dale Street School, a musical afternoon with Nils Ludin, 
and a spring fling luncheon. The Seniors Room has 3 computers as well as Internet access. 
These computers were purchased with help from the Medfield Fitness Association and 
FOSI. These computer classes are taught by 3 skilled volunteers who provide a wealth of 
information to seniors on computer use. There is also a wide variety of informational 
brochures available in the Seniors Room in a display case purchased by FOSI (Friends of 
Seniors Inc.). 

The Bus For Us continues to provide in-town transportation and mall trips Monday through 
Friday from 9-1 as well as two days per week in the afternoons. Over 2,332 individual trips 
were made last year by the Bus For Us. In town trips include rides to the polls and to senior 
functions as well as transportation provided to the Thomas Upham House nursing home. The 
driver, Joanne Murray, follows a set schedule so as to insure serving the greatest number of 
seniors possible. 

The monthly HOPE newsletter is mailed to all seniors, age 60+, in Medfield and to many out 
of town seniors and senior organizations. Over 1000 newsletters are mailed monthly. 

In July the Tax Work Off Progam began a fifth year of service to seniors. Seniors assist in 
several town departments including the Building Department, Council on Aging, Park and 
Recreation, the Town Clerk's Office, the Town Accountant's office, Highway garage, Board 
of Health, and all the town schools. These seniors complete projects and then receive 
compensation to be used to help offset their property taxes. The Council on Aging is 
pleased to have continued this new and mutually beneficial program. New guidelines for 
this program were established in April following adoption of new State legislation at the 
annual Town Meeting. 

The Babysitting Connection, where interested seniors are referred to young families in need 
of childcare, receives approximately 2-3 calls monthly from families. We also provide an 
informal medical equipment-borrowing program from donations of used equipment to the 
Council. 

SHINE (Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders) is available by calling the COA office 
for any senior with health insurance questions. Our SHINE volunteer, Ann McDonald 
moved away in May after providing many hours of service to the seniors of Medfield. 



85 



1 he Friends of Seniors, Inc. (FOSI), raises money through donations for a variety of projects 
and sen ices to benefit Medfield seniors. FOSI has helped with mailing of the HOPE 
newsletter, provided entertainment at Lions Club functions, provided beverages at the meal 
site, helped decorate the meal site, helped offset the cost of day trips for seniors and with 
emergency needs o\~ seniors. FOSI also helps to pay for the exercise classes at the Pfaff 
center. The President of FOSI, Gerry Doucette, passed away in April and this loss is felt in 
man) ways. Bill Mann has stepped forward to fill the post of President. 

The Medfield Lions Club and the American Legion hosted a lovely dinner in August for 100 
seniors. These two organizations along with MEMO, the Sportsmen's Club, the Legion 
auxiliary, and FOSI, hosted a Christmas dinner at the Legion Hall with over 200 seniors 
enjoying a meal and entertainment. 

One volunteer gave of his time and expertise in February through April to help fellow 
seniors with preparation of their federal and state tax forms. He provided over 50 sessions to 
individuals. Forty tax returns were prepared. 

The Garden Club and several Brownie and Girl Scout troops as well as a Boy Scout troop 
donated decorations and favors to the seniors at holiday times. These favors are distributed 
to "meals on wheels" recipients and guests at the daily lunch site. The Council continues to 
have much needed and tireless help from a wonderful volunteer who coordinates others to 
shovel out walkways for seniors who are unable to do this. This year a group of students at 
Dale Street school and their families have volunteered to help with the ever-growing needs 
of seniors in town. The Dale Street school volunteers also deliver library books and tapes to 
homebound seniors. They have also done other community service projects. The Middle 
School students continue their outreach to residents at the Thomas Upham House. 

The Council on Aging received a formula grant in the amount of $6435 from the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs. This funding will be used to help pay for the monthly HOPE 
newsletter mailing and a Volunteer Coordinator. The Medfield Women's Association gave 
the Council on Aging a generous donation to help fund 12 weeks of exercise classes for the 
seniors and craft supplies. 

Information on Council on Aging activities is covered on a regular basis on Cable 8, as well 
as in the Medfield Press, the Hometown weekly, as well as in the HOPE newsletter. The 
Director also communicates regularly with the Medfield Home Committee, the Youth 
Outreach Worker, the Medfield Housing Authority, the Medfield Interfaith Council and 
several schools. The Director meets regularly with all COA Directors in the HESSCO area, 
the Mass. Association of COA Directors, and other local Council Directors. 

The Mature Mods luncheons continue monthly at the United Church of Christ. These 
potluck lunches are open to any and all seniors. Speakers, entertainment and fellowship are 
included. 

Transportation is a need for many seniors in Medfield. The MBTA para-transit service, The 
Ride, continues to serve many in town. The Council on Aging office has directed many 
seniors to this service. Medical transportation is also provided by a small group of volunteers 
by calling the COA office. 



86 



The Council on Aging wishes to thank all the dedicated volunteers who provide many hours 
of service to the seniors in Medfield through meals on wheels delivery, friendly visiting, tax 
preparation help, snow shoveling, medical appointment driving, HOPE newsletter collation, 
help with holiday and special event parties, and innumerable other ways. We are very 
fortunate to have many new volunteers coming forward to offer their talents to the senior 
citizens of Medfield. 

We would also like to thank all the civic groups and town departments for their 
cooperation and support in helping us to serve Medfield's senior population. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Jo Ann Kunz, Director 
Werner Kiessling, Chairman 
Carl Brewer, 1 st Vice Chairman 
Fred Snow, 2nd Vice Chairman 
Peg Jenkins, Treasurer 
Dot Whyte, member 






***, . fv 




Pre- Ballet at the Pfaff Center 



87 



NORFOLK COUNTY GOVERNMENT 



To the Citizens of Norfolk County: 

We wish to thank you and our municipal officials for allowing us to provide county 
services to our twenty-eight communities. Thanks also to the advisory board, county 
officials, department heads and employees for their continuing support, assistance, and 
cooperation. Through the continued efforts of all involved in Norfolk County 
government, we continue to be a useful and financially healthy entity. 

During fiscal year 2000, in addition to traditional regional services monies spent to fund 
the Norfolk County R&SVP Program, Domestic Violence Ended and local food pantries, 
we funded new services including: 

• Summer Youth Program for Dedham to provide employment opportunities to 
young people ages 14-20 

• Program to increase tourism and attract new business 

• Traffic study projects on Route 138 corridor and Sharon commuter rail 

The County continued to support its version of legislation to promote funding for Open 
Space and Recreation purposes, for the benefit of its municipalities. Another 
successfully Annual Norfolk County Legislative Breakfast was held at the Norfolk 
County Agricultural School in Walpole. We hosted a special luncheon in honor of our 
R&SVP volunteers who served at the former Massachusetts Respiratory Hospital, in 
addition to the annual volunteer recognition banquet. A federal grant in excess of 
$198,000 was awarded to us by the U.S. Department of Justice. Proceeds from the grant 
allowed us to purchase critical communications equipment for use by local police, fire 
and emergency service units, allowing them to communicate on the same frequency, in 
the event of a terrorist incident. 

The Norfolk County Agricultural High School in Walpole, continues to provide high 
quality, technical programs in horticulture, arboricultural, natural resources, pet store 
operations, dog grooming, diesel and gasoline equipment maintenance and repair, and 
construction of basic farm structures. The school has done much to prepare for the high 
standards of MCAS: Norfolk County Aggie students' test scores were highest in the 
state, for a vocational school. 

The Registry of Deeds provides state-of-the-art services to the public. Hundreds of 
people visited the Registry each week to conduct their business. Documents recorded in 
the Registry and Land Court totaled 172,745. 



. 



Wollaston Recreational Facility in North Quincy provides local golfers with an excelle 
course on which to play, at reasonable prices. Each year Presidents Golf Course presents 
the popular Norfolk County Classic Golf Tournament. Improvements to the course this 
year included a new well to improve irrigation. It will be ready to furnish water by 



88 



spring 2001. A new food service contract was awarded to Union Chowder House, well 
known in our area for its tasty cuisine. 

Services available from the County Engineering Department included highway layouts, 
topographic or existing condition surveys and plans, the staking and monumentation of 
County layouts, through the use of GPS, as well as preparation of street acceptance plans 
and performing traffic counts. Carlos A. Sanchez was appointed County Engineer, upon 
retirement of former County Engineer John M. Paronich. 

The Office of the Sheriff, under Sheriff Michael G. Bellotti, administered various 
programs, in accordance with their goals and objectives to provide continuing 
progressive leadership, including establishment of a Triad Program to help prevent, 
rather than react to crime. 

Our continuing goal is to develop and implement regional services that will enhance the 
quality of life for our citizens. 

Respectfully submitted, 



William P. O'Donnell, Chairman 

John M.Gillis 

Peter H. Collins 

NORFOLK COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 




A view of the 350 th Anniversary Gala 



89 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The operational program of the Project integrates all proven technologies into a system 
of mosquito control that is rational, environmentally sensitive and cost effective. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Water Management Projects 

Our primary efforts are concentrated on the management of shallow, standing, stagnant 
water, and the maintenance of existing flow systems which can contribute to mosquito 
breeding. 

Drainage ditches checked/cleaned 9,800 feet 

Brush obstructing drainage cut 1 ,520 feet 

Culverts checked/cleaned 90 culverts 

Water Management by wide-track backhoes 768 feet 

Larval Control 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the next most effective 
control effort. 

Larval control by backpack\briquets\mistblowers 101.59 acres 
Rain Basin treatments 1 , 1 24 basins 

Aerial Larval Control 256 acres 

Adult Control 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary when they are numerous, 
annoying, and/or threatening to residents. 

Adult control aerosol applications from trucks 992 acres 

Surveys, inspections, and pre/post monitoring in support of our program include locating 
and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and fieldwork evaluations 
leading to better water management. 

NCMCP received 56 calls from residents for information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 



John J. Smith 
Superintendent 



90 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



This report is for the calendar year ending December 3 1 , 2000. 

The 350 th Anniversary Tree Committee donated and planted 190 trees this year. The 
Chairman of this committee is Mark Wilson. A special thank you for the contributions 
from the following: Lueder Tree, Shady Tree, Lovells, Robert Santucci, Mike 
Thompson, B&B Landscaping, Richard and RobinWyman. I would like to thank all the 
volunteers and various Town Departments for all their help. 

Without major storms to cause extensive tree damage, only routine maintenance was 
required this year. Throughout the town, we are still loosing many ash trees due to the 
disease Ash Yellow. We continuously survey, recognize and remedy potential hazardous 
trees and tree conditions before serious problems occur. 

McMillan Professional Tree Service received the town contract for tree trimming and 
removal. Many streets were targeted for typical tree pruning and removal. 

The Tree Department received a new chipper at this year's town meeting. We hope to 
obtain funding for a replacement truck since it is over 22 years old. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their j>roperty, 
prior notice must be sent to the Town Clerk, by registered mail no later than March 1 of 
that year. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

Tree Warden 

Director of Insect Pest Control 



91 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



\o the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Parks and Recreation Commission is a five member, elected board o* 
volunteers. The Commission is charged with the responsibility of monitoring the 
operations of the Parks and Recreation Department including seven public properties - 
Pfaff Community Center, Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park, "Grind Stone" Skate Park. 
Baxter Park, Baker's Pond and McCarthy Park. In addition, the department supervises a 
grounds maintenance contract covering the previously mentioned parks plus the Town 
Hall, Library, Historical Society, Police and Fire Stations. 

The Commission's responsibilities include: recruiting qualified personnel; creating 
policies; generating diversified recreational and educational opportunities; monitoring 
the maintenance schedule for the above properties; and advising the Director to achieve 
the goals set forth in the Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan. The department 
consists of a full time Director, a part time Program Coordinator and a part-time office 
assistant. Additional personnel are recruited to teach classes and organize summa 
programs. Responsibilities of the department include: creating, implementing, 
evaluating and adjusting year round leisure experiences; establishing fiscal and 
personnel plans to complete the objectives for each program; monitoring public property 
usage; and implementing a maintenance schedule for many Town properties. 

The Parks and Recreation Commission is dedicated to providing quality programs that 
can enhance the quality of life for Medfield residents. Participation units in Parks and 
Recreation Programs are as follows: 





Participants 




Participants 


Youth programs 


1,575 


Summer Discovery Program 


180 


Youth Sports 


800 


Jr. Tennis Program 


410 


Adult Activities/Fitness 


575 


Swim Pond Memberships 


225 


Special Events 


5,000 


Swim Team 


47 


Day Trips 


900 


Swim Lessons 


475 



Capital improvements and maintenance continues to be a priority. The Commission 
supports a centralized scheduling and maintenance system for public properties. It is the 
Commissions intent to assist in simplifying the process for reserving field space and 
ensure that routine maintenance is being performed. Capital improvement goals include 
Pfaff center upgrades, improving the quality of the swim pond and re-conditioning of 
our Medfield' s community park system. 



92 






We would also like to take this opportunity to thank the scores of residents who 
volunteer their time and energies in many of our recreation and sports programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jim Landry, Chairman 
Tom Caragliano, Secretary 
Toni Aaronson 
Nancy Jaques 
Scott McDermott 




Pumpkin Decorating at the Pfaff Center 



93 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 



The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is the regional planning agency 
representing 101 cities and towns in the metropolitan Boston area. Created by an act of 
the Legislature in 1963, it serves as a forum for state and local officials to address issues 
of regional importance. As one of 14 members of the Boston Metropolitan Planning 
Organization (MPO), MAPC has oversight responsibility for the region's federally 
funded transportation program. Council membership consists of community 
representatives, gubernatorial appointees and city and state agencies who collaborate in 
the development of comprehensive plans and recommendations in areas of population 
and employment, transportation, economic development, housing, regional growth and 
the environment. The 25 member elected Executive Committee meets 1 1 times a year. 
The full Council meets three times a year. Meetings are held at various localities 
throughout the region. 

MAPC works with its 101 cities and towns through eight subregional organizations. 
Each subregion has members appointed by the chief elected officials and planning 
boards of the member communities and is coordinated by an MAPC staff planner. The 
subregions meet on a regular basis to discuss and work on issues of local concern. 
Canton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Medfield, Milton, Needham, Norwood, Sharon, 
Stoughton, Walpole and Westwood are member communities of the Three Rivers 
Interlocal Council (TRIC) subregion. The community representatives of the TRIC 
subregion consist primarily of town planners, elected officials, and community 
representatives from the eleven neighboring towns. This year, TRIC 

• participated in the development of the new Regional Transportation Plan, the main 
document that will determine transportation investments and funding until 2025, by 
reviewing the region's existing conditions, policies, and growth management 
options; 

• discussed the implications of potential growth as shown by buildout analyses 
completed by MAPC; and 

• hosted a workshop on Conservation Subdivision Design, a model study completed 
by MAPC on an innovative land use technique to preserve land while 
accommodating development. 

Working with state legislators, MAPC defined the parameters of a statewide road and 
bridge construction program under Chapter 87 of the Acts of 2000. The legislation will 
help to secure a more stable funding source and insure an annual $400 million statewide 
road and bridge construction program. MAPC also played a key role in shaping and 
insuring the passage of legislation that reformed the funding of the Massachusetts Bay 



94 



Transportation Authority. Similar efforts this year led to the passage of the Community 
Preservation Act and reform of the Commonwealth's Zoning Enabling Act. 

MAPC is continuing its work with local communities on Buildout Analyses throughout 
the region. The Executive Office of Environmental Affairs has funded this two-year 
long effort and has contracted with MAPC to complete a buildout analysis for every city 
and town in the metropolitan region. The purpose of the study is to create an 
approximate "vision" in quantitative terms of the potential future growth permitted and 
encouraged by a community's bylaws. Thus far, ten out of the 12 TRIC communities 
have had their buildout analysis completed. All of the communities will have their 
buildout analysis completed and presented to their town by the end of June 2001. Once 
the buildout analyses have been presented to the local communities, the communities 
become eligible for funding for planning assistance under Executive Order 418. 

MAPC has also begun work with the Town of Milton to assist the community in 
examining alternatives for redevelopment of its commercial areas, and will work with 
the community to develop bylaws to enable the vision for the future which results from 
this project. The study is expected to be completed by summer 2001 . 




Pre-Kindergarten Soccer at the Pfaff Center Field 



95 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

In July 2000 the School Committee reorganized and re-elected the following officers: 
Robert J. Heavey (Medway), Chairman, Karl Lord (Medfield) Vice-Chairman, and 
Robert McLintock (Seekonk) Secretary. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the third 
Wednesday of each month at 7:30 P.M. in the Committee Meeting Room at the school. 
Sub-committee meetings are scheduled as needed. 

Graduation 

On June 4, 2000, 150 students were graduated in an impressive afternoon ceremony. 
Robert Heavey, Chairman of the Tri-County School Committee, delivered the 
welcoming address to more than one thousand guests. 

Music was provided by the King Philip High School Band. Camilla Huston, Director of 
Pupil Personnel Services, presented scholarships and awards totaling $200,000 to 
deserving seniors 

Pupil Personnel Services 

In September 1999, Tri-County welcomed approximately 837 students to the new school 
year. The district towns and number of students are Franklin 212, Medfield 8, Medway 
43, Millis 43, Norfolk 28, North Attleboro 192, Plainville 71, Seekonk 87, Sherborn 4, 
Walpole 54, and Wrentham 41. Also 54 students were accepted from out-of-district 
areas. 

During the 1999-00 school year the Pupil Personnel Department continued its programs 
to provide information to students, parents, sending schools and District communities. 
The Department provided counseling for students regarding career pathways and post- 
secondary education. The Peer Helpers assisted in introducing Tri-County to junior high 
school students in sending communities and assisted new students in adjusting to Tri- 
County. A growing and successful Peer Mediators program offered conflict resolution 
for students by students. Safe and Drug Free presentations were offered to students 
school wide. The Guidance Department presented programs on preparing for college 
with the assistance of personnel from Dean College. Tri-County hosted Career Days for 
over 2000 Grade 8 students from the Regional District. 

Tri-County's Career Advisement Program (CAP) was offered to all students in Grades 
9-12 to assist students in preparing for their career pathways. This was the 3 rd year the 
program was offered having started in September 1997 with Grades 9 and 10. The 
program was fully implemented in 1999-2000 and includes all students in Grades 9-12. 



96 



Academics 

For academic year 1999-2000, the goal of Tri-County's academic programs was to raise 
the achievement level of all students. To that end, energies were focused on classroom 
instruction; alignment of the special education and regular education curricula; and 
expansion of instructional technology in a meaningful way. 

During the summer, teachers reviewed curriculum for alignment with the Massachusetts 
Frameworks and the MCAS test. Changes were made to emphasize the content, 
strategies and types of questions used on the test. In the classroom, cooperative teams 
were developed that included a regular education and special education teacher. The 
purpose of these teams was to allow more students to transition from resource classes to 
regular classes. The experience was successful and will be expanded for the next 
academic year. To further raise achievement levels of special needs students, regular 
and special education teachers worked during the summer to align curricula and create 
appropriate modifications without diluting content. 

Technology integration continues. A computer lab was developed in the South Wing to 
expand existing availability in our library media center. Next year, a lab will be 
developed in the North Wing to further this expansion. Additionally, every teacher now 
has a computer and printer located in the classroom for professional and instructional 
use. The math department has purchased the Geometer Sketchpad computer program 
and 30 graphing calculators. The English department utilizes 40 licenses for the CCC 
Successmaker reading comprehension program. Next year, the Special Education staff 
will receive targeted professional development of this program in reading and math. 
Social Studies teachers have been provided technology stations with Internet access and 
include projection screens, a computer, a printer and an overhead projector. Professional 
development in its use is ongoing. 

Freshmen and sophomores now attend math classes every day of both academic and 
shop weeks. The intent of this change is to increase retention loss and reduce the need 
for time-consuming reviews. Another school-wide change is the implementation of a 
standard homework policy. All academic and related classes must count homework for 
25% of the grade. The intent of this change is to reduce the number of students who fail 
for not doing homework. Aligned with this effort is our very successful Homework 
Center where students who fail to do homework can be referred and appropriate controls 
are provided to see the homework gets done - most notably, prompt parental 
communication. 

In summary, Tri-County has focused energy on raising student expectations and 
providing the necessary support to enable students to meet these expectations. The 
process is ongoing. High Schools That Work continues to be the national model used to 
implement effective school change that results in higher academic achievement of all 
students. 



97 



Vocational Technical Programs 

AUTO BODY - The program has applied for A.S.E. certification and is preparing for the 
on-site visit by The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation. 

AUTO TECHNOLOGY - The Auto Technology program has received A.S.E. Master 
Certification from The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation. The 
AYES (Automotive Youth Educational System) program sponsored by GM, Diamler- 
Chrysler, Toyota, Mercedes Benz, Audi and Volkswagen has been introduced to our 
Auto Technology program; students explore job opportunities at local dealerships. A 
mentor is assigned to each student during a summer internship. 

CARPENTRY - OUTSIDE PROJECT -The work was completed on the World War I 
Memorial Park Administration Building Addition & Renovation Project on Elmwood 
Avenue in North Attleboro, which consisted of removing a flat roof and constructing a 
100' gable roof, constructing a 24 x 24 deck over new addition, constructing suspension 
ceilings throughout building, installing vinyl siding on the ends of structure, and painting 
the exterior of building. 

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY - The program offers the CISCO Networking Academy, 
provided by CISCO Systems, the worldwide leader in Internet technology. Students 
learn through an on-line curriculum and testing, as well as hands-on labs, and have the 
opportunity to become a CCNA (Cisco Certified Network Associate). 

COSMETOLOGY - Cosmetologists provide a variety of beauty services related to the 
care of the hair, scalp, skin and nails. Beginning students receive instruction in 
manicuring, shampooing, hair cutting, finger waving, pincurl sets and scalp treatment. 
Advanced students learn to give permanent waves and facial treatments and have the 
opportunity to straighten, bleach, and tint hair. The clinic is open to the public during the 
school year. 

CULINARY ARTS - The Culinary Program was awarded the ACF Certificate this year. 
The American Culinary Federation's validation provides students with many 
opportunities. Students who complete the program and pass the validated exam are 
given the title, "certified cook" through the ACF. Students are also eligible for 
scholarships offered through the ACF. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD CAREERS - The Early Childhood Careers program prepares 
high school students for various careers in working with young children. Through in- 
depth academic studies in child growth and development, students gain a solid 
understanding of the early childhood years and a working knowledge of children in this 
critical stage of development. Students work directly with pre-school aged children in 
the on-campus facility, thus acquiring skill and confidence in their teaching abilities. 

ELECTRICAL - OUTSIDE PROJECT - World War I Memorial Park - "Administration 
Building" in North Attleboro. Electrical wiring was completed which included, a new 
electrical service, all new inside & outside lighting, power outlets both inside & out, 



98 



emergency lights & signs. All the work was done in accordance with the State National 
Electric Code and was inspected and approved by the local electrical inspector. 



ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY - The Electronics Technology program teaches 
students electronic theory, design, construction and troubleshooting of electronic devices 
through a project-based curriculum. Classroom experience will consolidate basic 
AC/DC theory, solid-state technology, digital theory and electronic communication 
theory with related circuits. 



FACILITIES MANAGEMENT - This course of study involves eight areas of study: 
Carpentry, Plumbing, Electrical, Welding, Metal Fabrication, Painting, Landscaping, 
Estimating & Scheduling. 



DESIGN & PUBLISHING - Students learn basic and advanced drawing and design 
skills that include elements of design and composition, color theory, advanced 
illustration, photography, airbrush, cartooning, painting and advertising design. The 
software programs include: Quark, PageMaker, Freehand, Illustrator and Photo shop. 
Students also learn camera work, plate making & offset printing. The shop program has 
printed reports, forms and booklets for district police, fire, and school departments. 



HEATING, VENTILATING, AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION - 
Students are trained to install, repair, and maintain cooling, heating, air handling, 
humidification, filtering, and refrigeration equipment including motors and controls. 

MACHINE TECHNOLOGY - The Machine Shop program provides training in the setup 
and operation of general-purpose machine tools, as well as computerized equipment. 



MARKETING COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS - The major emphasis is in 
the areas of banking, office technology, retailing and computer applications. The bank 
branch of Dean Cooperative, and the computer laboratory provide opportunity for both 
customer service and the application of the theoretical knowledge learned in the 
classroom. 

MEDICAL CAREERS - Topics covered in this program include care of the child and 
adult as patients, vital signs, CPR, first aid, body systems, behavior, communication and 
nurse assistant skills. Students will receive a solid foundation in medical terminology 
and procedures if they choose to further their education in such areas as medical 
assistant, EMT, nurse, physical therapist, dental hygienist, and more. Clinical experience 
is provided at chronic care and local health care facilities. 



99 



PLUMBING & HYDRONIC HEATING - Graduates of this program may enter the 
workforce as apprentice plumbers. 

Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Program offers an Adult Cosmetology program during the day. 
The program runs from September to May and follows the high school calendar. 
Registration for this program takes place at the end of May each year. 

The Evening School Division enrolled approximately 500 students for the 1999-00 school 
year. Registration for the Evening Division takes place in September and January. New 
programs for the 1999-00 school year include; Surfing the Internet and Basic Home 
Repairs. 

Student Activities 

VICA, Vocational Industrials Clubs of America, is a national student organization 
serving trade, industrial, technical and health occupations students with leadership, 
citizenship and character development activities and programs. Members in high school 
trade preparatory and industrial cooperative programs have their own division and 
activities. Tri-County VICA during the 1999-2000 school year had 137 members in 
grades 10 through 12. Members fundraised some of the club's monies by holding the 
annual Breakfast with Santa and Breakfast with the Easter Bunny. In the springtime, 
seventy-two students attended the Central District competition. Twenty-one students 
qualified in their trade area to attend the state competition. At states, four students won 
the right to compete at the national level held in Kansas City, Missouri during the last 
week of June. Two competitors finished in 5 and 9 th place nationwide in their respective 
categories, while the other two students came in 1 1 th place. 

DECA is a national organization for high school students enrolled in marketing program. 
DECA operates in 50 states, 4 U.S. Territories, and Canada and prepares its members to 
be America's future leaders in the field of marketing, management and entrepreneurship. 
There are four main parts emphasized: leadership development, civic consciousness, 
social intelligence and vocational understanding. Students must compete in both written 
and oral competitions at the district, state and national levels. Teachers work throughout 
the year within the classroom preparing students for competitions. Students who place 
at districts then travel to states and if successful they're on to nationals. 

The National Honor Society, with thirteen members in grades eleven and twelve, 
organizes events promoting scholarship, leadership, and service. This group sponsored 
the annual holiday food drive, which benefited the Franklin Food Pantry and the 
Woonsocket Soup Kitchen. Other projects included collecting money for Easter Seals at 
the basketball tournament in February, participating in Pennies for Patients in the spring, 
and sponsoring a Red Cross Blood Drive in May. The Chapter again hosted a 
Leadership Breakfast for all students in leadership position. NHS hosts Honors Night 
ceremonies, assuming all organization, preparatory, and emceeing duties. 

Athletics 



100 



The 1999-2000 athletic year was very successful for the Tri-County Cougars, success 
being measured in records, participation and, most importantly, sportsmanship. The year 
started off with former New England Patriots Ron Burton speaking to the fall athletes 
and their parents on the importance of good health and wellness. 

The third year Golf Team took home the Mayflower League title playing their home 
matches at New England Country Club. The boys' and girls' Cross Country teams ran 
well and the Volleyball team had 30 girls competing on two teams. The Soccer team 
finished in second place and advances to the state playoffs. The Football team 
completed their fourth year at Camp Mi-Te-Na. The hard work paid off with a strong 
record. Meanwhile the cheerleaders continued their winning ways cheering on all teams. 

The gym was busy during the winter season as five teams played Basketball. The Girls 
Varsity, Junior Varsity along with the Boys Varsity, Junior Varsity and Freshman teams 
had successful seasons. The Wrestling team had several athletes compete in the State 
and Vocational tournaments. The Cheerleaders competed in team competitions as well 
as cheering on the Boys Basketball team. 

The spring season saw a new team added to our school. A Junior Varsity Lacrosse 
program had 30 students participating. The first year program finished with an 
impressive 8 and 8 record. The Softball team had one of its best seasons competing in 
both the State and Vocational tournaments. The Baseball team did something no other 
Tri-County baseball team has done by making it to the State South Sectional Semi 
Finals. 

The Tri-County Boosters again awarded $1,200 in scholarships to graduating seniors. 
The group had a great fundraising year and continued to provide financial support to the 
athletes of Tri-County. 

Summary 

As we continue to provide for the educational needs of our students, we wish to thank 
District residents for their support and cooperation. We intend to maintain in the future 
the high educational standard that has earned Tri-County that support in the past. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



Robert J. Heavey, Chairman, Medway 
Karl Lord, Medfield 



101 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



DECEMBER 31, 2000 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the School Committee, I would like to thank our talented and dedicated staff 
of administrators, teachers and support personnel whose joint efforts continue to ensure 
that the Medfield Public School system is one of the best in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Based on their MCAS test results, as well as academic and 
extracurricular achievements, our students have maintained their excellent standard of 
performance this year. As a result, our community continues to attract new families to 
Medfield, thereby increasing the student population. Ten years ago, our student 
population was 1,777. This year, we added 107 additional students to our enrollment and 
our October 1, 2000 enrollment figure was 2,843. 

The 2000 calendar year was extremely busy for our committee on numerous fronts. 
Considerable progress was made towards final recommendations and approval of a 
school building and renovation project. New policies were adopted by the School 
Committee regarding class size and home school eligibility. The School Committee also 
initiated an active role in the Massachusetts Association of School Committees in 
proposing and debating resolutions and amendments regarding the current MCAS testing 
requirements. 

Following the appointment of the permanent School Planning and Building Committee 
(Timothy Bonfatti, Susan Cotter, Keith Mozer, Richard McCullough, David Binder and 
Superintendent Maguire) in November 1999, members of the School Committee met on a 
regular basis with the Building Committee to propose and revise the recommended 
renovation and building expansion program. The Building Committee initially studied 
the recommendations of the Feasibility Committee (Clark Holland, Robert Zabe, James 
O'Neil, Steve Kramer, Susan Cotter, Larry Colvin, Patricia Connelly, Connie Jones, 
Carolyn Casey, Superintendents Martes and Maguire, and Director of Finance and 
Operations Joseph Cuccinotta). The role of the Building Committee was to determine the 
most cost-effective means of addressing the emergency needs that had been identified by 
the Feasibility Committee: 

1 . The need to increase high school space 

2. The need to substantially renovate and/or replace the Memorial School 

3. The need to substantially renovate and expand the Blake Middle School 

During calendar year 2000, there were substantial meetings, public hearings and public 
debate over numerous recommended proposals to accommodate the expanding student 
population and the deteriorated school buildings. In late spring, the Design Partnership 
of Cambridge was selected to serve as architect on the building project and work with the 
Planning and Building Committee in presenting the school renovation and building 
proposal. 



103 



In connection with our Committee's joint efforts with the Planning and Building 
Committee on the school building project, the School Committee worked extensively 
with our state elected officials to insure that the 63% reimbursement rate for the project 
would be maintained for Medfield. Initially, the eligibility for the 63% was scheduled to 
expire if the project was not approved by June 30, 2000. However, based on 
considerable effort by committee members in working with Senator JoAnne Sprague, the 
"grandfather" language was drafted and inserted into the Senate budget and was 
ultimately approved in the state budget which enabled Medfield to retain its 63% 
reimbursement rate if the project is approved by June 30, 2001. 

Following review of numerous proposals and concepts, the Building and School 
Committees recommended a $57.4 million project which would include a new 
elementary school PreK-1 facility at the Wheelock site, renovation and expansion of the 
existing Blake Middle School into a new High School, and construction of a small 
addition to the existing Kingsbury High School building which would become the Middle 
School. On November 17, 2000, the proposal was passed at Town Meeting but was 
narrowly defeated in a ballot question election on December 5 th . The Building and 
School Committees then agreed to propose a reduced program to be presented at a 
subsequent Town Meeting in early January 2001 for approval by the community. 

The School Committee is grateful for the extraordinary commitment of Superintendent 
Maguire and the Planning and Building Committee for their tireless efforts in attending 
meetings to prepare and revise the project proposals. Their dedicated work on both the 
initial and revised plan will hopefully result in an approved project for the year 2001 . 

In January 2000, the School Committee adopted a new "home school" policy to 
accommodate Medfield families who have elected to educate their children at home, yet 
would like the students to either take courses and/or participate in extracurricular 
activities at the Medfield Public Schools. The School Committee adopted a policy which 
would allow home school students to take a limited number of course offerings at 
Medfield Public Schools on the same terms and conditions as regular students and 
adopted similar requirements for participation in extracurricular activities. 

After a public hearing, extensive debate and numerous cooperative meetings with 
members of the Warrant Committee, the School Committee approved a 9.5% increase in 
the school budget for fiscal year 2000-2001. This avoided the necessity of an operational 
override for fiscal year 2000-2001. 

In February, State Representative Lida Harkins attended a School Committee meeting to 
discuss community concerns with inadequate levels of funding for Medfield Public 
Schools. Since the implementation of the funding formula under the Education Reform 
Act of 1993, suburban communities have experienced considerable growth in student 
population but have not received proportionate increases in state funding. At the 



104 



meeting, the committee and town officials urged Representative Harkins to encourage 
state leaders to acknowledge existing inequities in the funding formula and assist 
Medfield and other growing communities with budgetary issues. 

Representatives from the Department of Education conducted an audit of the Medfield 
Public Schools facilities in late 1999 based on requirements of the Education Reform Act 
of 1993. Medfield Public Schools received an excellent review by the state 
representatives in their report issued in spring 2000. However, it was noted that our 
facilities are substantially overcrowded at this time and the Memorial School was cited 
for lack of special educational instructional space. These and other areas of concern are 
being addressed in the renovation and building proposals by the Building Committee. 

In April 2000, Ann Ashworth, the Principal of Chatham High School, accepted an offer 
to become the new principal of Medfield High School for year 2000-2001. Since Ann 
joined the school system, our committee has enjoyed working with her and she has made 
a valuable contribution to the excellent administrative staff in the Medfield Public School 
system. 

In September 2000, the School Committee adopted a class size guideline policy 
concerning the recommended number of students in classes in grades K-12. In the 
policy, the Committee recommends the following class size guidelines: 



K-l 


20 


2-4 


23 


5 


24 


Middle School 6-8 


24 


High School 9-12 


24 



The policy emphasizes that uniformity is not the goal and these recommended class sizes 
should be guidelines subject to operational budgetary restrictions and individual class 
circumstances. 

Due to the expanded student population in the Dale Street school, a modular facility was 
added to the Dale Street building. The modular facility, funded by the Town capital 
budget, provides necessary additional classroom space and is a physically attractive 
addition to the existing Dale Street building. 

In September 2000, the School Committee completed its evaluation of Superintendent 
Maguire's first year as Superintendent of Medfield Public Schools. The Committee 
unanimously agreed that Superintendent Maguire has done an outstanding job during his 
first year in budgeting, system assessment, curriculum development and policy 
implementation. In addition, he has devoted an extraordinary amount of time to the 
building and renovation project and demonstrated a high level of care and concern for 



05 



staff and students. We are all extremely grateful for the commitment and dedicated work 
Bob has provided as Superintendent of Medfield Public Schools during his first year. 

In the fall 2000, the School Committee took an active role in MASC, the Massachusetts 
Association of School Committees, and Steve Kramer attended the annual conference in 
Worcester. At the conference, resolutions were presented to suspend or eliminate the 
MCAS tests as a graduation requirement for the Class of 2003. Our Committee initially 
recommended approval of a resolution to suspend the requirement. However, Chairman 
Kramer subsequently drafted an amendment that the Committee unanimously agreed to 
present at the conference which would recommend that state officials study all aspects of 
the test and make appropriate revisions to the current requirements prior to making it a 
graduation requirement in 2003. The amendment proposed that the status of the MCAS 
test be reviewed in one year rather than eliminate passage as a graduation requirement at 
this time. Although the amendment was defeated at the School Committee conference, 
many School Committee representatives and administrative officials at the conference 
agreed that a compromise on test requirements would be needed. 

Commencing in early Spring 2000, Steve Kramer, Bill Tosches, Superintendent Maguire 
and Joe Cuccinotta began negotiations with the Teachers' Association for a new contract. 
The negotiations continued throughout the spring, summer and fall, resulting in 13 
negotiation meetings and two state mediation sessions. Following the second mediation 
meeting, the Committee agreed to a new three-year contract with the Teachers' 
Association in November 2000. Throughout the negotiations, the Committee attempted 
to significantly reduce the appreciable difference between the level of salaries received 
by Medfield public school teachers and those in surrounding communities. Based on the 
terms of the contract, we were able to substantially reduce the salary gap while 
maintaining a fiscally responsible operating budget for the school system. 

Finally, based on MCAS test scores that were released in the fall of 2000, Medfield 
remains one of the top performing school systems in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. These results are a tribute to both the teachers and staff in the Medfield 
Public Schools as well as the dedicated parents in our community. 

Over the course of the year 2000, students at all levels of Medfield Public Schools 
participated in numerous volunteer and charitable efforts in Medfield and surrounding 
communities. Both the students and the staff of the Medfield Public Schools who have 
participated in these programs should be complimented for their willingness to help 
others in need or who are less fortunate. 

Based on the extremely successful athletic seasons for many Medfield boys and girls 
school athletic teams, the Boston Globe awarded the Medfield Public Schools the 
prestigious Dalton Award in November 2000. There were also many other noteworthy 
achievements by students in the arts, music and other areas of academic achievement. 
The School Committee was assisted at our meetings by high school student 



106 



representatives, Dominique Semeraro, who graduated in June 2000 and John Palombo, 
who joined us in September 2000. 

A primary reason for the success of our students is the tremendous support and input 
from the people of Medfield. On an annual basis, many volunteers work in each school, 
serve on various committees and help provide our students with additional financial 
resources and support to obtain a high quality education. 

Over the next year, many challenges will need to be addressed, including resolution of 
issues related to the building project. We will continue to encourage our state 
representatives to increase the level of state funding for the budgetary needs for the 
Medfield School system and urge all town members to stay informed and participate in 
the process. 

In closing, I would like to thank my fellow members of the School Committee for their 
extraordinary commitment to our efforts this year. Susan Cotter, Bill Tosches, Jim Caine 
and Carolyn Casey have all worked tirelessly on the programs mentioned in this report to 
ensure that we provide the best policies and support for the Medfield Public School 
system. The year 2000 brought us many challenges and we are grateful for the 
tremendous commitment by Superintendent Maguire and the entire staff of the Medfield 
Schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Steven E. Kramer, Chairman 
Medfield School Committee 




107 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Enrollment Figures 
As of October 1,2000 



Memorial School 

Kindergarten: 
Grade 1: 


235 
232 


Ralph Wheelock School 
Grade 2: 
Grade 3 : 


257 
228 


Dale Street School 
Grade 4: 
Grade 5 : 


248 
258 


Thomas A. Blake Middle School 
Grade 6: 
Grade 7: 
Grade 8: 


265 

205 
249 


Amos Clark Kingsbury High Schoo 
Grade 9: 
Grade 10: 
Grade 11: 
Grade 12: 


190 
156 
178 
142 



TOTAL: 2843 



108 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I am pleased to submit this report regarding the Medfield Public Schools for the year 
2000. 

The school budget for FY2001 totaled $15,957,119. This figure represents a 9.45% 
increase over the town's appropriation for FY2000. Once again this year, the increases in 
the school budget are a direct reflection of the dramatic increases we are experiencing in 
student population growth. The October 1, 2000 enrollment for the school system was 
2843 students. This figure is an increase of 106 students from the prior year enrollment. 
Historically, this is the highest population of students that have been enrolled in the 
Medfield Public Schools. 

The large increase in student population has continued to stress the space availability in 
our schools. During the spring the Permanent School Planning and Building Committee 
(SPBC) met on a weekly basis to develop a plan to resolve the space and facility issues of 
our educational buildings. The SPBC hired The Design Partnership of Cambridge as the 
architectural firm to complete the preliminary schematic drawings and study required by 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to obtain grant funding for school construction. 
During the summer the state legislature began debate to overhaul the laws related to 
school construction and funding. The SPBC worked closely with the School Committee, 
the Selectmen and other local officials to ensure that the Town of Medfield had 
"grandfathering" language added to proposed legislation that was being implemented to 
maintain the level of state funding for Medfield. During the fall, the SPBC held 
numerous meetings and public hearings to present the plan that had been developed to the 
community. Subsequent to the passage of the plan at the November 1 5 th Special Town 
Meeting and the defeat of the ballot question at the December 5 th Special Election, the 
SPBC worked diligently to modify the construction plans to address concerns that had 
been raised by opponents to the original proposal. By the end of the month of December, 
plans were completed to hold another Special Town Meeting in January 2001. 

Significant progress was made during the year in our curriculum development efforts. 
The entire staff in grades Pre-kindergarten through 12 continued our Curriculum 
Mapping initiative. Throughout the year staff met at grade levels and across grade levels 
to discuss the "Maps" that had been developed. As a result of these efforts the Office of 
Curriculum and Technology was able to prioritize our funding and curriculum revision 
projects. 

In closing, I would like to thank the entire community for the support that we receive in 
educating the students in Medfield. Although we have difficult problems to solve, I 
continue to remain thankful for the positive and constructive attitude that exists in 



109 



Medfield to overcome these challenges. This spirit of community support for education 
is a primary reason we continue to achieve excellent results in student performance. I 
also would like to extend my thanks to all of the parents, teachers, support staff, 
administrators, school committee members and volunteers who have dedicated countless 
hours in achieving the goals of the Medfield Public Schools. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Robert C. Maguire 
Superintendent of Schools 




110 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STAFF DIRECTORY 



* * * * * 



CENTRAL OFFICE 



Robert C. Maguire, BA,MEd 

Cucinotta, Joseph, AS,BS,MEd 

Cave, Kim, BS,MS 

Suby, Carol, BS, Masters 

Leader, Kathleen 

Bennotti, Beverly 

Floser, Anna 

Hirtle, Patricia 

Kavanaugh, Mary 

Boucher, Richard 

Sullivan, Colleen 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director/ Finance & Operations 
Co-Director/Curriculum & Technology 
Co-Director/Curriculum & Technology 
Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
Secretary to the Superintendent 
Secretary to Dir/Finance & Operations 
Accounts Payable/Bookkeeper 
Payroll Officer 
Network Administrator 
Mail Transfer 



111 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Ashworth, Ann 


Principal 


BA, Miami University 


2000 






MS, The California State University, Fullerton 


Gibbs, David 


Dn. of Students 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1970 


Noble, Judith 


Dean of 


BS, University of NH 


1974 




Academics 


MEd, Worcester State College 




Davidson, Sandy 


Secretary 




1988 


Ingram, Maryjean 


Secretary 




1999 


Boyer, Laura 


Secretary 




2000 


Azer, Allen 


English 


BA, Northeastern University 
MS, Boston University 
MEd, Northeastern University 


1971 


Batts, Maura 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 


1993 


Bernier, Rita 


Art 


BA,BFA, Emmanuel College 
MEd,Lesley College 


1980 


Bertucci, Edward 


Science 


BS, University of Massachusetts 
MNS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 


1994 


Blessington, Patricia 


Business 


BS, California State/Long Beach 


1998 


Buckley, Sarah 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Bowdin College 


2000 


Callahan, George 


Mathematics 


BS, Boston College 
MA, Wesleyan University 


1964 


Cave, Michael 


Foreign Lang. 


BA, Southern Connecticut State 
MA,PhD, University of Connecticut 
MEd, Harvard 


1992 


Chase, Heather 


Wellness 


BS, Plymouth State 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1998 


Coppola, Judy 


Science 


AB, Our Lady of the Elms College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1977 


Cowell, Susan 


Wellness 


BS, Springfield College 


1984 


DeSorgher, Richard 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Mass/ Amherst 
MA, University of Mass/Boston 


1976 


Doherty, Candice 


Foreign Lang. 
(LOA) 


BA, University of Wisconsin 


1997 


Dugan, Ellen 


English 


BA, Mt. St. Mary College 


1987 


Flanagan, Jacqueline 


Mathematics 


BS, Boston University 
MS, Suffolk University 


1997 


Gait, Luanne 


Mathematics 


BA, Boston College 


1999 


Gibbons, Colleen 


Wellness 


BS, Bridgewater State College 


1997 


Goss, Anne 


Library Asistant 




1998 


Hamilton, Barbara 


Science 


BA, Wheaton College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1986 


Hardy, Adele 


Consumer & 

Family Science 


BS, Framingham State College 


1981 



112 



Heller, David 


Writing Center 


Hobson, Sarah 
Irwin, Ross 
Joseph, Vincent 


English/FL 
Mathematics 
Social Studies 


Karnakis, Victoria 
Kinch, Terry 

Kirby Jonathan 


Library Assistant 
Science Tech/ 
Computers 
Wellness/AD 


Kraemer, Michael 


Mathematics 


Kryzanek, Carol 


Science 


Lee, Christine 
Madrigal, Maria 
McDermott, Janet 


Social Studies 
Foreign Lang. 
English 


McLain, Lynne 
McNamara, Deborah 
Mehleis, Sarah 
Mullen, Stephanie 
Nickerson, Mark 


Science 
Library Assist. 
English 
Library Assist. 
Social Studies 


Olsen, Douglas 
Panciocco, John 


Dir. of Music 
Soc.Studies/TV 


Power, Michael 
Pratt, Suzanne 


Social Studies 
Science 


Ricciardi, Mary 


English 


Rosato, Marianne 


Mathematics 


Sabra, Ann Marie 
Sabra, Blake 

Santoro, Robert 


English 

Permanent Sub. 
Lnchrm. Assist. 
Foreign Lang. 


Scharak, Robin 


Foreign Lang. 


Schmidt, Joanne 


Librarian 


Shapiro, Richard 


Science 


Shea, Bernard 


Social Studies 


Spencer, Ann 


Mathematics 



BA, University of California, Santa Cruz 

MA, Emerson College 

BA, Dartmouth College 

BEd, Leeds University, England 

BS, University of Bridgeport 

MS, Fitchburg State College 

BS, SUNY at Brockport 

BS, University of Bridgeport 
MS, Cambridge College 
BA, College of the Holy Cross 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 
MME, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
BA, Bridgewater State College 
MA, University of Massachusetts 
B A, University of Massachusetts 
BA, Wellesley College 
BA, Regis College 
MAT, Boston College 
BS,MST, Boston College 

BS, University of Wisconsin 

BA, Gettysburg College 

Masters, Framingham State College 

BMusic,, University of Massachusetts 

BS, University of Maine 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, Boston College 

BS, University of Massachusetts 

MS, Central Connecticut State College 

BA, University of Massachusetts 

MAT, Tufts University 

BA, Boston College 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

BA, Worcester State College 



BA, Marietta College 

MA, Indiana University 

BA, SUNY at Buffalo 

MA, Boston University 

BS, Framingham State College 

MLIS, Simmons College 

BS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

MS, Northeastern University 

BA, Boston College 

MA, University of Massachusetts 

BA, Florida State University 

MEd, Lesley College 



2000 

1998 
1992 
1990 

1992 
1994 

1977 

1993 

1988 

1997 
2000 
1971 

1999 
1999 
1998 
1999 
1995 

1993 
1998- 

1999 
1971 

2000 

1998 

1995 
1998 

1970 

1969 

2000 

1981 

1966 

1976 



113 



Stevens, Nicholas Wellness BS, Springfield College 1995 

MEd, Cambridge College 
Stockbndge, Gary Social Studies BA, Framingham State 1970 

MEd, Cambridge College 
Thomas, Caroline English B A, State University of New York 1998 

MAT, Tufts University 
Tobiasson, Susan Art AA, Lasell College 1989 

BA, Southern Connecticut State University 
Woods, Jane Mathematics BA, MAT Bridgewater State College 1996 



114 



THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Mongiello, Margaret 
Hodne, Gordon 

McHugh, Elizabeth 
Croce, Jan 

O'Shaughnessy, Andrea 
Ammon, Robert 
Ayers, Sandra 
Bastianelli, Melissa 
Beltran, Maria 
Brackett, Kenneth 

Buckley, Susan 
Cobb, Shannon 

Cohen, Wendy 
Costa, Karen 



Craig, Kathleen 

Dalpe, Cynthia 

Davis, Lucinda 

Dawson, Sarah 

Demeritt, Deborah 

Dexter, Ryan 
Dora, Christine 
Dorrie, Alyssa 

Fahey, Loretta 
Farrell, Kara 

Farroba, Joseph 

Gagne, Ian 
Gross, Roseanne 



Hall, Angeline 



Principal 

Dean of Students 



BS,MA, Bowling Green State U. 

BA, Barrington College 

MEd, University of Mass/Boston 



Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Science 

English(LOA) 

Foreign Language(LOA) 

Foreign Language 

Physical Education 

Teacher/Lunchroom Assistant 

Library Assistant 

English 



BS,MEd, East Stroudsburg State 
BS, MEd, Boston State College 
BA, Boston College 
BS, Central University of Ecuador 
BS,Westfield State 



Science 

Health,PE,Family 
Consumer Science 
Content Specialist 
Mathematics 

Foreign Language 

Talent/Development 

Assistant 

Science/Rdng/English 

Science 

Music 

Mathematics 
Foreign Language 

Health Education 
Math 

Health/PE 

Reading 
Science 



Foreign Language 



BA, University of NH 
MAT, Simmons College 
BS, Simmons College 
BS,MEd, Bridgewater State 



BA, Webster College 
MA, Cambridge College 
BA, Worcester State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 



BA, Ohio Wesleyan University 

MA, University of Colorado 

BS, University of Connecticut 

Masters, Cambridge College 

Bachelor of Music 

BA,MS, State Univ. of NY 

BA, Boston College 

MAT, University of Massachusetts 

BS, University of Maine 

BS, Bridgewater State 

MEd, University of MA,Lowell 

BS, Boston State College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BS, Boston University 

BA, College of Our Lady of the 

Elms 

MA, Regis College 

CAGS, Bridgewater State College 

BA, Wheaton College 

MAT, Simmons College 



1997 
1966 

1998 
1999 
2000 
1967 
1995 
1997 
1997 
1997 

1998 
2000 

1988 
1987 



1981 

1986 

1999 

1997 

1974 

2000 
1999 
2000 

1980 
1998 

1978 

2000 
1970 



2000 



115 



Haycock, Jonathan 


Librarian 


Heam, Kezia 
Hellerstein, Seth 


Art 

Social Studies 


Hoffman, Janice 


English 


Horgan, Mary Susan 


Art 


Hubbard, Jacqueline 
Jalkut, Maryann 
Kee, Dianne 


English 

Eng/Soc. Studies 
Mathematics 


Krause, Dorothy 
Landry, Jennifer 


Social Studies 
Foreign Lang. 


Lewandowski, Keri 
Lombardi, Patricia 


Mathematics 
Mathematics 


McCarthy, Elaine 


Social Studies 


McConnell, Ellen 


English(LOA) 


McHugh, Joseph 


Social Studies 


McLear, Jessica 


Science 


Miller, Martha 


English/Reading 


Nelson, Carol 


English 


O'Neil, Joyce 
Parisi, Irene 
Parsons, John 


Physical Education 
Technology Assistant 
Science/Reading 


Potts, Eve 
Rahal, Sarah 


Consumer & Family 

Science 

English/Reading 


Richer, Jonathan 


Social Studies 


Stameris, Philip 


Mathematics 


Standring, Nancy 
Supko, Kristen 


Library Assistant 
Social Studies 



BS, Boston University 1998 

MEd, Boston University 

BA, Clark University 1999 

BA, Beloit College 1999 

MEd, University of CT 

CAS, Trinity College, VT 

BA, Emmanuel College 1973 

MA,University of Madrid, Spain 

BS, Moore College of Art & 1 975 

Design 

MA, Cambridge College 

BA,SUNY, Oswego,NY 2000 

BS, Framingham State College 1987 

BS, William Smith College 1 995 

MA, University of Buffalo 

BA, Framingham State College 1993 

BA, Concordia University 1999 

BEd, McGill University 

BS, Mathematics & Management 2000 

BA, St. Mary's College 1994 

MS, University of Notre Dame 

B A, University of Massachusetts 1994 

MA,Economics, Northeastern 

MAEd, MA (Mod.Spec.Needs), 

Eastern Nazarene College 

BA, Marymount College 1992 

MA, Northeastern University 

BS, Boston University 1965 

MS,Boston State/Univ. of Mass 

BA, Williams College 2000 

MEd, Harvard University 

BA, Framingham State College 1988 

MEd, State College at Boston 

B A, University of Massachusetts 1978 

MA, Boston College 

BS, University of Wisconsin 1 993 

2000 
BA, College of Wooster 1 998 

BS, Framingham State College 
BS, UCLA 2000 

MS, Framingham State 
BA, Villanova University 1 999 

MEd, Lesley College 
BS, University of Colorado 2000 

MAT, Simmons College 
BS, University of Massachusetts 1997 
MSMFGE, Boston University 
MAT, Simmons College 

1992 
BA,MAT, Connecticut College 2000 



116 



Tasker, Geraldine 


Social Studies 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1986 


Vaughn. Nathaniel 


Lang. Arts/Math 


BA, Trinity College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1998 


Vessa, Ben 


English/LA 


BS, Clarion University of PA 


1999 


Walker, Doris 


English 


BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 


1987 


Wroten, Theresa 


Music/Chorus 


Bachelor of Music 


2000 


Zaia, Diane 


Science 


AS, Westbrook College 
BS, Northeastern University 
MS, University of Rhode Island 


1995 



17 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



DeYoung, Richard 


Principal 


Cooley, Pauline 
Englehardt, Nancy 
Altoonian, Priscilla 
Bauer, Carol 
Belmont, Katherine 
Bernstein, Allison 


Secretary 
Secretary 

Technology Assist. 
Physical Education 
Grade 4 
Librarian(LOA) 


Brodeur, Amanda 


Grade 4 


Burnham, Elizabeth 


Grade 4 


Carey, Pauline 


Health 


Cauldwell, Mary 


Reading 


Crable, Heidi 
Curran, Kathleen 


Grade 5 
Grade 4 


Deveno, Nancy 


Art 


Douglas, Michael 


Grade 4 


Driscoll, Joan 
Farley, Virginia 
Harrington, Lauren 
Harris, Elizabeth 
Hinrichs, Deborah 


Lunchroom Assistant 
Strings/Music 
Grade 4 

Lunchroom Assistant 
Grade 4 


Hollister, Laura 


Grade 5 


Kirby, Joia 


Grade 4(LOA) 


Kristof, Ann 
Madden, Veronica 


Grade 4 
Grade 4 


Mason, Michael 


Grade 5 


McKechnie, Claire 


Grade 5 


McSherry, Stephanie 


Grade 4 



BA, Merrimack College 
MEd, Suffolk University 



BS, Springfield College 

BS, Framingham State College 

BA, SUNY/Albany 

MAT, Simmons College 

MSLS, Simmons College 

BA, Boston College 

MEd, Boston College 

BA, University of Maine 

MAT, Simmons College 

BS, Springfield College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BS, Bridgewater State College 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BS, University of Maine 

BS, University of Mass/ Amherst 

MBA, Northeastern University 

BSA, Mass. College of Art 

MSAE,Mass. College of Art 

BS, Stonehill College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 

Bachelor of Music & Education 
BA, Notre Dame College 

BS, University of New Hampshire 

MAElemEd, Lesley College 

BS, Simmons College 

MAElemEd, Simmons College 

BA, Trinity College 

MEd, Lesley College 

BS, Framingham State College 

BA, Assumption College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 

BS, Northeastern University 

MEd, Bridgewater State University 

BA, Boston College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, Trinity College 

MAT, Simmons College 



1995 

1981 
1997 
1999 
1999 
1971 
1996 



1999 

1999 

1992 

1974 

1994 
2000 

1993 

1995 

1997 
2000 
1967 
1997 
2000 

2000 

1996 

1974 
1999 

1989 

1977 

1998 



18 



Moon, Martha 
Moore, Emily 


Library Assistant 
Grade 5 


Moretti, Lynne 
Murray, Lauren 


Grade 4 
Grade 4(LOA) 


Nelson, Laura 


Grade 5 


O'Brien, Teri 
Olson, Janice 
Oxholm, Barbara 


Grade 5 
Grade 5 
Music 


Pendleton, Anne 


Reading 


Pope, William 


Physical Education 


Sager, Bethany 
White, Joseph 


Grade 5 
Grade 5 


Woodman, Susan 


Grade 5 



1992 
BA, Holy Cross College 2000 

MEd, Lesley College 
BS, Springfield College 1 999 

BA, Clark University 1 996 

MAT, Simmons College 
BA, University of Massachsuetts 1972 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, National College of Education 1984 
BS, Boston State College 1973 

BM, University of Lowell 1 999 

MM, New England Conservatory 
BS, University of Southern Maine 1 995 
MEd, University of Lowell 
Associate, Dean College 1977 

BS, Springfield College 
BA, Mount Holyoke College 1996 

BS, Northeastern University 1992 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 
BA, Boston University 1993 






119 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Pullman, Alan 


Principal 


Naughton, Karen 
Hicks, Donna 
Allyn, Cynthia 


Secretary 
Secretary 
Grade 2 


Beath, Maureen 
Busconi, Elizabeth 


Teacher/Lunchroom / 
Grade 2 


Carey, Ann 
Centore, Gwenneth 
Cowell, Thomas 
Crandall, Jane 


Grade 2 

Teacher Assistant 
Physical Education 
Grade 2 


Detweiler, Abigail 


Grade 3 


Dunlea, Cheryl 
Evenson, Sandra 


Grade 3 
Grade 2 


Featherman, Nancy 


Grade 2 


Frewald, Dorothy 
Grant, Ann 
Guthrie, Kristen 


Library Assistant 
Grade 2 
Grade 3 


Interrante, Janice 
Kuehl, James 


Grade 3 
Grade 3 


Larensen, Cynthia 


Grade 3 


Lynn, Rachel 


Grade 3 


Martin, Andrea 
McCabe, Karen 


Technology Assistant 
Health 


Meaney, Donna 
Middleton, Carol 


Technology Assistant 
Grade 3 


Mitchell, Lori 


Grade 2 



BA, American University 
MA,Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 



1998 



1985 
1989 
1970 



BS,Ed Lesley College 

MS, Lesley College 

CAS, Harvard Graduate School 

tant 2000 

AB, Boston University 1984 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BSEd, Framingham State College 1 97 1 

1985 
BA, University of Texas 1970 

BS, Castleton State College 1979 

MEd, Indiana University 
B A, Wellesley College 1996 

MAT, Simmons College 
BA, Boston College 1986 

AA, Vermont College 1970 

BS, Kent State University 
MEd, Antioch College 
BA, University of Massachsuetts 1972 
MEd, Lesley College 

1993 
B A, University of Massachusetts 1993 
B A, University of Vermont 1 997 

MEd, Boston University 
BA, Marywood University 1986 

BA, University of Arizona 1997 

MAT, Simmons College 
BS, Springfield College 1970 

MEd, Lesley College 
BS, North Adams State College 1997 
M,SpecEd, Framingham State College 

1992 
BS, Purdue University 1996 

MEd, Bridgewater State University 

1993 
BA, Gettysburg College 1985 

MEd, Lesley College 
BA, University of Colorado 2000 

MAT, Simmons College 



120 



Morns, Regina 
Murphy, Dorothy 


Grade 2 
Music 


Myers, Judith 


Reading 


Newton, Debra 


Grade 3 


Parker, Susan 


Art 


Pope, Susan 


Librarian 


Sheehan, Nicole 


Grade 3 


Slason, Michael 
Tascione, Mary Ann 


Physical Education 
Grade 2 


Troob, Cynthia 


Grade 2 


Watson, Erin 


Grade 3 


Wile, Jacqueline 


Reading Assist. 
Teacher Assistant/PS 



BS, MEd, Framrngham State 1976 

BA, Marymount College 1 978 
MEd, Lesley College 

BA, Clark University 1998 
MS, Long Island University 

BA, MEd, University of New 1 996 
Hampshire 

BS, Skidmore College 1978 
MEd, Lesley College 

BA, University of Vermont 1 979 
MLS, University of Illinois 

BSEd,Bridgewater State College 1994 
MSEd, Wheelock College 

BS, New Mexico Highlands Univ. 1986 

AB, Emmanuel College 1966 
MEd, Boston State College 

AA, Newton Junior College 1 969 
BS, Boston University 
MEd, Antioch College 

BA, University of New Hampshire 1995 
MEd, Lesley College 

1999 



21 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Safran, Janice 


Principal 


BA, American University 
MEd, Boston College 


1994 


Driscoll, Marcia 


Secretary 




1989 


Policella, Lynn 


Secretary 




1998 


Anelauskas, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Bianchi, Michelle 


Grade 1 


BSEd, University of Maine 
MEd, Lesley College 


1970 


Colantoni, Juliana 


Grade 1 


BS, Wheelock College 


1991 


Cronin, Susan 


Teacher Assistant/Lnchrm.Assistant 


2000 


DiMarzo, Barbara 


Grade 1 


BS, Boston State College 
MA, Lesley College 


1990 


Erickson, Margaret 


Grade 1 


BA, Washington College 
MAT, Simons College 


1996 


Gatti, Rosemary 


Teacher Assistant 




1986 


Grace, Herbert 


Physical Education 


BS, Keene State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Grace, Paula 


Kindergarten( LOA) 


BS, Westfield State College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1989 


Graham, Karen 


Physical Education 


BS, Boston University 


1989 


Green, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


1991 


Guilmette, Gail 


Kindergarten 


BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 


! 1988 


Hedberg, Marie 


Kindergarten 


AB, Boston College 


1999 


Imbrogna, Ann 


Kindergarten(LOA) 


BS, North Adams State College 


1991 






M,SpecEd, Bridgewater State College 


Johnson, Nicole 


Music 


BA, University of Mass 
MS, Simmons College 


2000 


Jones, Deborah 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Kay, Amy 


Grade 1 


BA,University of Massachusetts 
Med, Cambridge College 


2000 


Kinsman, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1980 


Maalouf, Raymonde 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Matson, Kathryn 


Technology Assistant 




1997 


McAvoy, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BS, Framingham State College 


2000 


McNicholas, Maura 


Teacher Assistant/Lnchrm.Assistant 


1998 


Mulock, Louise 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Nicholson, Margaret 


Grade 1 


BA, Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart 
MEd, Lesley College 


1978 


Nickerson, Jeninne 


Kindergarten 


BA, Bridgewater State 


1998 


O'Donnell, Ruth 


Teacher Assistant 




1991 


Oppel, Heidi 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Paget, Christine 


Grade 1 


BS, Framingham State College 


1990 



MEd, Lesley College 



122 



Pendergast, Marie 


Grade 1 


BA, University of MA 
MEd, University of MA 


1998 


Pollock, Allison 


Grade l(LOA) 


BA, University of Vermont 
MEd, Lesley College 


1992 


Reardon, Suzanne 


Reading Assistant 




1998 


Shay, Theresa 


Grade 1 


BSEd, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1972 


Shiff, Mary 


Art 


BFA, Mass. College of Art 


1997 


Silver, Andrea 


Kindergarten 


BA, American University 


2000 


Simpson, Sharon 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Singer, Laura 


Reading 


BS, St. Bonaventure University 
MA, University of Bridgeport 


1990 


Stoll, Tracey 


Kindergarten(LOA) 


BA, Ithaca College 
MEd, Lesley College 


1997 


Trasher, Andrea 


Grade 1 


BBA, Northeastern University 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 


1994 


Uns worth, Kelly 


Librarian 


BA,MEd, University of Mass. 


1999 



123 



PUPIL SERVICES 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



McArdle, Kathleen 



Lowd, Diane 
Mitchell, Kim 
Giessler, Jane 
Baine, Carol 



Banas, Debbie 



Director 



Secretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Psychologist 



Integrated Preschool 



BS, Fitchburg State College 
MS, Simmons College 
MBA, Boston University 



BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MEd, Boston University 
CAGS, Boston State College 
BA, University of Kentucky 
MA, University of Tennessee 



1995 



1998 
2000 
1988 
1972 



1996 



Birkett, Janet 


Paraprofessional 




2000 


Borona, Stacey 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Providence College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2000 


Bosh, Maryellen 


Psychologist 


BA, St. Anselm College 
MA, Tufts University 


1998 


Brown, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Cardell, Lois 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Michigan 


1980 


Chen, Joy 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, Oberlin College 
MS, Boston University 


1994 


Cordelia, Brenda 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


DelloRusso, Julie 


Learning Specialist 


BA,Med,Lehigh University 


1998 


De Young, Amy 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Dickey, Jennifer 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Donalds, Elizabeth 


Psychologist 


BFA, University of Colorado 
CAGS, Northeastern University 


2000 


Dunn, Jean 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Ellas, Christina 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Frauenberger, Gretchen 


School Physician 






Fuglestad, Joanne 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Gertner, Patricia 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Gordon, Beverly 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Pottsdam State University 
MSEd, The College of St. Rose 


1993 


Guglietta, Maureen 


Teacher Assistant 




1987 


Krah, Kerrie 


Speech/Language 


BS, Marquette University 
Master of Arts, Hofstra University 


2000 


Lavelle, Patricia 


Speech/ Language 


BA, Marywood College 
MEd, Northeastern University 


1994 


Lindgren, Bernadette 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Locke, Jessica 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Plymouth State College 


1999 



MS, Wheelock College 



124 



Lynch, Robert 

Mahoney, Mary 

Maier, Heidi 

May, Leslie 
Mello, Felicia 
Nickerson, Alexandra 
Nilson, Holly 

Noonan, Maria 
O'Reardon, Mary 
Ormbeg, Erik 

Orsogna-Muir, Connie 
Patch, Mary 
Person, Sarah 
Preikszas, Mary 
Pugatch, Diane 

Riccio, Julia 

Robinson, Judith 



Salka, Martin 

Salka, Nancy 

Samson, Susan 

Scheld, Nancy 
Seiler-Moon, Jill 
Singer, Margaret 

Sockol, Dawn 



Guidance 



Learning Specialist 

Speech/Language 

Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Inclusion Coord/S&Lang 



Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Guid/Related Arts 

Teacher Assistant 

Nurse 

Teacher Assistant 

Teacher Assistant 

Learning Specialist 

Speech/Language 

Learning Specialist 



Guidance 



Psychologist 



Nurse 



BS, Salem State College 1970 

MSEd, Boston State College 

BS, Wheelock College 1 995 

MEd, Cambridge College 

BA, Boston College 2000 

MS, Boston University 

2000 
1989 
1976 

BA, University of Massachusetts 1987 

MA, Washington State University 

2000 
2000 

BA, Ithaca College 1998 

MEd, Suffolk University 

1992 

BSN, University of Wisconsin 1 995 

1999 
1996 

BS, Boston University 1995 

MS,Ed, Lesley College 

BA, Bates College 2000 

MS, Teachres College, Columbia Univ. 

AB, Boston University 1988 

Masters, Newton College of 

the Sacred Heart 

AB, St. John's Seminary College 1966 

MEd, Boston College 

BS, Lesley College 1982 

MEd, Boston College 

BSN, Lowell State College 1999 

MS, Boston University 



Teacher Assistant 
Occupational Therapist Assistant 
Occupational Therapist BA, SUNY/Oneonta 

MA, Adelphi University 



Case Manager 



MS, Boston University 
BA,MEd, Michigan State Univ. 
CAGS, Rhode Island College 



1997 
1996 
1998 



1985 



Speroni, Richard 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Stack, Karen 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Bridgewater State College 


1998 


Strekalovsky, Elizabeth 


Psychologist 


BA, Middlebury College 

MEd, Lesley College 

MEd, CAGS, University of MA 




Sullivan, Barbara 


Teacher Assistant 




1995 


Sullivan, Virginia 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Boston State College 
MS, Boston State College 


1975 


Sutton, Clare 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Thompson, Kathleen 


Nurse 


BS, Salem State College 


1997 



125 



Turan, Sari 


Guidance 


BS, University of Massachusetts 
Med, Boston University 


2000 


Typadis, Angela 


Integrated Preschool 


BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 


1989 


Walunas, Kathryn 


Learning Specialist 


BA, Boston College 


1991 


Williams, Gail 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Unortheastern University 
Med, Cambridge College 


2000 


Wilson, Christopher 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Wood, Joan 


Nurse 


RN, Boston City Hospital School 


1975 



of Nursing 



Zrike, Sara 



Teacher Assistant/CDC 



1999 



126 



FOOD SERVICES 



Miller, Terry 

Andrews, Donna 

Bayramshein, Mary 

Clark, Heather 

Coop, Eva 

David, Denise 

DeRoche, Nancy 

Evans, Sandra (Manager) 

Hill, Mary 

Jones, Christina (Manager) 

Konevich, Stephanie (Manager) 

LaPlante, Laurie (Manager) 

Malouf, Georgette 

Mascaro, Phyllis 

McCarthy, Hazel 

Meagher, Michael (Supervisor) 

Mullen, Joanne 

Nelson, Carol (Manager) 

Norton, Nancy 

Stavris, Donna 

Szylkonis, Fran 



Secretary 
Dale Street School 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
Dale Street School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
High School 
Dale Street School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Blake Middle School 
Memorial School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
Memorial School 
Food Services 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
Dale Street School 
High School 
Blake Middle School 



PLANT MANAGEMENT 



Silverio, Robert 

Brown, Wayne 

Burton, Linda 

Currier, Richard (Head Custodian) 

Floser, Ronald 

Glassman, Barry 

Hinkley, Paul 

Howland, George (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Donald (Head Custodian) 

Kadehjian, Robert 

Landry, Leon 

MacPherson, John(Head Custodian) 

Martin, Henry 

Murphy, Brian 

Norian, Paul 

Quayle, Thomas 

Rogers, Thomas 

Spillaine, Bemie 

Stavris, Kenneth 

Suereth, Eric (Head Custodian) 

Volpicelli, Brian 



Director 

Middle School 

Dale Street School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Maintenance 

Central Office 

Memorial School 

High School 

Memorial School 

Maintenance 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Dale Street School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Maintenance 

Blake Middle School 

Maintenance Technician 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Ralph Wheelock School 



127 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE 
AND OPERATIONS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Over the past year ending December 31, 2000, the Medfield Public Schools have 
identified and addressed several issues regarding the maintenance and facilities needs of 
the schools. 

After developing a five(5) year capital budget plan, the School Committee, in conjunction 
with the Capital Planning Committee has funded several short- and long-term facility 
objectives in order to keep the Town's facilities functional, safe, and attractive. 

Last year, at a Special Town Meeting on November 8, 1999, the Town voted to 
appropriate $250,000 for site work, preliminary design, and construction cost to address 
school needs under the direction of the School Planning and Building Committee. In 
February, The Design Partnership of Cambridge, Inc. was hired to take recommendations 
from the School Feasibility Study Committee and finalize the following: (1) the 
expansion of the high school and its conversion to a middle school; (2) the expansion and 
renovation of the middle school and its conversion to a high school; and (3) the building 
of a new elementary school at the Wheelock campus, instead of an addition and 
renovation to the existing Memorial School. 

At a Special Town Meeting on November 15, 2000, the Town approved a $57.4 million 
building project; however, at the December 5 th special election, the article was defeated. 
Currently, the School Planning and Building Committee and School Committee have 
conducted several open meetings to formulate a revision to the original plans to be 
presented at a Special Town Meeting on January 22, 2001. 

The Town granted a total of $123,520 in capital outlay funding to the schools. These 
funds were used to purchase a utility truck with plow attachment for the maintenance 
staff and to construct two (2) modular classrooms at the Dale Street School. 

Again, it has been our goal to fund on-going maintenance projects for all schools. We 
continue to replace rugs and classroom furniture and to paint classrooms each year. In 
addition, repairs to our infrastructure have been completed in the following areas: (1) 
boiler rooms; (2) pneumatic controls; (3) heating systems; and (4) plumbing and 
electrical repairs. On-going and continuous improvements of the buildings and grounds 
for the Medfield Schools must be a focus now and in the future. 



128 



The April 2000 Town Meeting approved the operational budget of $15,957,119, or 
9.45%. This was an increase of $1,377,181 over the previous year's budget. 

Last year the state provided supplemental aid of $270,366 to assist in the funding of the 
budget process that included extensive meetings and negotiations with the Warrant 
committee in order to reach an agreement on the FY2001 budget to avoid an override. 
Clearly, Medfield is one of the communities that received a small portion (16.5%) that 
funds our operational budget from the state. Knowing this, the School Committee and 
Administration have tried to work with the state legislators and representatives to help 
change the existing education funding formula in an attempt to get a larger portion of the 
state school funds. 

The School Committee and Administration are now in the process of developing the 
2001-02 fiscal year budget. The process of developing this budget begins in September 
with the input from numerous groups: principals, superintendent of schools, director of 
finance and operations, site councils, content specialists and school committee. All these 
groups have an important part in preparing the school budget. 

Enrollment is a large factor in determining the school's budget. Over the past three(3) 
years, Medfield has seen an increase in student population of approximately 239 students. 
This increase in student enrollment has been the driving force for the increased need of 
services and staff required in all the schools. 

The School Committee, Administration, and School Planning and Building Committee 
have indicated that the enrollment will continue to grow over the next ten(10) years 
creating a shortage of classroom space and infrastructure at the secondary level. 

The School Lunch Program continues to provide appetizing, nutritional and well- 
balanced meals that are low in sodium and fat content. Our weekly menus offer baked 
products, instead of fried foods. Our school lunch offers meals that the students will 
purchase, as well as meals that are nutritionally healthy. Total participation has shown an 
increase with approximately 55% of the students participating. 

Promoting good health and nutrition has always been a concern. Government regulations 
require that our school lunch program comply with the American Dietary Guidelines 
including foods from the food pyramid. 

We are proud to report that our school lunch program is financially solvent (a self- 
sufficient operation). Our kitchens are in good physical condition, and we continue to 
upgrade and replace equipment in all our schools to insure that proper sanitation 
requirements are met. 



129 



In closing, the community of Medfield can be proud of its educational system and I look 
forward to working with the residents and town officials in the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph P. Cucinotta 

Director of Finance and Operations 




130 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY 
HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Amos Clark Kingsbury (Medfield) High School, I respectfully submit 
our Annual Report for the school year ending December 31, 2000. 

The official enrollment for the high school for the 1999-2000 school year was 626 
students. Our October 2000 enrollment reflected 666 students. One hundred fifty (150) 
students graduated in the class of 2000. Of these, 93.9 percent have gone on to further 
their studies at post-secondary institutions of learning. Students in this class hold the 
distinction of ranking number one among all high schools when they took the first MCAS 
(Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System) test in 10 th grade. Based on this 
1998 MCAS, 57 graduating seniors were eligible to apply for a Certificate of Mastery 
through the Department of Education, indicating these students achieved at least two 
'advanced' and one 'proficient' score on the assessment. 

The school year was marked by great achievement on the part of many students. In the 
National Honor Society were 31 percent of the members of the graduating class. Anne 
Martin and Kimberly Zaia were selected as Honor Essayists by the high school faculty 
and were presented with their awards after their speeches at the graduation ceremony in 
June. 

The National Merit Scholarship Corporation honored a number of students for academic 
excellence. Commended students (based on their 1999 PS AT scores) were: Gregory R. 
Monahan, Hameer H. Thatte, and Ashley Wilhelm. Named as Semi-Finalists in the 2001 
Merit Scholarship Competition were Carolyn N. Ashcroft, Benjamin D. Nye, and Tairan 
Zhang. These students are in a select group representing the top one-half of one percent 
of students who take this test; they will compete for approximately 6000 scholarships to 
be awarded in the spring of 2000. 

More than 99 percent of our graduating seniors took the College Board Examinations. 
Our SAT I and SAT II scores were well above state and national averages and showed 
marked improvement from the previous year. We are pleased to announce that our verbal 
mean score was 587 (an increase of 22 points from the previous two years); our 
mathematics mean score was 581 (also an increase of 22 points from the previous year). 

Medfield High School students also excelled beyond the classroom. Nearly ninety 
percent of the student body elected to participate in student government, a school club, 
music, drama, or athletic programs. Students in our music program competed at a music 
festival in New York in the spring where the Concert Band took second place, the Jazz 
Choir took third place, and the Jazz Ensemble took first place. In the fall of 2000, the 



131 



Medfield High School athletic program was once again awarded the prestigious Earnest 
Dalton Award, given to the school with the best winning percentage in Division III 
athletics in the Commonwealth. 

Professional development goals for faculty and staff included a major effort in 
Curriculum Mapping. Faculty in-service programs included curriculum mapping and 
differentiated instruction to maximize the potential for all learners. 

In April 2000, Medfield High School was awarded a full ten-year reaccreditation from 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Included in the report were a 
number of accolades for our strong emphasis on academic programs. The faculty 
continues to work on the next step in the reaccreditation process of addressing the 
recommendations outlined in the report. Both short-term and long-range priorities 
include addressing the space and facility needs created by our burgeoning enrollment as 
well as continuing to identify and select quality faculty for our students. Additional goals 
include continuation of the Curriculum Mapping and Differentiated Instruction models to 
support the teaching and learning process. 

In April, Ann Ashworth was appointed principal, following Robert Maguire's earlier 
appointment as Superintendent of Schools. Judith Noble served as Interim Principal 
during the 1999-2000 school year. Michael Kraemer, mathematics teacher, earned his 
National Board Professional Teaching Standards Certification in April. Richard 
DeSorgher was announced as the second recipient of the "Hall of Excellence" award, 
given to a Medfield High School graduate whose effort and participation in his high 
school experience has led to a successful, productive, rewarding and distinguished career. J 
In addition, Mr. DeSorgher was selected as a recipient of the Goldin Award for 
Excellence in Teaching, sponsored by The Education Cooperative (TEC). 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I am extremely pleased with the many 
achievements of our students and faculty. On behalf of all of our stakeholders, I take this 
opportunity to thank the following groups and individuals for their generosity to high 
school students and programs: Medfield High School Boosters; the Medfield Coalition; 
the School Committee; the School Planning and Building Committee; the Superintendent 
of Schools and the many parents and community members for their continued support oj 
young people and their programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann L. Ashworth 
Principal 



132 



GRADUATICM 
EXERCISES OF 



MEDFIELD 



HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 2000 



SUNDAY, JUME 4, 2000 - 2:00 PM 



33 



PRESENTED AT SENIORS HONORS RECOGNITION NIGHT, MAY 17, 2000 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

University of CO/Boulder Dept. of Theatre & Dance Freshman Scholarship. . .Bryan Wilson 

Massachusetts High School Drama Guild Scholarship Bryan Wilson 

Denison University Provost's Award Laura Parker 

Saint Anselm Family Grant Caitlin Gavaghan 

Saint Anselm College Grant Caitlin Gavaghan 

Brandeis University Presidential Award Katharine Braun-Levir.e 

University of New Hampshire Non-Resident Grant Laura Stavris 

University of New Hampshire Grant Laura Stavris 

The Boston Globe Award Program Scholarship Morgan Gavaletz 

Joseph Gill 

Lauren Mulock 

J. Christopher Walsh 

Shaw's Supermarkets, Inc. Scholarship Andrew Lippman 

Daniel Webster College Performance Scholarship Christopher Miller 

International Union of Operating Engineers SAC Scholarship Christopher Miller 

Guilford College Achievement Award David Thomas 

Friends of Guilford College Scholarship David Thomas 

St. Lawrence University 1856 Achievement Award Lauren Foran 

Fairfield University Grant Kristen Keleher 

Fairfield Athletic Grant Kristen Keleher 

Footaction USA Hooked On Sports Scholarship Kristen Keleher 

Smith College Book Award Shannon Hunt 

Hartwick College Samuel Nelson Scholarship Matthew Szymkowicz 

Washington University's Thomas H. Eliot Scholarship Daniel Parsons 

Assumption College Aquinas Scholarship Tara OT)onnell 

University of Massachusetts/Amherst Academic Achievement Grant Hope Cole 

University of Rhode Island Centennial Scholarship Jessica Cole 

Pratt Institute Presidential Scholarship Jenne Nitishin 

Pratt Institute Grant Jenne Nitishin 

Radford University Dean's Scholarship Lauren Maffucci 

Vassar College Scholarship Sarah Krasnow 

Medway Federation of Teachers Scholarship Tyler Aronne 

The George Washington University Presidential Academic Scholarship. . . .Margaret Murray 

United States Air Force Academy Appointment Lindsey Bauer 

Saint Anselm College Grant Kevin Kriston 



134 



DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS 
ART: 

Art Achievement Awards Jessica Cole 

Jenne Nitishin 

Boston Globe Gold Key Awards Kelley Burkhart 

Jenne Nitishin 
Tanya Reichert 

Boston Globe Silver Key Award Jessica Cole 

Boston Globe Honorable Mention Awards Audrey Hall 

Joanna Hersey 

ENGLISH: 

English Awards Anne Martin 

Geoffrey Harcourt 

Creative Writing Award Daniel Parsons 

Speech Award Katelyn Brown 

Literary Magazine Awards Christopher Harrington 

Daniel Parsons 
Yearbook Award E. Morgan Gavaletz 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 

French Award Sarah Krasnow 

Spanish Award Tara OTDonnell 

MATHEMATICS: 

Mathematics Awards Julie Browne 

Albert Gong 
Kimberly Zaia 

MUSIC: 

National School Orchestra Award Karen Prager 

John Philip Sousa Band Awards Michelle Priante 

Kimberly Zaia 

Louis Armstrong Jazz Award Christina Roache 

National School Choral Award Margaret Murray 

SCIENCE: 

Biology Award Kimberly Zaia 

Biotechnology Award Kelly Hogan 

Chemistry Awards Katharine Braun-Levine 

Julie Browne 

Physics Award Kimberly Zaia 

Electronics and Emerging Technology Award Albert Gong 

Society of Women Engineers Highest Honors Kimberly Zaia 

High Honors Anne Martin 

Honors Julie Browne 

SOCIAL STUDIES: 

Social Studies Award Margaret Murray 

Daughters of The American Revolution Award Kimberly Zaia 

NORFOLK COUNTY TEACHERS ASSOCIATION AWARD Karen Prager 

PAT KALLIO SERVICE AWARDS: 

Kevin Brady Albert Gong Karen Prager 

Alexis Exarhopoulos Sarah Krasnow Jennifer Rudnick 

Jonathan Minnaert 



135 



Tim Bussow Memorial Scholarship Susan Bussow 

(Sponsored in part by Coca Cola) 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Awards Sarah Mehleis 

Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Award 

Medfield Soccer, Inc. Scholarships Jonathan Kirby 

M.H.S. Athletic Association Scholar/ Athlete Awards 

Medfield Youth Basketball Association Herbert Grace 

Bob Porack Memorial Awards 

Proud To Be Substance Free Sandra Keating 

Alex Monahan 

Student Council Awards Richard DeSorgher 

Friends of the Medfield Library Amy Fiske Creative Writing Award 

Charles P. Love Memorial Scholarship 

National Honor Society Scholarships Richard Shapiro 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship 

Milford-Whitinsville Regional Hospital Scholarship 

Medfield Music Association Scholarship Lynn Prager 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Richard Pearson 

William Palumbo Baseball Scholarship 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards 

Medfield School Spirit Awards Deborah McNamara 

Medfield School Boosters Awards 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Award David Gibbs 

Peter Kennedy Memorial Scholarship 

Medfield In-town Charities 

Medfield Youth Sports Boosters Scholarships Thomas McNeil 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship Robert Naughton 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship Barbara Reynolds 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship Lauren Bonney 

Peter Panciocco Award Mark Ruggiero 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Mary Harney 

Hannah Adams/ Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

Steven Kramer Chairperson, Medfield School Committee 

Robert Maguire Superintendent of Schools 

Judith Noble Interim Principal 

recessional Medfield High School Band 

'PLEASE REFRAIN FROM APPLAUSE UNTIL ALL GRADUATES HAVE RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS 



136 



GRADUATION PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 

Richard Pearson, Director 

NATIONAL ANTHEM Katelyn Brown 

OPENING REMARKS Robert Maguire 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME Geoffrey Harcourt 

President, Class of 2000 

HONOR ESSAYISTS Anne Martin 

Kimberly Zaia 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Anne Gordon 

Treasurer, Class of 2000 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 2000 Steven Kramer 

Chairperson, Medfield School Committee 

CHORAL SELECTION Senior Choir 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Honors Awards Judith Noble 

Interim Principal 

The League of Women Voters of Medfield Carolyn Casey 

Community Service Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Award 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarships 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship James Caine 

In Memory of Roger C. Rao Medfield School Committee 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship 

Potpourri Collection Scholarship 

Thomas Family Dental Services Scholarship. William Tosches 

Medfield School Committee 
Robert Flagg Memorial Scholarship 

Bayer Corporation Diagnostics Scholarships 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary June Doucette 

American Legion Scholarships Frederick Miller 

Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship 

Melville Mills Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships 

American Legion, Beckwith Post 110 Medals 

Sons of The Legion Scholarship 

Medfield Youth Baseball Scholarships Vincent Maffucci 

Medfield Italian American Cultural Association Scholarship Frank Zappulla 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Earl Wilson 



137 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2000 



GREGORY JOHN ABA20RIUS 

CH10MA NNEKA ADUBA 

MATTHEW THOMAS ALTIMAR 
*ANI MELANIE ALTOONIAN 

CHAD PAUL ANGELL 

TYLER 3LAISE ARONNE 
"LINDSEY ANNE BAUER 
•KEVIN ROBERT BRADY 

KAREN MARGARET BRANDOLO 
'KATHARINE ALEXIS 3RAUN-LEVINE 

SCOTT CHARLES BROOKS 
"KATELYN MARTHA BROWN 
•JULIE LINDSEY BROWNE 

KELLEY LOUISE 3URKHART 
JAIME LAUREN CARROLL 

.NDIRA VENKATA CHIVUKULA 
'(CATHERINE ELIZABETH CLAUSEN 

RICHARD PAUL CODY 
'HOPE ANN COLE 
•JESSICA ARLENE COLE 

MICHAEL DANIEL JOMMANE 

JENNIFER CLARICE CONNORS 
•ALEXIS EXARHOPOULOS 
'LAUREN ICATE FLEMING 
'LAUREN ELIZABETH FORAN 

JOHN THOMAS FRIEL 

CA1TLIN MARIE GAVAGHAN 

ERIN MORGAN GALVALETZ 

ARTIE PETER GECRGACOPOULOS 
JOSEPH LAWRENCE GILL 
'\MY MARGARET GIPS 

DANIEL MATTHEW GOLTZ 
'AL3ERT GORDON GONG 

ANNE FRANCES GORDON 

ANDREW COURTNEY GREENAWAY 

ERYN THERESA GRIFFIN 
•HOLLY MELISSA GUDAITIS 

AUDREY LOUISE HALL 

CHRISTOPHER DANIEL HALVERSON 
•GEOFFREY SEAN HARCOURT 

SARAH aCSE HARDY 
"CHRISTOPHER DEVERE HARRINGTON 

JOHN PATRICK HERNANDEZ 

JOANNA MARIE HERSEY 

SUSAN ELIZABETH HILL 

KELLY SUZANNE HCGAN 
'SHANNON LAUREEN HUNT 
VCATHERINE ANNE 3CRIS HUNTER 

SCOTT WALKER IKENBERRY 

MICHELLE HAWKRIDGE JACQUES 



CATHERINE MARIE JORDAN 

KRISTEN MARIE KELEHER 

BRYAN ROCH KELLY 
'ERIN MARIE KELLY 

KATRINA LEIGH KELLY 

KATHRYN ANNE KER1NS 
'SARAH ANN KRASNOW 

Kevin joseph kriston 

rebecca marie lahaie 

jess piergentil1 lane 

christine elizabeth larson 

karen marie leach 

min young lee 
•heather jane lepisto 

kristen dorothy lepisto 

emily louise lieberman 
'andrew simpson lippman 

ROBERT ANTHONY MacCREADY 

'KELLY ROBIN MacDONALD 
LAUREN MARIE MAFFUCCI 

'KATRINA MARIE MAJKUT 

*ANNE CHASE MARTIN 
CHRISTINE MARIE MARTIN 

*KERI ELIZABETH MARTIN 

*KATE MEYER MAWHINNEY 
KARA LYNN MAY 

•KEVIN SWEENEY McCABE 
EAMON JOSEPH MCINTYRE 
RICHARD BRUCE MCMACKIN 
RE3EKAH ANN MCNAMARA 

'EMILY KATHLEEN MCNEIL 
MELISSA BROOKE MERIDITH 
CHRISTOPHER ANDREW MILLER 
JONATHAN MICHAEL MINNAERT 

'JASON ARTHUR MOMBOURQUETTE 
IAN MERCER MOON 
KEVIN JAMES MORRISSEY 
LAUREN MACRINA MULOCK 

•JOHN CULLEN MURPHY 
FRANCIS XAVIER MURRAY III 

•MARGARET ANNE MURRAY 
JENNE ILLISA N1TISHIN 
JENNIFER LYNN O'CONNOR 
ROBERT DUNLAP O'DONNELL 
TARA MARJE O'DONNELL 
THOMAS JAMES TOOLE 
BLAKE JONATHAN PANTUCK 
LAURA HOWE PARKER 
DANIEL JON PARSONS 



SARA ELIZABETH PATCH 
DEANNA LEE PICARDI 
BENJAMIN MICHAEL PICCIR1LL0 
CHRISTOPHER ADAM PICCIRILLO 

•KAREN MARGARET PRAGER 

•MICHELLE ANNE PR1ANTE 
MARK JOSEPH QUINNAN 
DENNIS JOHN RAPA 
DAVID JOHN RECCO 
TANYA NICOLE REICHERT 
ALLISON ANNE RICHMANN 

•CHRISTINA MARIE ROACHE 
►•KATHLEEN MAURA ROBINSON 

"JENNIFER ANN RUDNICK 
MICHAEL FUAD SABRA 
MEGHAN CATHERINE SAMMARCO 
ALLISON ELIZABETH SANDELLA 
^•LA-UREN ANN SCHMIDT 
JONATHAN DAVID SCHWARTZ 

•DOMINIQUE SUPPES SEMERARO 
JESSICA DICKINSON SHAW 
LAURA MARIE STAVRIS 
AMANDA LEIGH STEVENS 
RANDALL ALEXANDER STEWART 

•SARAH ELIZABETH STRIMAITIS 

•DARCY SUZANNE SWAIN 
MATTHEW EDWARD SZYMKOWtCZ 
MICHAEL ANDREW TAGGART 
JENNIFER MAREN TERRENZI 
ERIC JAY TERWILLIGER 
DAVID MILLER THOMAS 
RORY ELIZABETH TRAHAN 
HEATHER LYNNE TRUMBOUR 
JORDAN RUDA VALLON 

•JENNIFER KATE VILLONE 
KRISTIN ANNE VINAL 
JESSIE VIRGINIA VOLLMUTH 

•JOANNE MARILYN VOZZELLA 
JAMES CHRISTOPHER WALSH 

•RASIKA WELANKIWAR 
JESSICA MARIE WELLS 
TANYA LEE WERNING 
KENNETH THOMAS WHELAN 
BRANDON KERR WILHELM 
BRYAN FARRELL WILSON 
FMILY MICHELLE WORMWOOD 
BRIAN DAVID WRIGHT 
SCOTT ANDREW WRIGHT 
EMILY LOU YOULDEN 

•KIMBERLY ANN ZAIA 



MARSHALLS 



MATTHEW BROWN 



JOELLESOBIN 



"NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 
RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 



138 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Thomas A. Blake Middle School, it is my pleasure to submit this 
annual report for the year ending December 31, 2000. This is my fourth Annual Report 
for the Town of Medfield, and since my arrival, I have seen the student population 
increase by over 200 students and the staff accordingly. The building is at capacity, and 
many areas are inappropriately occupied to meet the demands of the educational 
programs. But this increase in population has also brought a renewed emphasis on 
community as we work to meet the academic, social and emotional needs of emerging 
adolescents and their parents. We have also focused our energies during this last year on 
aligning our curriculum with the state standards and expanding our delivery program to 
meet the needs of the varied learners at Blake. We have expanded our professional 
development for staff and our enrichment opportunities for students while continuing to 
help our community combat prejudice and embrace diversity. 

As middle school years can often be a challenging time for parents, we expanded our 
efforts to communicate between school and home. In addition to our successful seventh 
grade parent Quest program, we added a sixth and eighth grade component. Sixth grade 
parents explored "Getting to Know Your Middle School Child as a Learner" and eighth 
grade parents discussed "Smart Decision Making". We continued our outreach to 
upcoming sixth grade parents in May and hosted our Back to School Nights for all three 
grades. Our CSA parent handbook also served to help parents stay in touch with the 
school. For the first time last year, we sponsored a student and parent assembly program. 
Moctar Tayeb, an escaped slave for Moratania, spoke to students about the struggles of 
his people, and then with the CSA and the town-wide religious community, an evening 
presentation was hosted for parents and interested community members. 

We also expanded our program with a pilot year of peer mediation. Twenty-seven 
seventh graders along with ten staff members under the guidance of Karen Nardone were 
trained in peer mediation and peer leadership. We are hoping to receive grant funds to 
incorporate this program into the seventh grade experience. 

For the third year in a row, our eighth graders scored quite well on the MCAS exams. Our 
scores in all four areas increased, and overall we ranked number two in the state for our 
combined scores. For the second year, we were first in the state in Social Studies while 
93% of our students scored proficient or better in English, placing us second in 
English/Language Arts in the State. Both our math and science scores increased as we 
had worked during the last year to align and enrich these programs. 



139 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal for the Dale Street School, I am delighted to submit this report for the year 
ending December 31, 2000. 

ENROLLMENT 

Enrollment at Dale Street School as of October 1, 2000 was 248 students in grade four 
and 258 students in grade five, for a total of 506 students. The average class size was 23 
students per class. 

INSTRUCTIONAL HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS 

The major focus this year has been on the development of curriculum maps for 
mathematics. The completion of calendar maps for grades four and five was an 
important step in bringing the school curriculum in line with the State of Massachusetts 
Curriculum Frameworks. 

This was the second year (of a two-year cycle) of monthly themes in our Character 
Education Program. Honesty, cooperation, humility and peace were the themes covered 
during the first four months of school. Students continue to have weekly discussions in 
the classrooms and whole-school assemblies provide an opportunity for classes to come 
together to share ideas and allow students to demonstrate lessons learned. This year as 
part of the Character Education Program a home/school connection was developed. 

Our students continue to use the tools of technology. The Internet and software such as 
Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, and Excel Programs supported learning and research report 
presentation. 

All Dale Street School fourth graders continued to take part in the Massachusetts 
Comprehensive Assessment System tests that were given last May. MCAS tests were 
given in English/Language Arts, Science and Technology, and Mathematics. An MCAS 
test for Social Studies was given to fifth grade students. 

Dale Street School students continued their participation in a number of enrichment 
activities. As part of the unit of study on oceans, grade four students visited the New 
England Aquarium for a water study of the Boston Harbor. They also enjoyed a 
performance of Anne of Green Gables at the Wheelock Family Theatre, and visits to the 
Franklin Park Zoo and Duxbury Beach. The fourth grade was visited by High Touch- 
High Tech, a hands-on science lab entitled The Power of Light. Fifth grade students 
attended a performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and visited the Museum of 
Science. Fifth graders also enjoyed an enriching presentation of Pyramids and Pharaohs. 



142 



School-wide enrichment included the continuation of our Intramural Program, the 
Bullying and Teasing Program, a performance by Scott Canon, participation in the 
National Geography Bee, a visit from World of Snakes, and a performance by the Magic 
ofLyn. 

STAFF IN-SERVICE TRAINING 

During the past year all Dale Street School teachers took part in the very important in- 
service work as part of the district's curriculum mapping initiative. The focus for fourth 
and fifth grade teachers was mapping the mathematics curriculum. Special subject 
teachers also began to develop curriculum maps for Art, Music, Health and Physical 
Education. The maps are currently being reviewed for each grade level, kindergarten to 
grade 12. This initiative will be a three to five-year process and will create curriculum 
maps in all subject areas to ensure curriculum articulation and coordination in 
kindergarten to grade 12. 

STAFF RECOGNITION 

Grade five teachers Mrs. Miriam Baldwin and Mrs. Kathryn Touhey retired after many 
years of service to the Town of Medfield. 

PUBLIC/PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 

Throughout the school year, the Dale Street School Council and the Community School 
Association (CSA) have provided opportunities for parental involvement with the goal of 
strengthening the tie between home and school. The continuation of our community 
service program continues to be the highlight of the parents' efforts. The following list 
contains a few of the important initiatives that resulted from the CSA's on-going efforts: 

• Funding a three- week author's residency 

• Addition of computers to the Library Media Center 

• Create- A-Craft Fair, Kids Night Out 

• Fundraisers: Yankee Candle, Box Tops for Education, SCRIP, A+ 
America 

• School volunteer programs 

The School Council continues to support the development of school goals and to annually 
review the curriculum guides, Student/Parent Handbook, and Parent Information Night. 



143 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

The Beacon Program provides students opportunities to serve the community as 
volunteers at the Public Library, the Animal Shelter, the Park and Recreation 
Department, and the Fire Department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard L. DeYoung 
Principal 




144 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Please accept this report regarding the educational programs and co-curricular activities 
of the Ralph Wheelock School for the year ending December 31, 2000. This is my 
second annual report for the Town of Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Wheelock School's enrollment, as of October 1, 2000, totals 485 students: 257 in 
grade two and 228 in grade three. In addition, the two ACCEPT Collaborative classes 
and The Education Collaborative (TEC) class housed within our school has a total of 16 
students enrolled. The school currently houses twelve sections of grade two and ten 
sections of grade three. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The Wheelock faculty and staff continue to participate in many professional development 
activities that take the form of workshops, graduate level courses, lectures and attendance 
at meetings, conventions and symposia on a wide range of education related topics. 

The town-wide process of curriculum mapping, plotting the year's units of study in each 
subject has continued at Wheelock this year. We have completed our Mathematics maps, 
and are working on Science and Social Studies during the current school year. 

Our staff has also participated in workshops to help themselves and their students to 
properly integrate technology into the curriculum. Our school's web page 
http://medfield.net/ - then click on Wheelock ; is up and running and is being revised as 
we learn more about integrating this technology into our communication link with the 
community. 

Most of our professional staff completed a graduate level course entitled Exploring 
Pathways to Learning, which provides important information about the various learning 
styles of our students, and about the ways each learner perceives and processes 
information. We have studied our own learning styles and comfort zones, and are 
learning new ways to present lessons and assessments so that they might be more 
accessible to students who learn in a variety of ways. We are integrating the material 
from the Pathways course with information about Differentiated Instruction. The 
strategies are most useful in finding effective ways to deliver the Medfield curriculum to 
our students. 



145 



PARENT EDUCATION 

Each month at CSA meetings, there is a presentation regarding academic or social 
development at Wheelock School. These presentations have included an explanation of 
curriculum mapping and several demonstrations of educational software, which are 
available for student use, such as Inspiration and Tenth Planet. We also explored the 
Internet and visited sites that are designed for parents dealing with academic, social and 
societal issues facing students today, including a tour of our school's website. 

Parents continue to take an active role at Wheelock, supporting curriculum initiatives 
such as our annual Pilgrim Feast, and trips to Plimoth Plantation, the Boston Museum of 
Science, and the Worcester Ecotarium. Community participation is also appreciated, and 
once again, the Girl Scouts helped out at our Feast by tending the cooking fires and 
demonstrating authentic colonial cooking techniques at our Pilgrim Feast at Rocky 
Woods. 



FUTURE TRENDS / PRIORITIES / ACHIEVEMENTS 

Our Site Council has formalized our series of assemblies celebrating student work and 
focusing upon monthly themes as a school goal. We have held assemblies that featured 
the Olympics in Sydney, Australia, and this year's presidential election. The Olympics 
assembly ended with all 485 of our students completing an obstacle course specially 
designed for the event by our Physical Education Staff. The Elections Assembly was 
unique in that we were fortunate enough to have been joined by students from the Blake 
Middle School who conducted a mock presidential debate for our third graders. 

We are fortunate to be supported by many members of the Medfield community as both 
students from the high school and several of Medfield's senior citizens work in our 
classrooms. The high school teacher aides and the senior volunteers work with small 
groups or individual children in reading and writing groups or in other ways that support 
academic growth. 



Our efforts to map the curriculum continue, with the goal of producing a yearlong pictun 
of major units of study and objectives within each unit. We have made a wonderful start 
and are working together with colleagues from all Medfield schools in this regard. 
Members of our staff are studying with mapping expert Heidi Hayes Jacobs via video 
conferencing to help guide our efforts as we craft "essential questions" which accompan 
each unit of study. 



: 

1. 
° 



Our physical plant, thanks to the efforts of our fine custodial crew, continues to be in 
good shape, and we are proceeding with plans to upgrade furniture and rugs that have 



146 



been in service for over thirty years. The CSA has continued its multi-stage playground 
upgrade, and the second installation was made last summer. 

We have accomplished our goal of having new PCs in each classroom; each linked to 
color printers and to the Internet. Our staff continues training to learn how to best 
integrate this technology for the betterment of our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Alan Pullman 
Principal 





147 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Memorial School, I respectfully submit my annual report for the 
school year ending December 31, 2000. This is my sixth annual report for the Town ofl 
Medfield. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Integrated Preschool continues at the Memorial School providing a developmentally 
appropriate program for three and four year old children, both with and without special 
needs. There were 43 children enrolled as October 1, 2000 in both the morning and 
afternoon sessions. 

Once again, the Memorial School kindergarten experienced an enrollment growth this 
year. There were 236 children enrolled in eleven sections of kindergarten and 232 
children enrolled in ten sections of first grade. The number of sections of first grade 
decreased by one this year. The average class size for kindergarten was 21 students. The 
first grade classes had an average class size of 23 students. 

Two new teachers, one in first grade and one in kindergarten were added to our school in 
September in response to child rearing leaves. The Medfield After School Program 
(MAP) continues in the modular classroom attached to our school. This program 
provides an extended day for kindergarten and first grade children whose parents' work 
situations require day care for their families or for additional social opportunities for the 
children. Project Accept also had a program in our school for children with special 
needs. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

The teachers at the Memorial School were all involved in a variety of professional 
development activities during the past year and will continue throughout the upcoming 
year. These opportunities are important for teachers to learn new ideas and network with 
other professionals. 

Much of the professional development this year focused on teachers expanding their 
knowledge of curriculum mapping. This was a system-wide initiative which brought 
teachers together from all five schools to exchange information about curriculum and 
how it flows from one grade level to the next. In addition, teachers explored ways to 
differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners in the classroom. Several 
teachers at Memorial School experienced valuable training and support regarding the 
inclusion of special needs children in their classrooms. Teachers also continued to 



148 



expand opportunities for children who are able to learn at a faster rate than their peers do. 
Upcoming events for teachers will continue to provide valuable experiences to improve 
the quality of education provided to children in the classroom. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

The Memorial School Council developed their School Improvement Plan, which was 
presented to the school committee in June 2000. Topics addressed in the plan included: 
exploring options to ensure an adequate and appropriate space and environment for 
students at Memorial School, strengthening the communication between Memorial 
School staff and parents regarding curriculum, expanding learning opportunities that 
challenge and support children with a wide range of abilities, maintaining an emphasis on 
developing socially competent behaviors within our school community and continuing to 
provide a supportive environment for the parents of our children. 

Our Community School Association (CSA) continues to make significant contributions to 
the school through both financial support and volunteerism. This year their fund raising 
efforts have significantly supported the school through the purchase of replacement 
furniture and additional curriculum materials for classrooms. The CSA purchased 
additional science kits for first grade, a new language arts program for kindergarten, new 
chairs, table and rugs for several classrooms and storage cabinets and bookshelves for the 
learning center. In addition, they added curriculum materials for the Social Competency 
Program and equipment for the music program. 

The CSA also funded a portable science lab program for the kindergarten. Through the 
efforts of Patricia Latimer and Kathleen Caprio the kindergarten children continued to 
benefit from a hands-on approach to learning about scientific inquiry on a regular basis. 
The program was designed to complement existing classroom activities by introducing 
new ideas; reinforcing knowledge and stimulating further investigation in classrooms 
after the science lab left the school. The dedication of these two parents and their 
volunteers has truly enhanced the learning of our young children. 

The CSA has also funded creative enrichment programs for our children. They sponsored 
a paleontologist, Mother Goose, Johnny Appleseed and various performing artists to 
entertain and enrich the school experience for our children. Parent volunteer, Shari 
Dickinson, has spent many hours organizing and arranging these performances. The 
children and staff are most appreciative of these programs which add so much to the 
positive atmosphere of the school. 

Through the award of grants, the Medfield Coalition has also made valuable 
contributions to our school this year. Grants that were funded provided additional 
opportunities for curriculum and program expansion in the areas of math, social studies 
and language arts. All Memorial School students and staff benefit from these awards. 



149 



Several senior citizens from the community continued volunteering at the Memorial 
School this year through Project WISH (Wonderful Individuals Supporting and 
Helping). This program originated at the Ralph Wheelock School has been successful at 
our school as well. Mrs. Margaret Jenkins has contributed many hours to ensure the 
success of this valuable program. The children enjoy the many contributions made by 
their adoptive grandparents. 

FUTURE TRENDS 

The future of the Memorial School itself has been topic for discussion during the past 
year. The community is currently determining whether the school should be renovated to 
better meet the developmental needs of our youngest students. Space constraints and 
inadequate facilities have had an enormous impact on the programs we provide to our 
students. For example, the art room was reclaimed as a classroom when an additional 
section of kindergarten was added this past September. As enrollment increases again 
next year, other programs such as music and health may no longer have their own 
classrooms, but will travel on carts from classroom to classroom. Classrooms are too 
small and many of the building's systems such as heating and ventilation are outdated 
and inadequate. 

Emphasis will continue in our school on developing literacy, math and science concepts 
and providing opportunities for social growth in a responsible manner. Emphasis will 
also continue on the expanding role of technology in the educational process. As an 
early childhood center, the Memorial School will continue to stress teaching children at 
their own level and addressing the varied learning styles that they bring to their 
classrooms. In this way, the potential of each child can truly be met. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Janice Safran 
Principal 




150 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit my Pupil Services Department report for the year ending December 3 1 , 
2000. 



Special Education 

There has been a small increase in the special education student enrollment reflecting the 
overall increase of students in the community. 



Students 


Dec. 1, 1999 


Dec. 1,2000 


ages 3-5 


49 


45 


ages 6-17 


269 


281 


ages 18-21 


11 


8 



329 334 

Most of our children receive their services within our school system as indicated below: 

Special Education Figures Only Dec. 1, 2000 

Grades K-5 130 

Grades 6-8 80 

Grades 9-12 71 

Collaborative Placements 7 

Private Day 7 

Private Residential 4 

The majority of children referred to special education programs have difficulty learning 
to read. To address this need the Department of Pupil Services has provided special 
educators and reading specialists with professional development opportunities in reading 
methodology and instruction. During the 99-2000 school year, eleven special educators 
and reading specialists completed an intensive sixty-hour course in the Wilson Reading 
Program. The knowledge that the teachers acquired through this course will benefit many 
of our children with reading difficulties. 



15 



Preschool Services/Programs 

We continue to operate four, half-day early childhood programs at Memorial School. We 
have 22 four-year-old and 21 three-year-old children who are enrolled in our integrated 
preschool programs. These programs are supported by tuitions and grant funding. 

The Integrated Preschool teachers continue to participate as members of the Charles 
River Community Partnership Council. This year the major focus of the council is to 
support programs in acquiring Accreditation from the National Association for the 
Education of Young Children. We are very pleased to be able to announce that through 
the hard work of the preschool staff, especially the teachers, Ms.Angie Typadis and Ms. 
Debbie Banas, the Preschool received NAEYC Accreditation this December. 



Guidance Services 



At the High School, our counselors continue to use innovative programs and modern 
technology to provide assistance to our students and their parents as well as the high 
school staff and the administration. To better meet the needs and busy schedules of 
parents, evening meetings with seniors and their parents to discuss future plans after high 
school, especially college information were continued. 



Guidance at the Middle School is part of the support system that helps all children 
achieve academic success, healthy self-esteem, sensitivity to the needs of others, and the 
ability to cope with change. Utilizing Group Guidance, individual counseling, and the 
interaction with parents, administrators, staff and other professionals, the guidance 
counselors foster the personal growth of the students, building on their strengths and 
interests. At each grade level a designed Group Guidance curriculum provides for the 
student's engagement with topics that are age appropriate. Guidance updates in the Blake 
Newsletter also provide important information for students and parents on educational 
and social issues. 

Health Services 

Five full time nurses provide services to children in the school system. The nurses are 
both caring and conscientious in providing services and maintaining a healthy school 
environment. 

The diverse role of the school nurse includes: care for children with medical special 
needs, participation at special education team meetings, conducting home visits as 
recommended by the school planning team, education on health issues for students, staff, 






152 



and parents as well as performing state mandated screenings and monitoring state 
requirements such as physical examinations and immunizations. 

We are very pleased to announce that through the diligent efforts of the nurses, Medfield 
is a recipient of the Enhanced School Health Services Grant. This grant will provide 
funding to improve our health service and update our equipment and supplies. An 
additional benefit of the program is the opportunity to network with nurses in many 
school districts during the five years of the grant. 

Postural screening for scoliosis is conducted yearly for grades 5 through 9. The PE 
instructors do the first examination, referring any rechecks and follow up to the nurse. 
Grade 7 students are examined by their health care providers during the year as part of the 
required physical exam. 

Two hundred and forty-two youngsters were screened for kindergarten last year with the 
assistance of school personnel, trained volunteers, the Lions Club and Dr. Stewart 
Galeucia. Additional volunteers assisted our nurses in completing vision and hearing 
screening for 2,503 preschool and school age students. As always, we are very grateful 
for this assistance, without which we would be unable to conduct so many screenings in a 
timely way. 

Personnel 

At the elementary level, Ms. Stacey Borona is the new special educator at Wheelock 
School. At Memorial School, psychologist Liz Donalds joins the special education team 
along with Ms. Julie Riccio and Ms. Heidi Maier, our new speech/language pathologists. 

At the High School, Ms. Gail Williams, special educator, has joined the special education 
team, along with psychologist, Ms. Maryellen Bosh, who now splits her time between the 
Middle and High School. 

At the Middle School, Ms. Sari Turin is our new guidance counselor replacing Michele 
Walker. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen McArdle 
Director of Pupil Services 



153 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my annual report as the athletic director for the Medfield Public 
Schools for the year ending December 31, 2000. 

It is my pleasure to report that for the seventh year in a row over seventy-five percent of 
the student body participated in athletics. This statistic reaffirms the integral part 
athletics play in our school and the education of our children. 

My goal will be to continue to emphasize the tradition of sportsmanship, which has been 
our history here in Medfield. Fair play, competition, goal setting, team work, are just a 
few of the life lessons that athletics can teach. Athletics truly is the other half of 
education. 

We offer 22 varsity interscholastic sports to our students. We added two varsity sports 
this year, boys varsity lacrosse, and swimming. This year we won four Tri Valley League! 
Championships, and 63% of all our contests. This was the best winning percentage in the 
league. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three levels during the past year. The 
following is the entire athletic coaching staff by season: 

WINTER 



Basketball (Boys) 

Basketball (Girls) 

Cheering 
Ice Hockey 

Indoor Track (Boys) 
Indoor Track (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Herb Grace 
Michael Mason 
Michael Douglas 

John Dunn 
Ann M. Sabra 
Blake Sabra 

Georganne Gerlach 

John Panciocco 
John Bannister 
Paul MacDonald 

Nicholas Stevens 
Bemie Shea (Assist.) 
Michael Slason 



154 





SPRING 




Baseball 


Varsity 


Richard Nickerson 
Mark Nickerson 




Junior Varsity 


Martin Salka 




Freshman 


Jon Dunn 


Golf 




George Callahan 


Softball 


Varsity 


Johanna Madge 




Junior Varsity 


Andrea Boni 




Freshman 


Jodi Winner 


Tennis (Boys) 




Vincent Joseph 


Tennis (Girls) 




Ross Irwin 


Tennis 


Junior Varsity Coed 


Blake Sabra 


Track and Field (Boys) 




Michael Kraemer 
Brian Frazier( Assist.) 


Track and Field (Girls) 




Michael Slason 
Bernie Shea (Assist.) 


Volleyball (Boys) 


FALL 


John Hastings 
Jamie Parsons 


Cheering 




Georganne Gerlach 


Cross Country 




Michael Kraemer 
Bernie Shea (Assist.) 


Field Hockey 


Varsity 


Betsy D' Ambrosia 




Junior Varsity 


Dianne Kee 




Freshman 


Colleen Gibbons 


Football 


Varsity 


Vincent Joseph 






Mike Slason (Assist.) 
Brian Frazier (Assist) 



55 



Junior Varsity Nick Stevens 

Freshman Brian O'Connor 



Soccer (Boys) Varsity Tucker Reynolds 

Junior Varsity Phil Stameris 

Soccer (Girls) Varsity Albert Kearney 

Junior Varsity Kristen Supko 

Junior Varsity II Sarah Hobson 

Volleyball (Girls) Varsity John Hastings 

Junior Varsity Glenna Carroll 

Junior Varsity II Sarah Buckley 

All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri-Valley League which consists ol 
Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Millis 
and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fourth in the TVL in total enrollment 
grades nine through twelve. The league is highly competitive in all sports, boys and girls. 
Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state tournament play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 1999-00. The girls basketball team 
had a 19-6 record. The girls qualified for state tournament play for the eleventh year in a 
row. Katie Robinson became the all time scoring leader for girls basketball. Katie was 
also co-mvp in the league. Our boys team finished their season in second place with a 
12-9 record. They qualified for the state tourney for the ninth consecutive year. Girls' 
indoor track was third in the TVL, with a 3-2 record. The girls were third in the Class D 
State Meet, and second in the league relays. Our boys indoor track team was 4-1, and 
was second in the league. The ice hockey teams record was 16-4-2, and won the league 
championship. The hockey team lost in the semi finals of the state tournament. This 
winter marked the first time Medfield High School fielded a Varsity Swimming team 
with Dover-Sherborn. They were very successful as they had a 7-1 record. Kaitlir 
Anelauskas and Amy Bauer were selected as two members of the Globe All Scholastic 
200 meter relay team. Carol Bauer was selected coach of the year in the Boston Globe. 

The spring of 2000 proved to be very exciting. Softball had a 10-8 record, and played ir 
the south sectional semifinals in the state tournament. Boys volleyball had a 6-13 record 
in a rebuilding season. Baseball placed second in the league with a 12-6 record. Oitt 
girls tennis team won the league with a 16-1 mark. This is the third year in a row thai 
they have won the league. We placed six players on the All Star team. The boys tennis 
team qualified for tournament play for the tenth consecutive year and placed second ir 
the TVL. Boys track finished the season at 3-4, and was third in the league. Our girls 
track team finished 6-1, finishing second in the TVL. Chi-Chi Aduba was the Class T 



156 



Champion in the long jump and the triple jump, setting school and league records in both. 
We added boys varsity lacrosse to our athletic program this year. The boys had a 
remarkable 11-5 record good for second place in the league. We also added girls J.V. 
lacrosse and expect to field a varsity girls team and a boys JV team next season. 

Fall 1999 was filled with success for Warrior teams. Girls volleyball was third in the 
TVL with a 12-1 1 mark. The football team finished 1-9. Eric Pellegrin was Homecoming 
MVP. Jordan Calaguire was the MVP of the Thanksgiving day game against Dover- 
Sherborn. Field hockey had a very successful season, and finished with a 9-6-4 mark. 
Boys soccer had another incredible season finishing 14-5-1, and placed second in the 
league. Our girls soccer program had a great season, and finished 12-6-2. The girls 
represented our school in the State South Finals. They finished third in the league. Both 
our boys and girls cross country teams had outstanding seasons, both winning the league, 
with undefeated seasons. Robin Bauer was a Boston Herald All Scholastic. Our golf 
team had a 4-13-1 record for the season. 

Medfield High School's athletic success was rewarded at the end of the school year by 
the news that for the second time our athletic department won the Ernest Dalton Award. 
This trophy is given each year to the school with the best winning percentage in our 
division in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The annual All Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield Boosters, was held in early 
June at the Glen Ellen Country Club in Millis. An audience of over 600 student athletes, 
coaches and parents were treated to a very special evening including the fifth annual 
Thomas Reis Sportsmanship Award which was presented this year to Kate Mawhinney. 
At the banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Kim Zaia and Jack 
Murphy were named the 1999-00 Scholar Athlete recipients. Medfield High School's 
"Wall of Fame" inductees included: Michelle Scecina, Class of 1993, and Meredith 
Dunn, Class of 1995. 

At the June graduation exercises, Rebecca Lahaie, and Geoffrey Harcourt were named 
recipients of the School Boosters Spirit Award. First Team Tri-Valley League All Star 
selections for 1999-2000 are as follows: 



Boys Basketball 



Mike Commane 
Rich Cody 



Girls Basketball 



Jen Picardo 
Lauren Foran 
Kate Robinson 



Ice Hockey 



Connor Lennon 
Joe Gill 
Obi Aduba 



Tom Lanagan 
Matt Brown 
Mike Hartery 



157 



Boys Indoor Track 



Kevin Kriston 
Dennis Rapa 



Jack Murphy 



Girls Indoor Track 



Kate Norberg 
Chi Chi Aduba 
Kristen Moss 
Kim Zaia 



Swimming 



Baseball 



Softball 



Matt Englehardt 
Kaitlin Anelauskas 

Jim McCloud 
J. P. Hernandez 
Jordan Calaguire 

Jen Picardo 
Sara Patch 
Diana Koch 



Amy Bauer 
Lindsey Bauer ! 

Tony Iafolla 
Zach Liber 



Girls Tennis 



Boys Tennis 



Boys Track 



Girls Track 



Boys Volleyball 



58 



Kristen Lepisto 
Heather Lepisto 
Brooke Lepisto 
Ashley Dichino 

Greg Zaia 
Kevin McCabe 
Mike Sabra 

Kyle Bushong 
Kevin Kriston 
Chris Harrington 
Jared Marshall 
Jason Bushong 

Krista Suojanen 
Lauren Maffucci 
Melissa Mormann 

Al Gong 
Chris MacNeil 
Alex Leong 



Jess Grant 
Jess Pittenger 



Dennis Rapa 
Jack Murphy 
Ryan Grillo 
John Benoit 
Obi Aduba 

Kristen Moss 
Kate Norberg 
Chi-ChiAdub; 



Boys Lacrosse 



Wes Kinney 
Andy Pepin 
Colin Schriver 
Brian Vozzella 



Golf 
Cross Country 



Mike Karapetian 

Tyler Leeds Anna Petras 

Kevin Lang Amy Bauer 

Kaitlin Anelauskas Robin Bauer 



Field Hockey 



Boys Soccer 



Tamara Sullivan 
Meenakshi Chirvukula 
Whitney Sheen 



Brett Vollmuth 
Matt Sullivan 



JasonBushong 
Obi Aduba 



Girls Soccer 



Football 



Jess Pittenger 
Diana Kearney 

Jeff Miner 



Kendra Lee 
Jen Lynch 



Volleyball (Girls) 



Anna Youlden 
Krista Soujanen 
Chelle Bento 



Our cheering teams under the guidance of Georganne Gerlach were, as always, talented 
and creative. Our cheerleaders contribute to the athletic program's success by providing 
leadership, support and much enthusiasm to our teams, spectators and community. Year 
after year, their cheering and dance routines are without equal in the Tri- Valley League. 
The annual Homecoming Pep Rally organized by the fall cheering team was once again 
spectacular! Our fifth annual outdoor Thanksgiving game rally was a big success. This 
was followed by our Alumni Touch Football Tournament. 



159 



This concludes my annual report as the Director of Athletics. On behalf of all the 
Warriors, I would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, the Medfield 
School Boosters and the community for all of their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jon Kirby 

Director of Athletics 




160 



REPORT OF THE COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAM 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The Medfield Community Education Program, under the direction of Mr. Richard 
De Young, is comprised of an Adult Education Program, an after-school Intramural 
Program at Blake Middle School and Dale Street School and a Summer Enrichment 
Program. 

The Adult Education Program offers workshops on financial planning as well as courses 
in painting, technology and photography. Sports and wellness activities such as 
basketball for both men and women, and weight training and fitness continue to be very 
popular. An SAT Preparation course is offered in the fall and spring to high school 
students as well as five sessions of Drivers Education. 

The Blake Middle School Intramural Program, under the direction of Mr. Nat Vaughn, 
offers programs to sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students in both the fall and the 
spring. This year's offerings included cross-country, oil painting, homework club and 
golf. 

The Dale Street School Intramural Program, under the direction of Mrs. Teri O'Brien and 
Mrs. Heidi Crable, offers programs to fourth and fifth grade students in both the fall and 
spring. The offerings included rocket making, French and Spanish, basketball, flag 
football and arts and crafts. 

As I conclude my fourth year as the director of Community Education in Medfield, I 
would like to recognize the efforts of Mrs. Teri O'Brien, Mrs. Heidi Crable and Mr. Nat 
Vaughn, the directors of the school programs. Each director has worked very hard to 
insure that quality activities are in place for the students who take part in their programs. 
I continue to look forward to expanding the offerings in our entire program. If there is 
interest in having a course offered in a particular area, or if you know of someone who is 
interested in offering a course through the Adult Education Program, please call me at 
(508)359-1415. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard L. De Young 
Principal 



161 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2000 



Marriages 2000 

JANUARY 

1/4 Khalil Dreik 
Ilham Saliba 

FEBRUARY 

2/1 Paul F. Brooks 

Darin M. Monahan 

2/30 Kevin Jeffrey Foley 
Hope Ellis Drury 

MARCH 

3/18 Richard K. Pease 

Pamela E. Marchildon 

APRIL 

4/20 James H. Connors, Jr. 
Dolores M. Connors 

4/30 Brian M. Cappello 
Joanne Duganiero 

MAY 

5/6 Gary S. Esposito 
Meredith Robinson 

5/6 Craig S. Lockwood 
Kathryn E. Ryan 

5/20 Ronald E. Ken- 
Lorraine I. Gorman 



JULY 

7/8 David M. Lafreniere 
Kathy W. Sprague 

7/8 James J. Malcolm 

Andrea M. Brockelman 



7/8 Patrick F. Gallagher 
Kathleen A. Parrish 

7/8 James F. Crowley 
Susan E. McCarrick 



7/15 Stephen C. Moore 
Wendy C. Corkhum 

7/22 Robert C. Toubeau 
Dawna L. Savage 

7/22 Michael P. Marchessault 
Katherine M. Magyar 

7/22 Robert F. Ravinski 
Kathleen M. Hazlett 

AUGUST 

8/5 Jeffrey M. Darling 
Brenda M. Croke 

8/12 Michael J. Kiessling 
Alma E. Borbon 



JUNE 

6/4 Edward C. Dugan 
Paula A. Jowanna 

6/4 Matthew T. Kerr 

Adrianna R. Sansoucy 

6/24 Andre C. Behrmann 
Elizabeth A. Clarke 



8/19 Charles J. Coffone 
Leslie Ann Pye 

8/26 John B. Scanlon 
Phyllis M. Trabish 

8/31 Charles B. Barnes, Jr. 
Constance I. Thomson 



163 



SEPTEMBER 

9/2 Martin L. Eide 

Leighanne M. Jenkins 

9/8 Wentao Wang 

Kwanjai Chariratanaprak 

9/9 Jon-Paul N. Maddaloni 
Avery W. Macleod 

9/9 Edwin A. Portmann 

Meghan Ann Kennedy 

9/15 David W.Wood 
Shelley R. Ross 

9/23 Paul Andrew Bartony 
Alexis Kosc 

9/30 Justin Leo Enggasser 
Jodi Justina Marino 

OCTOBER 

1 0/7 Daniel Edward Suchan, Jr. 
Kimberly Diane Nelson 

10/14 Timothy Howard Hatch 
Cheryl Ann Geyser 

10/14 Mark R. McVicker 
Beth Anne Sanfield 

10/28 John Allen Bond, Jr. 
Julianne Mae Erickson 

DECEMBER 

1 2/9 Andrew Thomas Clarke 
Kerrie Margaret Mitchell 

12/30 Kevin Jeffrey Foley 
Hope Ellis Drury 



164 



Deaths 


2000 






January 


June 




1/3 


Astrid Linnea Coyne 


6/4 


Doris Elizabeth Scott 


1/3 


Dorothy M. Hoadley 


6/4 


Margaret Mozier 


1/4 


David C. Johnson 


6/5 


Harold William Robie 


1/9 


Maureen Elizabeth O' Toole 


6/15 


John J. MacDonald 


1/14 


Patricia M. Tobin 


6/18 


Wilford A. Rose 


1/17 


Francesca Sabatino 






1/20 


Elizabeth M. Bell 


July 




1/29 


Elinor Roberts 


7/16 


Linda Davis 






7/26 


Suman Sadashiv 


February 


7/30 


Dorothy Ann Kopf 


2/9 


Edna Mae Hinkley 






2/14 


Elvira Ruth Nelson 


August 


2/16 
2/19 


Jean Hanflig 

John Adam Rozmas 


8/29 
8/29 


Guy Joseph Olivieri 
Margaret Louise Baxter 


2/21 


Agnes Evelyn Lord 






2/26 


Leona Avery 


September 


Marcfc 




9/9 


Virginia Kinter 


i 


9/15 


Christopher J. Murphy 


3/9 


Josephine Villari 


9/27 


Phyllis Ann McCormack 


3/12 


Angelina Mary Sapienza 






3/16 


John Anthony Mucciaccio 


October 


April 




10/7 


Mary D. Cummings 




10/9 


Arvids V. Baumanis 


4/7 


Albina Pastuszenski 


10/14 


John Francis Ganley 


4/7 


Richard Joseph Frigon 






4/12 


Clifford Gerald Doucette 


November 


4/13 


Eileen Marie Arsenault 


11/1 


Irma Valena Thompson 


4/20 


Lydia Santangelo 


11/2 


John O. Ekstrom 


4/23 


Kathryn Bolster Stagg 


11/5 


Mary Sara DeVasto 






11/21 


David Paul Kraus 


May 




11/25 


Vincent Michael Cellucci 


5/9 


Evelyn Adele Savage 


11/27 


Ruth Mary Laracy 


5/20 
5/21 


Edythe Mae Gibbs 
Peter A. Deptula 


December 


5/21 


Albert M. Jaques 


12/1 


William Francis Kearns 


5/24 


Robert J. Dalton 


12/6 


Christine Scribner 


5/25 


Arthur Gordon Maguire 


12/9 


Milton Emmanuel Economos 


5/27 


Dorothy Simpson 


12/17 


Mona Fernley Sherman 


5/28 


Donald E. Sassone 


12/20 


Lois J D'Amaro 






12/27 


Virginia Yarlott 






12/28 


Joseph P. Sipas 






12/29 


Paul Joseph Sanwald 



165 



Births 2000 






January 


April 




1/5 


Kyle Parker Heaney 


4/5 


Morgen Kensey Hall 


1/6 


Catherine Elizabeth Bergland 


4/6 


Hannah Elizabeth Price 


1/6 


Abigail Helene Crofts 


4/6 


Devan Bhavani Venkataraman 


1/11 


Charles Thomas Logan 


4/6 


Zoe Garnet Scott 


1/13 


Jessica Carroll Sturchio 


4/9 


Michaela Eleni Anton 


1/17 


Caroline Raffaela Acari 


4/18 


Noah Charles Garfield 


1/21 


Tyler Louis Luczak 


4/19 


Anthony Michael D'Angelo 


1/24 


Anthony Michael Gilchrist 


4/20 


Allison Taylor Carlin 


1/24 


John Erickson Zarker 


4/26 


Ann Marie Kimberly Caine 


1/25 


Mary Katherine O'Donnell 


4/29 


Isabel Johnson 


1/25 


Olivia Mae O'Brien 


4/29 


Nolan Richard Driscoll 


1/26 


Jean Barbara Johnson 


4/30 


Conor Tuohey Pitrus 


1/26 


Christopher Michael Schworer 






1/31 


Corey David Strickler 


May 




T7> _1 




5/5 


Emma Rose Hilvert 


February 


5/9 


Rebecca Calder Brown 


2/1 


Mark Gerard Fitzpatrick 


5/11 


Margaret Alexander Stone 


2/6 


Julia Lorraine McLafferty 


5/11 


Jonathan Lawrence 


2/11 


Ross William Tritcak 


5/17 


Stephen James Athanasiadis 


2/11 


Kaitlin Mary Parks 


5/20 


Eric John Mehra 


2/11 


Caroline Marie Bonde 


5/20 


Geoffrey Stuart Hill 


2/12 


Lauren Anne Tritcak 


5/22 


Greta Claire Smith 


2/15 


Jacob Samuel Yogel 


5/24 


Joseph Cole Nisbet 


2/15 


Camille Rose Phelan 


5/24 


Megan Corey Sullivan 


2/16 


Anthony Martin Tristani, Jr. 


5/30 


Kristen Lee Reardon 


2/17 


John Rycroft Lowell 






2/19 


Jack William Gibbons 


June 




2/21 
2/22 


Risa Bryn MacDonald 
Colin Joseph Canavan 


6/1 
6/5 


Anthony Rocco Devlin 
Rachel Diana Kornet 


2/26 


Athena Claire Papantonis 


6/6 


Christopher Liam Johnson 


\1 « * »•/> V» 


6/12 


Ryan Margaret Ferullo 


iviarcr 




6/14 


Aidan Troy Almeida 


3/1 


Ella Virginia Shreve 


6/15 


Allison Rose Clower 


3/14 


Nishan Michael Avedikian 


6/15 


Kelsey Rose McQuillan 


3/15 


Genna Olympia Katsikaris 


6/16 


Drew Michael Amaral 


3/18 


Margaret Pairn McCarthy 


6/16 


John Thomas O'Connell 


3/23 


Sara Elizabeth Acselrod 


6/17 


Brodie Ladd Rayment 


3/23 


Veronica Marie Frazier 


6/18 


Stephen Dawson O'Leary 


3/23 


Jack Connolly Barrett 


6/19 


Caroline Cawley Difiore 


3/28 


Matthew Richard Cochran 


6/19 


Margaret Marie Scales 


3/30 


Nathan Dean Baker 


6/21 


Perri Ann Cahill 


3/31 


Michael Bryce Marie 


6/22 


Acadia Johanson Gordet 






6/23 


Julia Jean Letai 



166 



6/27 Emma Grace Portanova 

6/29 Peter Hugh Barrette 

6/30 Skylar Emily Flynn 

July 

7/6 Cassandra Rose Navalta 

7/7 Jonathan Lufkin Storrs 

7/7 Danielle Marie Coan 

7/1 1 Thespina Hamos 

II 1 3 Julia Aliya Graham 

7/17 Kate Marie Slowe 

7/19 Joseph Patrick 

7/20 Lauren Anne Sleboda 

7/22 Renee Elizabeth Perry 

7/24 Florentina Toledo Baxter 

7/3 1 Audrey Aileen Sullivan 

August 

8/2 Riley Thomas Kramer 

8/6 Timothy Paul Brooks 

8/10 Sophia Anne Merafeas 

8/16 Paulina Constance Colivas 

8/17 Caroline Joan Phillips 

8/20 Molly Samantha Glasheen 

8/26 Ian Daniel Gipson 

8/29 James Nickolas Pentikis 

8/29 Katelyn Erin Malvese 

September 

9/ 1 4 Daniel Bennett Dealy 

9/20 John Winchester Leonard 

9/22 Christopher Scott 



November 

1 1/2 Henry Healy Bledsoe 

1 1/2 Dana Madison Zapolin 

1 1/6 Anthony George Nicolas 

1 1/7 Jaimee Alyson Hirschfeld 

1 1/9 William Francis Zink 

1 1/9 Domenic Arthur Kovatsi 

1 1/9 Anthony James Kovatsi 

11/11 Irene M.Bates 

11/13 Kathryn Elizabeth Robinson 

1 1/22 Anthony Jared White Tarallo 

1 1/23 Susannah Reese White 

1 1/28 Joseph Anthony McNeeley 



December 

1 2/2 Michael Gerald Chapski 

1 2/7 Robert Allen Raine 

12/12 Zoe Moon Sofferman 

12/14 Hailey Elizabeth Clark 

12/15 Jonah Abraham Kurker 

12/17 Thomas Bain Gill 

12/25 Caroline Elizabeth Shea 

12/26 Sarah Gabrielle Leger 

1 2/27 Abigail Grace Mynahan 

1 2/29 Steven James Crabtree 

1 2/29 James Imbert Kobey 



October 

1 0/2 Griffin Charles Wagner 

10/4 Mairead Kathleen Hoye 

1 0/4 Brian Matthew Schubert 

10/4 Amy Elizabeth Schubert 

1 0/8 Ryan Michael Dooley 

10/12 John Tanner Woolley 

10/14 Carolyn Elizabeth Bergland 

10/14 Abigail Helene Crofts 

10/17 Tyler John Dougherty 

10/18 Bradley William Coughlin 

10/27 Kevin Frederick Viles 



167 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 7, 2000 



Norfolk, SS 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 



GREETINGS: 
In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at 
Precincts 1, 2, 3, 4 at the Memorial School Auditorium, Adams Street, on Tuesday, the 
seventh of March, 2000 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes to the Primary Officers for the election of candidates of political 
parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

DISTRICT MEMBERS OF STATE COMMITTEE (one man and one woman) 
for each Political Party for the Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Senatorial District. 

35 Members of the Democratic Town Committee 

35 Members of the Republican Town Committee 

3 Members of the Libertarian Town Committee 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon , unto the Town 
Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 15th day of 
February in the year Two Thousand 

John T. Harney S\ 

Ann B. Thompson S\ 

Paul Rhuda S\ 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 






168 



by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date of 
the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Kevin W. Robinson S\ 
Date: February 16,2000 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer S\ 
Town Clerk 



169 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 7, 2000 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with the swearing 
in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in 
working order, specimen ballots posted, voting precincts listing displayed and 
instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

ELECTION OFFICERS: Gale Rad, John McGowan, Arm Norton, Priscilla Anderson, 
Joan Bussow, Ruth Chick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Mae Maguire, Emmy Mitchell, Barbara 
Connors, Patricia Rioux, Dorothy Crump, Kathy Lee, Mary Martin, Priscilla Batting, 
Jane Timmerman 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 3,008: 1,91 1 Republicans; 1,097 Democrats; Libertarians. Total 
Registered Voters numbered 7,373, 41% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PRECINCT 
12 3 4 TOTAL 

REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



Alan Keyes 


5 


17 


9 


7 


38 


George W. Bush 


115 


161 


124 


160 


560 


Gary Bauer 








1 





1 


John McCain 


289 


398 


305 


302 


1294 


Steve Forbes 


2 











2 


Orrin Hatch 








1 


1 


2 


No Preference 





2 


2 


1 


5 


Write-In 











1 


1 


Blanks 


3 


1 


1 


3 


8 



1911 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 



William Adams 


37 


64 


29 


53 


183 


Write-in 


3 


6 


2 


8 


19 


Blanks 


444 


479 


406 


380 


1709 



1911 



170 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 



Holly J. Robichaud 


215 


281 


214 


228 


937 


Write-in 


3 


6 


1 


4 


14 


Blanks 


197 


292 


228 


243 


960 



191 



REPUBLICAN TOWN COMMITTEE 



James S. Wakely 


200 


292 


198 


230 


920 


Stephen W. Fosdick 


191 


282 


201 


245 


919 


Gino R. Mariani 


212 


290 


198 


237 


937 


Valerie A. Mariani 


211 


289 


199 


238 


937 


Maybelle Maguire 


204 


310 


205 


247 


966 


William E. Adams 


244 


357 


233 


261 


1095 


Lorraine Paul 





5 








5 


Write-in 


8 


22 


21 


36 


87 


Blanks 


14793 


17782 


12720 


15724 


61019 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



Al Gore 




114 


170 


124 


114 


522 


Lyndon H. LaRouche, 


Jr. 











2 


2 


Bill Bradley 




139 


148 


147 


122 


556 


No Preference 




1 


3 


1 


1 


6 


Write-In 




2 


2 


1 


1 


6 


Blanks 




1 


2 





2 


5 



1097 



STATE COMMITTEE MAN 



William R. Keating 


184 


253 


214 


180 


831 


Write-in 


5 


3 





1 


9 


Blanks 


70 


69 


57 


61 


257 



1097 



STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 



Claire B. Naughton 


178 


242 


202 


172 


794 


Write-In 


4 


2 


1 


1 


8 


Blanks 


77 


82 


70 


66 


295 



1097 



171 



DEMOCRATIC TOWN COMMITTEE 



Sean P. Teehan 


139 


170 


163 


135 


607 


William H. Dunlea 


140 


174 


163 


140 


617 


Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr. 


139 


189 


162 


136 


626 


Cheryl E. Dunlea 


148 


184 


175 


144 


651 


Donald G. Gabor 


132 


162 


147 


127 


568 


Colette T. Kelly 


134 


164 


152 


129 


579 


Robert Luttman 


133 


161 


152 


123 


569 


Paul E. Hinkley 


160 


203 


174 


144 


681 


Eileen F. DeSorgher 


170 


235 


199 


162 


766 


Write-In 


2 


4 


2 


7 


15 


Blanks 


7664 


9732 


8097 


7223 


32716 



LIBERTARIAN BALLOTS 
NO BALLOTS CAST 

Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping, as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: March 9, 2000 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



172 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

TOWN ELECTION 

March 27, 2000 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with the reading 
of the warrant, and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes 
were inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting 
precincts listing displayed 
and instructions to the voter posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

ELECTION OFFICERS: Gale Rad, John McGowan, Eva Grover, Joan Bussow, Mae 
Maguire, Emmy Mitchell, Barbara Connors, Jane Timmerman 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 265. Total registered voters numbered 7,363, 3.6% of the voters 
voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PRECINCT 



TOTAL 



MODERATOR (one year) 
VOTE FOR ONE 



George P. Niles, Jr. 


65 


70 


38 


55 


228 


Write-In 


1 





1 





2 


Blanks 


15 


6 


3 


11 


35 



265 



TOWN CLERK (three years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 



Carol A. Mayer 


70 


69 


39 


51 


229 


Write-In 











2 


2 


Blanks 


11 


7 


3 


13 


34 



265 



SELECTMEN (three years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 



Osier L. Peterson 

Write-In 

Blanks 



68 


66 


37 


60 


231 




2 


1 








3 




11 


9 


5 


6 


31 


265 



173 



ASSESSOR (three years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 



Bruce J. Beardsley 


64 


63 


36 


56 


219 


Write-in 








1 





1 


Blanks 


17 


13 


5 


10 


45 



265 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 

William A. Tosches 

Write-In 

Blanks 22 13 

LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three years) 

VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 



58 


63 


37 


59 


217 


1 








1 


2 


22 


13 


5 


6 


46 



Joanne L. Hooper 


66 


68 


35 


56 


225 


Maura Y. McNicholas 


61 


61 


36 


58 


216 


Write-In 


1 











1 



Blanks 34 23 13 18 88 530 

PLANNING BOARD (five years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 



265 



George N. Lester 

Write-In 

Blanks 


66 

1 
14 


61 



15 


38 


4 


52 

1 

13 


217 

2 

46 


PLANNING BOARD (two years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 
Timothy P. Sullivan 
Write-in 
Blanks 


63 

1 
17 


64 



12 


35 

7 


55 

11 


217 
1 

47 


HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 










Mary E. Rogers 


68 


68 


37 


60 


233 


Write-in 

Blanks 


1 
12 



8 




5 



6 


1 
31 



265 



265 



174 



TRUST FUND COMMISSIONER (three years) 
VOTE FOR ONE 



Georgia Colivas 


4 


1 


1 


5 


11 


Write-in 


6 


3 


5 


4 


18 


Blanks 


71 


72 


36 


57 


236 



265 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping, as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
March 29, 2000 



175 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, to meet at the Memo: 
School, in said Medfield, on Monday the twenty-seventh day of March, A.D., 2000, at 6: 
o'clock A.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 



ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by ballot, viz: 



One Moderator for a term of one year. 

One member of the Planning Board for a term of two years. 

One Town Clerk, one Selectman, one Assessor, one member of the School Committee 

two Library Trustees, and one Trust Fund Commissioner for terms of three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing Authority for terms of 

five years. 



The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 o'clock p.m. 






On Monday, the twenty-fourth day of April, A.D., 2000, commencing at 7:30 p.m. th 
following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in sail 
Medfield, viz: 






ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Towi 
Officers for the past year. 



It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer/Collector to use al 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to that office. 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 

(Treasurer/Collector) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums a ( 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as 
may be necessary for said care, viz. 

John & Elaine Spaulding $ 850 

Thomas & Catherine O'Neill $ 1 ,700 

Barbara Astle $1,700 



176 



Leo & Gay Holderried 


$ 850 


Joyce & Robert Reeves 


$1,700 


Gary & Joan Miner 


$ 400 


Deborah & Daniel Jones 


$ 850 


James & Lillian Imbert 


$1,700 


Gretchen & Douglas Woodruff 


$1,700 


Kris Magnussen 


$ 850 


Catherine & Mark Breen 


$ 850 


Thomas & Gretta Clark 


$1,700 


Albert & Lorrie Manganello 


$1,700 


Peter Scribner 


$ 425 


Veronica Panciocco 


$ 850 


Alan & Dorothy Rother 


$1,700 


Kristin Kingsbury 


$ 425 


Anne & Stanley Minnaert 


$1,700 


Lucy & Gordon Jackson 


$ 425 


TOTAL 


$22,075 



(Cemetery Commission) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/00) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way the following named 
street 

Jade Walk Sta. 0+00.00 to Sta. 9+14.66 

As laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the Order of 
Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including 
drainage easements and pedestrian easements as may be necessary to accomplish such 
purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, 

Section 

53E Vx to provide for a Fire Alarm Revolving fund to be used for fire alarm maintenance, 

equipment or supplies, funds not to exceed $6,500 to come from the Maintenance Fee 

account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in 

relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 



177 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 441 
Section 53 E '/ 2 to provide for an Ambulance Revolving fund to be used for payment 0) 
principal and interest costs on the ambulance, funds not to exceed $45,000 to come from the 
Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said fundsi 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 

It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. Chapter 4^ 

Section 

53E X A to provide for an Advanced Life Support Fund to be used for the payment of 

Advanced Life Support charges, funds not to exceed $30,000 to come from the users of said 

services or their insurers and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or do or 

act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Department) 



It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 






ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of thi 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, Schoo 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation Commissioners, Planninj 
Board, Housing Authority and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act anything in relati 
thereto. 



Officer 

Town Clerk 

Selectmen, Chairman 

Selectmen, Clerk 

Selectmen, Third Member 

Assessors, Chairman 

Assessors, Clerk 

Assessors, Third Member 

Moderator 

Housing Authority 

School Committee 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Park and Recreation Commissioners 

Trust Fund Commissioners 



Present Salary 

$18,102 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

















W.C. Recommends 

$19,007 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

900 

















(Board of Selectmen) 



178 



It was so VOTED (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY 
SCHEDULE, effective July 1, 2000 to read as set forth in the warrant. 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 



POLICE DEPARTMENT (Non-Union personnel) 



Weekly 
Minimum 
Step 6 


Step 2 
Step 7 


Step 3 Step 4 
Maximum 


Step 5 


Animal Control $518.40 
Officer/Inspector $60 1 .20 


$534.80 
$619.20 


$550.00 $566.40 $584.00 
$638.00 


Annually 
Assistant Animal $1515. 
Control Officer $2219. 


$1655. 
$2358. 


$1796. 

$2526. 


$1935. 


$2078. 


MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 


Minimum 




Midpoint 


Maximum 


Town Administrator 


$69,900 




$87,400 


$109,200 


Police Chief 


61,000 




76,300 


95,400 


Superintendent of Public Works 


61,000 




76,300 


95,400 


Fire Chief 


57,000 




71,300 


89,100 


Treasurer/Collector 


49,800 




62,300 


74,700 


Library Director 


57,000 




71,300 


89,100 


Administrative Assistant 


38,000 




47,500 


57,000 


Town Accountant 


43,500 




54,400 


65,300 


Assistant Town Administrator 


43,500 




54,400 


65,300 


Other Salaried Positions 


Minimum 




Midpoint 


Maximum 


Park and Recreation Director 


$38,000 




$47,500 


$57,000 


Detached Social Worker 


31,030 




38,800 


46,500 


Children's Librarian 


31,030 




38,800 


46,500 


Part-time Salaried Positions 










Human Resource 
Representative 


14,500 




18,100 


21,800 


Conservation Agent 


14,500 




18,100 


21,800 



179 



HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 














GR 


MIN 


S2 


S3 


S4 


S5 


S6 


S7 


MAX 


1 


7.50 


7.97 


8.25 


8.51 


8.76 


9.03 


9.29 


9.54 


2 


8.17 


8.41 


8.64 


8.92 


9.17 


9.46 


9.74 


10.02 


3 


8.59 


8.85 


9.11 


9.39 


9.68 


9.95 


10.24 


10.57 


4 


9.04 


9.30 


9.59 


9.86 


10.17 


10.48 


10.79 


11.12 


5 


9.54 


9.84 


10.14 


10.44 


10.76 


11.06 


11.40 


11.67 


6 


10.02 


10.30 


10.60 


10.92 


11.25 


11.59 


11.94 


12.31 


7 


10.57 


10.78 


11.22 


11.56 


11.91 


12.26 


12.63 


12.96 


8 


11.13 


11.44 


11.79 


12.15 


12.51 


12.89 


13.28 


13.68 


9 


11.67 


12.02 


12.38 


12.75 


13.13 


13.53 


13.95 


14.38 


10 


12.31 


12.68 


13.05 


13.44 


13.84 


14.28 


14.71 


15.15 


11 


12.96 


13.37 


13.75 


14.16 


14.60 


15.03 


15.48 


15.95 


12 


13.62 


14.02 


14.44 


14.89 


15.34 


15.80 


16.27 


16.76 


13 


14.38 


14.82 


15.26 


15.74 


16.21 


16.70 


17.20 


17.71 


14 


15.11 


15.56 


16.04 


16.52 


17.02 


17.53 


18.05 


18.59 


15 


15.95 


16.45 


16.95 


17.46 


17.98 


18.52 


19.08 


19.65 


16 


16.75 


17.26 


17.77 


18.30 


18.85 


19.42 


20.00 


20.60 


17 


17.63 


18.17 


18.72 


19.28 


19.85 


20.45 


21.06 


21.70 


18 


18.56 


19.12 


19.70 


20.29 


20.90 


21.53 


22.17 


22.84 


19 


19.49 


20.08 


20.68 


21.30 


21.94 


22.60 


23.28 


23.97 


20 


20.46 


21.08 


21.71 


22.36 


23.03 


23.72 


24.43 


25.17 


21 


21.48 


22.13 


22.79 


23.47 


24.18 


24.90 


25.65 


26.42 


22 


22.55 


23.24 


23.94 


24.66 


25.40 


26.16 


26.95 


27.75 


Minimum wage $6.00 


per hour. Lower rates 


as authorized by the Commonwealth c 



Massachusetts may also be paid 



80 



HOURLY GRADE LISTING 



Grade 1 

Page 

Grade 2 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 3 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 4 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 5 
Mini-bus Driver 

Grade 6 

Clerk Typist 

Grade 7 

Skilled Laborer 

Grade 8 

Library Assistant 

Grade 9 

Secretary 

Sr. Library Assistant 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Matron 
Traffic Supervisor 

Grade 10 

Collector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 

Grade 11 

Truck driver 



Grade 13 

Light Equipment Operator 

Grade 14 

Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Wastewater Treatment Operator 
Administrative Secretary 
Council on Aging Director 
Groundskeeper 

Grade 15 

Reference Librarian 

Finance Data Processing Supervisor 

Grade 16 

Sr. Heavy Equipment Operator 

Sr. Administrative Secretary 

Sr. Groundskeeper 

Tree Warden 

Insect Pest Control 

Call Firefighter 

Firefighter EMT 

Grade 17 

Asst. Wastewater Treatment 
Operator in Charge 
Sr. Equipment Operator/Repairman 
Sr. Water Operator/Repairman 

Grade 18 

Presently No Positions 

Grade 19 

Wastewater Treatment Operator in 

Charge 

Street /Water/Sewer Foreman 



Grade 12 

Outreach Worker (COA) 
Custodian 



Grade 20 

Sr. Foreman 

Sr. Wastewater Treatment Operator 

in Charge 



81 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS- PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Veterans Agent 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Registrar, Clerk 

Registrar 



Annually 

$5,492 

1,870 

1,083 

442 



Police Intern 



Weekly 
$320 - $435 



Police- Private Special Detail 
Ambulance EMT 
Tree Climber 
Library Page 



Hourly 
$23.40 
$18.56 
$15.32 
$7.50-$9.84 



FIRE 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 



Annually 

$2,820 

1,692 

1,353 

586 

586 



INSPECTORS 



$21 .90 per inspection 



Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 
Street Inspector 



Annual Minimum 

4,235 

568 

1,167 

214 

3,460 

793 

1,926 

568 

21.90 per inspection 

11.52 per hour 



182 



PARK AND RECREATION 
Program Director 

Swim Pond Director 

Swim Pond Assistant Director 

Swim Team Coach/Guard 

Assistant Coach/Guard 

Water Safety Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Swim Pond Badge Checker 

Swim Pond Maintenance 

Swim Pond Set-up Workers 

Camp Director 

Camp Specialists 

Counselors 

Jr. Counselor 

Tennis Director 

Tennis Instructor 

Trainee 

Or do or act anything in relation there to 



Annually 
$11,151 to 13,293 

4,646 to 6,381 

3,098 to 4,254 

2,581 to 3,722 

1,652 to 2,872 

1,962 to 2,872 

1,859 to 2,658 

620 to 957 

723 to 957 

516 to 2,127 

2,065 to 4,254 

1,033 to 3,191 

826 to 2,127 

207 to 639 

3,098 to 4,254 

620 to 1,064 

(hourly) 6.00 per hour 



(Personnel Board) 



VOTED: That the Personnel Administration Plan and Classification of Positions and 
Pay schedule be approved effective July 1 , 2000 to read as set forth in the warrant, with 
the following changes to the CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS: (4/24/2000) 
Add the following Position Classifications: 

GRADE 16 

Senior Water Technician 

Senior Wastewater Treatment Operator 

Ambulance EMT 

GRADE 17 

Assistant Water Operator in Charge 

And delete the following Position Classification: 
GRADE 17 

Senior Water Operator Repairman 
SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS-PART TIME/TEMPORARY 

Ambulance EMT 

And with the following addition to the PAY SCHEDULE: 



183 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
FIVE STEP PLAN Weekly 





Minimum 


Step 2 


Step 3 


Step 4 


Step 5 


Senior Dispatcher 


$527.16 


$553.98 


$585.17 


$591.59 


$649.30 


Dispatcher 


$474.56 


$501.86 


$527.16 


$553.99 


$585.25 


EIGHT STEP PLAN 












Weekly 












Minimum 


Step 2 


Step 3 


Step 4 


Step 5 




Step 6 


Step 7 


Step 8 






Senior Dispatcher 


$527.16 


$543.04 


$553.20 


$575.82 


$593.19 




$611.07 


$629.43 


$649.30 






Dispatcher 


$474.56 


$488.94 


$503.33 


$518.73 


$534.12 




$544.67 


$566.62 


$585.24 







ARTICLE 11.. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town 
Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town 
for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 2000, or such other sums as the Town may 
determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate $28,940,468 to defray the operating expenses of the various 
Town Boards, Committees, Commissions and Departments as printed in the Warrant 
Report and/or as amended by this Town Meeting for the fiscal year commencing July 1 , 
2000 and that to meet said appropriation the following sums be raised and appropriated 
on the fiscal 2001 tax levy or transferred from accounts or funds as follows: 

$27,305,502 - Tax Levy 

39,000 - Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest Account 
1 1 ,260 - Park & Recreation Revolving Account 
901,924 - Water Enterprise Fund 
682,782 - Sewer Enterprise Fund 

BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 



ARTICLE 12. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from the 
Fiscal 2000 Tax levy and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow for Capital 
Expenditures including the following: 



DEPARTMENT PROJECT TITLE 

Town Clerk Voting Booths 

184 






Fire 
Police 

Park & Recreation 
Highway 

Reconstruction 

Sweeper 



School 



Memorial 



Wheelock 



Dale Street 
Blake Middle 
System-wide maintenance 



Town Hall 



Protective Clothing Replacement 
Fire Chief Command Vehicle 

Upgrade Jail Cells 
Cruiser Replacement (2) 
Radio System 

Metacomet Park Improvements 

Resurface Subdivisions 
Pickup Truck Replacement 
South St. Sidewalks & Road 

Transfer Station Tractor Replacement 
Combination Sidewalk Plow, Blower & 

Sander Unit with Wet System 
Chipper 



Boiler Replacement 
Asbestos Abatement 
Design & Clerk of Works 
Fire Alarm/Smoke Detectors 
Replace Chairlift/ Accessibility 
Modular Building 
Restroom Renovation 
Pickup Truck with Plow 

File Server 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee and/or the Park & 
Recreation Commission be further authorized to contract with and otherwise deal with 
any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital expenditure; 
and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be authorized to lease for 
a term not exceeding five years or borrow in accordance with the provision of Paragraph 



185 



9 and/or 14 of Chapter 44 of the General Laws; and to trade or sell toward part of the 
purchase price the following: 

DEPARTMENT TRADE-IN OR SELL 

Public Works 1983 sander 

1986 Badger chipper 
Police 1 994 Ford Crown Victoria Cruiser 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



1995 Ford Crown Victoria Cruiser 



(Capital Budget Committee) 



VOTED: To appropriate the sum of $1,001,873 for capital expenditures, as set out 
below, and that to meet this appropriation the following sums be raised on the Fiscal 
200 1 tax levy and/or transferred from available funds and that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to trade or sell toward part of the purchase price one 1983 sander, one 1986 
Badger chipper, one 1994 Ford Crown Victoria Cruiser and one 1995 Ford Crown 
Victoria Cruiser and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee and/or 
the Park and Recreation Commission be authorized to contract with and otherwise deal 
with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of any capital 
expenditure; and that the School Committee be authorized to lease for a term not 
exceeding five years or borrow in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 or Chapter 645 of the Acts of 1948 as amended. 
BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 



$450,000 - Tax Levy 

$400,000 - Chapter 90 Highway Funds 

Unexpended Appropriation Balances 
$29,000 - Memorial School Roof Replacement 
$100,000 - FY'OO Solid Waste Tipping Fees 
$10,000 - Town Hall GIS System 
$1,584- School Energy Conservation 

$3 1 - School Playground Renovation 
$8,042 - Memorial School Restrooms 

$328 - Highway Loader 
$1,840- Noon Hill Road Design 
$1,048 - FY'OO Police Cruiser Replacement 



$1,001,873 



86 



DEPARTMENT 
Town Clerk 
Town Hall 
Police 



Fire 



Public Works 



PROJECT AMOUNT 

Voting Booths $ 5,894 

File Server 10,000 

Upgrade Jail Cells -0- 

Replace Two Cruisers 5 1 ,000 

Replace Radio System 1 65,859 

Protective Clothing Replacement 5,600 

Replace Fire Chiefs Command Car 36,000 

Resurface Subdivisions 40,000 

South St. Sidewalk & Road Reconst. 400,000 

Replace Pickup Truck -0- 

Replace Transfer Station Tractor 1 00,000 

Sidewalk Plow, Blower & Sweeper -0- 

Sander with Wet system -0- 

Chipper 32,000 



Park & Recreation 


Metacomet Park Improvements 


32,001 


Schools 






Memorial 


Replace Boiler 


-0- 




Asbestos Abatement 


-0- 




Design & Clerk of the Works 


-0- 


Wheelock 


Fire Alarms/Smoke Detectors 


-0- 




Replace ChairlifV Accessibility 


-0- 


Dale Street 


Modular Classrooms 


94,520 


Black Middle 


Restroom Renovation 


-0- 


System -wide Maintenance 


Pickup Truck with Plow 


29,000 




TOTALS 


$1,001,873 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the fyOO 
School Department budget for the purpose of providing additional funding for special 
education and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 

VOTED: To Dismiss this Article (consent calendar 4/24/2000) 



187 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of providing for 
larvicide application, said funds to be expended under the direction of the Board of 
Health, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Health) 

VOTED: To appropriate $15,000; said sum to be raised on the fiscal 2001 tax levy for 
the purpose of providing for mosquito larvicide application, said funds to be expended 
under the direction of the Board of Health. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of conducting a 
hazardous waste collection, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate $4,000; said sum to be raised for the purpose of conducting a 
hazardous waste collection. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote a sum of money and determine in what 
manner said sum shall be raised to provide for the purchase and erection of signs at the 
entrances to Medfield in conjunction with the 350 th celebration of the Town's settlement 
and incorporation, determine how said funds shall be raised and authorize the 350 th 
Anniversary Committee to expend said funds and to enter into contracts with state, 
federal and/or private agencies to accomplish this, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate $18,000; said sum to be raised on the fiscal 2001 tax levy to 
provide for the purchase and erection of signs at the entrances to Medfield in 
conjunction with the 350 th celebration of the Town's settlement and incorporation, and 
that the 350 th Anniversary Committee be authorized to expend said funds and to enter 
into contracts with state and/or federal governments and private contractors and 
suppliers to accomplish this. 
BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purposes of completing the 
project at Baxter Park including purchasing and installing an irrigation system, 
monument completion and landscaping in conjunction with the construction of the 
Veteran's Memorials, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Committee to Study Memorials) 

VOTED: To appropriate $19,000; said sum to be raised on the 2001 tax levy for the 
purposes of completing the project at Baxter Park including purchasing and installing an 



188 



irrigation system, monument completion and landscaping in conjunction with the 
construction of the Veteran's Memorials. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised to complete the construction of fields 
and related landscaping, electrical and security access gates at McCarthy Park, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTED: To appropriate $72,000; said sum to be raised on the fiscal 2001 tax levy and 
expended under the jurisdiction of the Superintendent of Public Works to complete the 
construction of fields and related landscaping, electrical and security access gates at 
McCarthy Park. 
BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and 
determine in what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of providing funds for 
the maintenance of following town-owned lands: Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park, 
Meetinghouse Park, Town Hall Library, Fire Station, Police Station and Dale St. tennis 
court, McCarthy Park, Baxter Park, and the Pfaff Center; said funds to be expended 
under the jurisdiction of the Park and Recreation Commission, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Buildings & Grounds Committee & Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate $75,000; said sum to be raised on the 2001 tax levy for the 

purpose of providing funds for the maintenance of following town-owned lands: 

Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park, Meetinghouse Park, Town Hall Library, Fire Station, 

Police Station and Dale St. tennis court, McCarthy Park, Baxter Park, and the Pfaff 

Center; said funds to be expended under the jurisdiction of the Park and Recreation 

Commission. 

BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to transfer responsibility for the 
maintenance of the Vine Lake Cemetery from the Cemetery Commission to the 
Superintendent of Public Works and authorize the Superintendent of Public Works to 
expend funds appropriated by the Town for the maintenance of Vine Lake Cemetery, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Building & Grounds Committee & Board of Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED (4/24/2000) 



189 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $158.66 to pay an 
unpaid bill of the Police Department from fy99 in accordance with the provisions of 
G.L. Chapter 44, Section 64 and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Police Chief) 

VOTED: To appropriate $158.66 to pay an unpaid bill of the Police Department from 
ry99 in accordance with the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 64 said sum to be 
raised on the fiscal 2001 tax levy. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 5K, 
Chapter 59 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which 
authorizes the Board of Selectmen to establish a program to allow persons over 60 to 
volunteer to provide services to the Town in exchange for which the Town shall reduce 
the real property tax obligation of such person in an amount to not to exceed $500 in a 
given tax year, and to carry out this program the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws 
by adding a new SECTION 6 , to ARTICLE VIII - COUNCIL ON AGING, to read as 
follows: 

SECTION 6. The Board of Selectmen shall designate the Council on Aging to 
administer a Senior Tax Work-Off Program in accordance with the provisions Section 
5K, Chapter 59 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 
accordance with the following local rules and procedures: 

A. The hourly rate at which the volunteer services are to be credited shall be the 
minimum wage of the Commonwealth in effect at the time the services are 
provided. 

B. The maximum amount by which the real property tax obligation of any one 
volunteer may be reduced in any given tax year shall not exceed $500 , or 
such other maximum amount as may from time to time be established by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C. A volunteer must have reached 60 years of age by the July 1 of the fiscal tax 
year for which the tax credit is given. 

D. There shall be no income eligibility for participation in the program. 

E. Tax credits may be applied only towards real property, which the volunteer 
occupies as a principal residence and has property tax liability. 

F. Elected officials serving on any Town board, committee or commission or 
individuals who are or were compensated, full-time employees of the Town 
during the fiscal year for which the tax credit is sought shall be ineligible to 
participate in the program. 

G. The Board of Selectmen in consultation with the Council on Aging shall 
determine annually the maximum number of residents who may participate in 
the program and shall advise the Board of Assessors of this number prior to 
the start of the fiscal year for which tax credits are to be given. 

H. The Council on Aging shall have the sole discretion to review and approve 
volunteer services to be included in the program and to place and/or assign 



190 



eligible residents to perform such services. To assist them in making these 
decisions the Council on Aging may solicit requests for volunteer services 
from the various Town departments. 

I. The Council on Aging will certify the amount of volunteer services 

performed by each participating taxpayer to the Medfield Board of Assessors 
on or before December 1 of the year for which tax credits are to be given. 
Upon timely receipt of this certification, the Board of Assessors shall credit 
the real property tax obligations of the participating taxpayers in an amount 
not to exceed $500 per taxpayer, or such other maximum amount as may 
from time to time be established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A 
copy of each taxpayer's certification will be given to that taxpayer. This 
credit shall be in addition to any exemption or abatement for which the 
volunteer may otherwise be eligible. 

J. All of these procedures shall be carried out in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 5K, Chapter 59 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, as they may from time to time be amended. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen & Council on Aging) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Article 22 by deleting paragraph F of Section 6 and inserting 
in place thereof: 

F. During the fiscal year for which the tax credit is sought, elected officials 
who receive compensation for their services on any Town Board, 
Committee 

or Commission and full or part-time employees of the Town shall be 
ineligible 
to participate in the program. 

It was so VOTED 4/24/2000 

VOTED: That Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 5K, Chapter 59 of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, which authorizes the Board 
of Selectmen to establish a program to allow persons over 60 to volunteer to provide 
services to the Town in exchange for which the Town shall reduce the real property tax 
obligation of such person in an amount to not to exceed $500 in a given tax year, and to 
carry out this program the Town will vote to amend its By-Laws by adding a new 
SECTION 6 , to ARTICLE VIII - COUNCIL ON AGING, to read as follows: 

SECTION 6. The Board of Selectmen shall designate the Council on Aging to 
administer a Senior Tax Work-Off Program in accordance with the provisions Section 
5K, Chapter 59 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 
accordance with the following local rules and procedures: 



191 



A. The hourly rate at which the volunteer services are to be credited shall be the 
minimum wage of the Commonwealth in effect at the time the services are 
provided. 

B. The maximum amount by which the real property tax obligation of any one 
volunteer may be reduced in any given tax year shall not exceed $500 , or 
such other maximum amount as may from time to time be established by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

C. A volunteer must have reached 60 years of age by the July 1 of the fiscal tax 
year for which the tax credit is given. 

D. There shall be no income eligibility for participation in the program. 

E. Tax credits may be applied only towards real property, which the volunteer 
occupies as a principal residence and has property tax liability. 

F. During the fiscal year for which the tax credit is sought, elected officials who 
receive compensation for their services on any Town Board, Committee or 
Commission and 

full or part-time employees of the Town shall be ineligible to participate in 
the program. 

G. The Board of Selectmen in consultation with the Council on Aging shall 
determine annually the maximum number of residents who may participate in 
the program and shall advise the Board of Assessors of this number prior to 
the start of the fiscal year for which tax credits are to be given. 

H. The Council on Aging shall have the sole discretion to review and approve 
volunteer services to be included in the program and to place and/or assign 
eligible residents to perform such services. To assist them in making these 
decisions the Council on Aging may solicit requests for volunteer services 
from the various Town departments. 

I. The Council on Aging will certify the amount of volunteer services 
performed by each participating taxpayer to the Medfield Board of Assessors 
on or before December of the year for which tax credits are to be given. 
Upon timely receipt of this certification, the Board of Assessors shall credit 
the real property tax obligations of the participating taxpayers in the amount 
not to exceed $500 per taxpayer, or such other maximum amount as may 
from time to time be established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A 
copy of each taxpayer's certification will be given to that taxpayer. This 
credit shall be in addition to any exemption or abatement for which the 
volunteer may otherwise be eligible. 

J. All of these procedures shall be carried out in accordance with the provisions 
of Section 5K, Chapter 59 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, as they may from time to time be amended. 

(4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 23.. To see if the Town will vote to amend SECTION 13, SIGN BYLAW , 
of the Town of Medfield, Massachusetts Zoning Bylaw, by deleting section 13.3.1 and 
substituting in place thereof a new subsection 13.3.1 to read as follows: 



192 



13.3.1 Off-premise signs are prohibited, except 

a. temporary signs used to advertise special events whose proceeds are 
used for charity, schools or nonprofit organizations, provided an 
approved sign permit is obtained at least three (3) days before the 
posting of the sign. There shall be no fee for the permit and the 
Building Inspector is authorized to issue the permit without the Sign 
Advisory Board's approval. 

b. businesses located on Park Street may erect and maintain one free 
standing sign which identifies all such businesses and otherwise meets 
the requirements of the Town's bylaw on private land at the 
intersection of Park Street and Main Street. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTED: That this Article be withdrawn without prejudice. BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

(4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Historical Commission to 
apply for and receive grants from the Massachusetts Historical Commission under the 
Historic Landscape Preservation Grant Program and to authorize the Commission to 
enter into contracts with federal, state and or private agencies to carry out the purposes 
of this program, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historical Commission) 

It was so VOTED - BY MORE THAN 2/3 (4/24/2000) 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Historic 
Districts Bylaw to add an Historic District to Section 3, Historic District Boundaries as 
follows: 

Town Center Historic District 

The boundaries are hereby established as shown on the official Historic Map filed with 
the Massachusetts Historical Commission on January 13, 2000, and also filed with the 
Town Clerk, which map accompanies and is hereby declared to be a part of this bylaw, 
or do or act anything thereto. 

(Historic District Commission) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Move that the Town amend the Town of Medfield Historic 
Districts Bylaw (Article XIV) by adding to Section 3, Historic District Boundaries a new 
subsection as follows: 



193 



Town Center Historic District 

And by amending the Town's Official Historic Districts Map to add said district with the 
boundaries shown on the map filed with the Massachusetts Historical Commission on 
January 13, 2000, a copy of which is printed in the Warrant Report, but excluding there 
from parcels # 10, 12, 14, 16, 17 and 19 shown on said map, said map as further 
amended to be filed with the Town Clerk, and recorded in Norfolk Registry of Deeds as 
required by General Laws, Chapter 40C, Section 3. 

It was so VOTED 4/24/2000 BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

VOTED: That the Town amend the Town of Medfield Historic Districts Bylaw 

(Article XIV) by adding to Section 3, Historic District Boundaries a new subsection as 

follows: 

Town Center Historic District 

And by amending the Town's Official Historic Districts Map to add said district with the 
boundaries shown on the map filed with the Massachusetts Historical Commission on 
January 13, 2000, a copy of which is printed in the Warrant Report, but excluding there 
from parcels # 10, 12, 14, 16, 17 and 19 shown on said map, said map as further 
amended to be filed with the Town Clerk, and recorded in Norfolk Registry of Deeds as 
required by General Laws, Chapter 40C, Section 3. 

It was so VOTED 4/24/2000 BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
appoint a Committee with representation to include but not be limited to the 
Conservation Commission, the Board of Health, the Water and Sewerage Board, the 
Planning Board and the Superintendent of Public Works to investigate existing and 
proposed regulations regarding storm water management, said Committee to report back 
to the Town Meeting with recommendations for coordinating storm water management 
policy in the Town and to appropriate a sum of money and determine in what manner 
said sum shall be raised for the purpose of employing consultants or conducting surveys 
and to authorize said committee to apply for and receive grants and to enter into 
contracts with state, federal, or private parties to carry out the purpose of this article, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Water and Sewerage Board) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to appoint a Committee with 
representation to include by not be limited to the Conservation Commission, the Board 
of Health, the Water and Sewerage Board, the Planning Board and the Superintendent of 
Public Works to investigate existing the proposed regulations regarding storm water 
management, said Committee to report back to the Town Meeting with 
recommendations for coordinating storm water management policy in the Town and 
appropriate $15,000 said sum to be transferred from 



194 



the unexpended balance of Article 34 of the 1 997 Annual Town Meeting (study of 

wastewater management alternatives), for the purpose of employing consultants or 

conducting surveys and authorize said committee to apply for and receive grants and to 

enter into contracts with state, federal, or private parties to carry out the purpose of this 

article. 

BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield By-laws, 
by adding to Article 4, Police Regulations a new section as follows: 

Section 31. Any violation of the Town of Medfield Transfer Station Regulations 
in any one calendar year shall be punishable by a fine as follows: 

First offense: $ 25 

Second offense: $ 50 

Third and subsequent offense : $ 1 00 

This provision may be enforced by any officer of the Medfield Police Department or by 
the Superintendent of Public Works or his designees, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Solid Waste Study Committee & Board of 
Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED 4/24/2000 BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into 
ground lease with the Greater Boston YMC A of ten acres, more or less, being a portion 
of a parcel of Town-owned land off West Mill Street, identified on the Board of 
Assessor's maps as map 63, lot 10; map 56, lots 43, 44 and 45, title reference: Norfolk 
Registry of Deeds, Book 11040, Page 253 for a period not to exceed ninety-nine years 
for the purpose of providing a site for a private non-profit recreational facility on such 
terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen deem to be in the best interest of the 
Town of Medfield; and, if deemed necessary or desirable, to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enact 
special legislation authorizing the Town of Medfield to enter into such a lease, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Economic Development Committee & Board of 
Selectmen) 

It was so VOTED BY UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 



195 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the town will authorize the Board of Assessors to use a sum of 
money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2001, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Assessors to use $687,385 from Free 
Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for fiscal 2001. BY 
UNANIMOUS VOTE (4/24/2000) 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, into the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given under our hands this 14th 
day of March, Two Thousand. 



John T. Harney, Chairman S\ 
Ann B. Thompson S\ 
Paul B. Rhuda S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date of 
the meeting as within directed. 

Constable of Medfield: Daniel J. McCarthy S\ 
Date: March 20, 2000 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



196 



Springfield Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to the General By-Laws adopted under Articles 22, 25, and 
27 of the warrant for the Annual Town Meeting that convened on April 24, 2000, have 
been approved by the Attorney General's Office. 



THOMAS F. REILLY 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 

By: Kelli E. Lawrence S\ 
Assistant Attorney General 
August 7, 2000 



197 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

STATE PRIMARY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2000 

SS. Norfolk 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to vote at Precinct 1, 2, 3, 
4. at Memorial School on TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 
2000, from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following offices: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

REPRESENTATIVE IN Ninth CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR Second DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN THE GENERAL NORFOLK, BRISTOL & 

COURT PLYMOUTH DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE Thirteenth NORFOLK 

GENERAL COURT DISTRICT 

CLERK OF COURTS NORFOLK COUNTY 

REGISTER OF DEEDS NORFOLK DISTRICT 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS NORFOLK COUNTY 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and 
place of said voting. Given under our hands this 8th day of August, 2000. 



Ann Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



198 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen days before the date 
of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Raymond Wheeler, Sgt S\ 
Date: August 9, 2000 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



199 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE PRIMARY 
SEPTEMBER 19, 2000 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Gale Rad, John McGowan, Priscilla Anderson, Ruth Chick, Betsy Dakin, 
Patricia Iafolla, Mae Maguire, Barbara Connors, Dorothy Crump, Anne Ciancarelli, 
Priscilla Batting, Barbara Reynolds, Irene O'Toole, Jane Timmerman and Angelo 
Allegretto 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 391 . There are 7,516 registered voters, 5% of voters voting. 
After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PRECINCT 
12 3 4 TOTAL 

DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS (VOTE 












FOR ONE) 












Edward M. Kennedy 


58 


71 


49 


42 


220 


All Others 


3 


1 





1 


5 


Blanks 


13 


10 


9 


5 


37 
262 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 












(VOTE FOR ONE) 












John Joseph Moakley 


60 


69 


51 


40 


220 


All Others 





1 


1 





2 


Blanks 


14 


12 


6 


8 


40 
262 


COUNCILLOR (VOTE FOR ONE) 












Kelly A. Timilty 


34 


41 


31 


25 


131 


Terence J. O'Malley 


28 


30 


18 


18 


94 


All Others 

















Blanks 


12 


11 


9 


5 


37 
262 



200 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
(VOTE FOR ONE) 



James Timilty 
All Others 
Blanks 



54 


60 


40 


33 


187 





1 








1 


20 


21 


18 


15 


74 
262 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
(VOTE FOR ONE) 



Lida E. Harkins ( P 1 & 4) 


62 






37 


99 


John H. Rogers (P 2 & 3) 




70 


45 




115 


All Others 





1 








1 


Blanks 


12 


11 


13 


11 


47 
262 



CLERK OF COURTS (VOTE FOR ONE) 



Walter F. Timilty, Jr. 


47 


58 


40 


32 


177 


All Others 





1 








1 


Blanks 


27 


12 


18 


16 


84 
262 



REGISTER OF DEEDS (VOTE FOR ONE) 

Peter H. Collins 
Mary Ellen Cronin 
Paul D. Harold 
All Others 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (VOTE FOR 
NOT MORE THAN TWO) 



24 


25 


14 


16 


79 


22 


19 


20 


15 


76 


18 


35 


20 


16 


89 

















10 


3 


4 


1 


18 



262 



John M. Gillis 


26 


38 


22 


20 


106 


William P. O'Donnell 


44 


54 


44 


35 


177 


All Others 

















Blanks 


78 


72 


50 


41 


241 

524 



201 



REPUBLICAN BALLOT 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS (VOTE FOR 
ONE) 



JackE. Robinson, III 19 
All Others 2 
Blanks 5 


20 

5 
15 


20 



10 


21 
1 
7 


80 

8 

37 

125 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (VOTE 
FOR ONE) 










Janet E. Jeghelian 23 
All Others 
Blanks 3 


31 

9 


29 

1 


28 

1 


111 



14 

125 


COUNCILLOR (VOTE FOR ONE) 










Write In 2 
Blanks 24 


2 
38 


1 
29 


1 
28 


6 
119 

125 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (VOTE 
FOR ONE) 










Jo Ann Sprague 22 
All Others 1 
Blanks 3 


33 
1 
6 


27 

3 


29 




111 

2 

12 



125 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
(VOTE FOR ONE) 



SeanE. Rickert(Pl & 4) 
All Others (P2 & 3) 
Blanks 



CLERK OF COURTS (VOTE FOR ONE) 



Daniel M. Dewey 
All Others 
Blanks 



4 






25 


49 




2 


1 




3 


2 


38 


29 


4 


73 
125 


4 


29 


26 


26 


105 

















2 


11 


4 


3 


20 

125 



202 



REGISTER OF DEEDS (VOTE FOR ONE) 

Bruce Olsen 
All Others 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (VOTE FOR NOT 
MORE THAN TWO) 



4 


29 


26 


26 


105 

















2 


11 


4 


3 


20 
125 



Write In 1 





1 


2 


4 


Blanks 51 


80 


59 


56 


246 
250 


LIBERTARIAN BALLOT 










SENATOR IN CONGRESS (VOTE FOR ONE) 










Carla A. Howell 3 








1 


4 


Write In 














Blanks 












4 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
September 21,2000 



203 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WARRANT FOR SEPTEMBER 25, 2000 SPECIAL TOWN 

MEETING 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School gymnasium, in said Medfield, on Monday the 
twenty-fifth day of September, A.D., 2000, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there to act 
on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money to the Police 
Operations-Salaries account 01-210-2-1 and to the Police Operations-Operations account 
01-210-2-2 as requested by the Selectmen and the Chief of Police to fund the fy2000 
portion of the mediated collective bargaining agreement between the Town of Medfield 
and the Medfield Police League and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the town appropriate $60,048 to provide additional funding to the Police 
Operations-Salaries account 01-210-2-1 as requested by the Selectmen and the Chief of 
Police to fund the fy2001 portion of the mediated collective bargaining agreement 
between the Town of Medfield and the Medfield Police League, said sum to be raised on 
the 2001 tax levy. 
(9/25/00) BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, all or a portion of the following 
parcels of land identified on the Town of Medfield Board of Assessor's maps as map 64, 
lots 1 and 86 (Norfolk County Registry of Deeds plan 1526 of 1954, Plan Book 192) for 
municipal purposes, to appropriate a sum of money for such purpose, to determine in 
what manner said sum shall be raised, to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of 
Paragraph(2) and/or ( 3), Section 7, Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into 
contracts with and to receive money from the state and/or federal government; and that 
all appropriations authorized under this article be contingent upon approval of a, so- 
called, proposition 2 1/2 debt exclusion in accordance with Chapter 59, Section 21C of 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



204 



VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, 
eminent domain or otherwise, all or a portion of the following parcels of land identified 
on the Town of Medfield Board of Assessor's maps as map 64, lots 1 and 86 (Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds plan 1526 of 1954, Plan Book 192) for municipal purposes, 
and to fund this acquisition appropriate $1,115,000; and that to meet this appropriation 
$15,000 be raised on the 2001 tax levy and the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow $1,100,000 in accordance with the 
provisions of Paragraph (2) and/or (3), Section 7, Chapter 44 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into 
contracts with and to receive money from the state and/or federal government for said 
purposes; and that all appropriations authorized under this article be contingent upon 
approval of a, so-called, proposition 2 54 debt exclusion in accordance with Chapter 59, 
Section 21 C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

YES -304 NO -52 (9/25/00) 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter 
into an inter-municipal agreement on such terms and conditions as they determine to be 
in the Town's best interests to allow for the disposal of household hazardous wastes by 
Medfield residents at a centrally located household hazardous waste collection facility, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Hazardous Waste Coordinator & Superintendent of Public 
Works) 

It was so VOTED (9/25/00) MORE THAN 2/3 MAJORITY 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will appropriate a sum of money and determine in 
what manner said sum shall be raised to fund a settlement agreement resolving pending 
and threatened litigation between the present and former owners of the Wilkins Glen 
residential apartment complex and the Town based upon the property owners' claims of 
tax overpayments and property overvaluation, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors and Board of 
Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $150,000 and to meet said appropriation $150,000 
be raised on 2001 tax levy to fund a settlement agreement resolving pending and 
threatened litigation between the present and former owners of the Wilkins Glen 
residential apartment complex and the Town based upon the property owners' claims of 
tax overpayments and property overvaluation. (9/25/00) MORE THAN 2/3 

MAJORITY 



205 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $32.00 to pay an 
unpaid medical bill from fy98 for a former police officer injured in the line of duty in 
accordance with the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 64 and determine in what 
manner said sum shall be raised, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $32.00 to pay an unpaid medical bill from fy98 for 
a former police officer injured in the line of duty in accordance with the provisions of 
G.L. Chapter 44, Section 64; said sum to be raised on the 2001 tax levy. 
(9/25/00) BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission 
to enter into leases of portions of conservation land off Plain Street, identified on the 
Board of Assessor's maps as lots 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 Map 12 for periods not to exceed ten 
years, for agricultural and/or other conservation related uses, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

MOTION TO AMEND: Move that the Town authorize the Conservation Commission 
to lease a portion of conservation land off Plain Street, which is part of a parcel 
identified on the Board of Assessor's maps as lot 4, map 12 not to exceed 5 acres for a 
period not to exceed ten years, for agricultural use, namely the raising of sheep. 
(9/25/00) AMENDMENT PASSED 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Conservation Commission to lease a portion of 
conservation land off Plain Street, which is part of a parcel identified on the Board of 
Assessor's maps as lot 4, map 12 not to exceed 5 acres for a period not to exceed ten 
years, for agricultural use, namely the raising of sheep. (9/25/00) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BYLAW, ARTICLE II, ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE, SECTION 19. by deleting 
the existing SECTION 19. and substituting in place thereof the following: 

SECTION 19. Purchases of goods and services and contracts for professional services 
shall be administered in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 30B of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as may from time to time be amended. 

and by changing the numbering of ARTICLE IV - POLICE REGULATIONS, 
SECTION 30. Transfer Station Regulations to SECTION 31., or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

IT WAS SO VOTED: (9/25/00) BY UNANAMIOUS 



206 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to rescind $250 of a bond authorization 
voted in Article 1 of the October 28, 1996 Special Town Meeting and to rescind $89,730 
of a bond authorization voted in Article 10 of the October 28, 1996 Special Town 
Meeting, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Treasurer/Collector) 

VOTED: That the Town will vote to rescind $250 of a bond authorization voted in 
Article 1 of the October 28, 1996 Special Town Meeting and to rescind $89,730 of a 
bond authorization voted in Article 10 of the October 28, 1996 Special Town Meeting. 
(9/25/00) BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate an additional sum of money 
and determine in what manner said sum shall be raised to complete the construction of 
fields and related landscaping, drainage, electrical and security access gates at McCarthy 
Park, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate $24,000, said sum to be raised on the 2001 tax 
levy to complete the construction of fields and related landscaping, drainage, electrical 
and security access gates at McCarthy Park. (9/25/00) BY UNANIMOUS VOTE 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said Town Meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our hands 
this 29th day of August, Two Thousand. 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman S\ 
PaulB. RhudaS\ 
Osier L. Peterson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen days before the date 
of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable of Medfield: Dana P. Friend S\ 
Date: August 3 1 , 2000 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



207 



Springfield Massachusetts 

The forgoing amendments to the General By-Laws adopted under Article 7 of the 
warrant for the Medfield Special Town Meeting that convened on September 25, 2000, 
has been approved by the Attorney General's Office. 



THOMAS F REILLY 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



By: Kelli E. Lawrence S\ 
Assistant Attorney General 
October 27, 2000 



208 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

OCTOBER 23, 2000 

Norfolk, ss. 

To any of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield who are qualified to vote in Town elections to vote by ballot at the 
Memorial School in said Medfield on MONDAY, from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on the 
following question. 

PROPOSITION 2 Vi DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to 
acquire, all or a portion of the following parcels of land identified on the Town of 
Medfield Board of Assessor's maps as map 64, lots 1 and 86 (Norfolk County Registry 
of Deeds plan 1526 of 1954, Plan Book 192) 

YES NO 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given into our hands this 3 rd day 
of October, in the year Two Thousand. 

Ann B. Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date of 
the election, as within directed. 

Constable of Medfield: Dana P. Friend S\ 
Date: October 4, 2000 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



209 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

OCTOBER 23, 2000 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Dorothy Crump, Priscilla Anderson, Gale Rad, Jane Timmerman, Joan 
Bussow, Mae Maguire, Emmy Mitchell and Barbara Connors 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 611. There are 7,651 registered voters, 7% of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PROPOSITION 2 X A DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bond issued in order to 
acquire, all or a portion of the following parcels of land identified on the Town of 
Medfield Board of Assessor's maps as map 64, lots 1 and 86 (Norfolk County Registry 
of Deeds plan 1526 of 1954, Plan Book 192) 

PRECINCTS 

12 3 4 TOTAL 

YES 1 1 1 

NO 62 



40 


74 


83 


408 


56 


50 


35 


203 
611 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
October 24 , 2000 



210 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, SECRETARY 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 7, 2000 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections to vote at Precinct 1, 2, 3, 
4 at Memorial School on TUESDAY, THE SEVENTH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2000 
from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE PRESIDENT 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 
CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN THE GENERAL 
COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE 
GENERAL COURT 

CLERK OF COURTS 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
Ninth CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

Second DISTRICT 

NORFOLK, BRISTOL & 
PLYMOUTH DISTRICT 

Thirteenth NORFOLK 
DISTRICT 

NORFOLK COUNTY 

NORFOLK DISTRICT 

NORFOLK COUNTY 

QUESTIONS 



#1 - Earlier Redistricting for State Legislators and Governor's Councillors 

#2 - Voting by Incarcerated Felons 

#3 - Dog Racing 

#4 - Income Tax Rate Reduction 



211 



#5 - Health Insurance and Health Care 

#6 - Tax Credit for Tolls and Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

#7 - Tax Deduction for Charitable Contributions 

#8 - Drug-Dependence Treatment and Drug-Crime Fines and forfeitures 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings hereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Election aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 
1 7 lh day of October, two thousand. 

Ann Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date of 
the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Patrick Caulfield S\ 
Date: October 18,2000 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 



212 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, SECRETARY 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 7, 2000 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Gale Rad, John McGowan, Eric Iafolla, Priscilla Anderson, Joan Bussow, 
Ruth Chick, Phyllis Wilmarth, Mae Maguire, Emmy Mitchell, Barbara Connors, Patricia 
Rioux, Dorothy Crump, Kathly Lee, Jessie Portmann, Priscilla Batting, Barbara 
Reynolds, Irene O'Toole, Jane Timmerman and Angelo Allegretto 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 6,634. There are 7,782 registered voters, 86% of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE PRESIDENT (VOTE FOR ONE) 

Browne and Oliver 
Buchanan and Higgins, Sr. 
Bush and Cheney 
Gore and Lieberman 
Hagelin and Tompkins 
Nader and LaDuke 
Write In 
Blanks 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS (VOTE FOR 
ONE) 

Edward M. Kennedy 920 1289 1037 925 4171 

Carla A. Howell 231 298 234 275 1038 

Jack E. Robinson, III 175 250 204 242 871 

Dale E. Friedgen " 4 5 2 2 13 

Philip Hyde, III 3 5 2 2 12 

Philip F. Lawler 46 71 32 41 190 



213 





PRECINCT 






1 


2 


3 


4 


TOT. 


11 


10 


8 


13 


42 


3 


6 


3 


6 


18 


582 


891 


696 


702 


2871 


742 


975 


787 


726 


3230 


1 




5 




6 


90 


115 


92 


92 


389 


2 


10 


4 


10 


26 


14 


13 


16 


9 


52 
6634 



Write In 
Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 
(VOTE FOR ONE) 

John Joseph Moakley 
Janet E. Jeghelian 
David A. Rosa 
Write In 
Blanks 



2 
64 



2 
100 



99 71 



5 

334 

6634 



868 1181 952 850 3851 



474 


710 


547 


614 


2345 


30 


30 


27 


18 


105 


3 


2 






5 


70 


97 


85 


76 


328 
6634 



COUNCILLOR (VOTE FOR ONE) 

Kelly A. Timilty 
Write In 
Blanks 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
(VOTE FOR ONE) 

JoAnn Sprague 
James Timilty 
Write In 
Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL 
COURT (VOTE FOR ONE) 



985 1372 1084 1013 4454 

9 28 19 16 72 

451 620 508 529 2108 

6634 



777 1156 928 941 3802 

553 722 563 526 2364 

3 4 1 2 10 

112 138 119 89 458 

6634 



Lida E. Harkins (P 1 & 4) 


999 






1008 


2007 


Sean E. Rickert (P 1 & 4) 


342 






433 


775 


John H. Rogers (P 2 & 3) 




1432 


1106 




2538 


Write In 


3 


10 


17 


1 


31 


Blanks 


101 


578 


488 


116 


1283 



CLERK OF COURTS (VOTE 
FOR ONE) 

Daniel M. Dewey 
Walter F. Timilty, Jr. 
Write In 
Blanks 



6634 



530 810 642 657 2639 

640 854 652 594 2740 

3 12 17 

272 355 315 306 1248 



6634 



214 






REGISTER OF DEEDS (VOTE 

FOR ONE) 
Paul D. Harold 
Bruce Olsen 
Write In 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (VOTE 
FOR NOT MORE THAT TWO) 



608 859 651 545 2663 

532 794 623 677 2626 

13 15 

304 364 337 335 B40 

6634 



John M. Gillis 
William P. O'Donnell 
Write In 
Blanks 



668 914 719 698 2999 

701 979 760 740 3180 

7 7 6 9 29 

1514 2140 1737 1669 7060 

13268 











QUESTIONS 
















PRECINCT 






1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


#1 - Earlier Redistricting for State Legislators and Governor's Councillors 


YES 


1042 


1421 


1170 


1150 


4783 


NO 


321 


489 


354 


347 


1511 


Blanks 


82 


109 


88 


61 


340 
6634 


#2 - Voting by Incarcerated Felons 












YES 


993 


1399 


1138 


1085 


4615 


NO 


414 


556 


423 


435 


1828 


Blanks 


38 


65 


50 


38 


191 
6634 


#3 - Dog Racing 












YES 


678 


973 


1062 


726 


3439 


NO 


738 


988 


499 


802 


3027 


Blanks 


29 


59 


50 


30 


168 
6634 


#4 - Income Tax Rate Reduction 












YES 


928 


1333 


1068 


1061 


4390 


NO 


476 


630 


489 


463 


2058 


Blanks 


41 


57 


54 


34 


186 












6634 



215 



#5 - Health Insurance and Health Care 










YES 568 


825 


646 


627 


2666 


NO 820 


1121 


890 


873 


3704 


Blanks 57 


74 


75 


58 


264 
6634 


#6 - Tax Credit for Tolls and Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 








YES 667 


953 


743 


742 


3105 


NO 735 


1008 


813 


773 


3329 


Blanks 43 


58 


56 


43 


200 
6634 


#7 - Tax Deduction for Charitable Contributions 










YES 1114 


1596 


1265 


1240 


5215 


NO 286 


357 


282 


284 


1209 


Blanks 45 


67 


64 


34 


210 
6634 



#8 - Drug-Dependence Treatment and Drug-Crime Fines and forfeitures 
YES 651 954 734 758 3097 

NO 730 979 801 758 3268 

Blanks 64 87 76 42 269 

6634 
After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
November 15, 2000 



216 






TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WARRANT FOR NOVEMBER 15, 2000 SPECIAL TOWN 

MEETING 

Norfolk,ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 



In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury High School gymnasium, in said Medfield, on Wednesday, the 
fifteenth day of November, A.D., 2000, at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there to act on 
the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine 
how said sum shall be raised for the purpose of remodeling, reconstructing and 
constructing additions to the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School and the Thomas M. 
Blake Middle School, including but not limited to, associated architectural and 
construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment and related site improvements 
and for the purpose of building a new elementary school on property off Elm Street, 
where the Wheelock Elementary School is located, including but not limited to, 
associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment and 
related site improvements and to authorize the Treasurer/Collector, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, to borrow in accordance with the provisions of paragraphs (3) 
and/or (3 A), Section 7, Chapter 44 of the General Laws or Chapter 70B of the General 
Laws or any other enabling authority; and to authorize the Permanent School Planning 
and Building Committee and/or the School Committee to enter into contracts with 
federal, state and/or private parties and to accept grants or funds and to take any other 
action necessary to accomplish said purposes; provided, however, that this vote shall not 
take effect until the Town votes to exempt from the limitation on total taxes imposed by 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C (Proposition 2 54) amounts required to pay the 
principal of and interest on the borrowing authorized by this vote; or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 

(Permanent School Planning and Building Committee & School Committee) 

VOTED: That $57.4 million is appropriated for the purpose of remodeling, 
reconstructing and constructing additions to the Amos Clark Kingsbury High School and 
Thomas M. Blake Middle School, including but not limited to associated architectural 
and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment and related site 
improvements and for the purpose of building a new elementary school on property off 
Elm Street, where the Wheelock Elementary School is located, including bui not limited 



217 



to associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment 
and related site improvements; and that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow $57.4 million under Chapter 
44 of the General Laws or Chapter 70B of the General Laws or any other enabling 
authority; and that the Permanent School Planning and Building Committee and/or the 
School Committee are authorized to enter into contracts with federal, state and/or private 
parties and to accept grants or funds and to take any other action necessary to 
accomplish said purposes; provided, however, that this vote shall not take effect until the 
Town votes to exempt from the limitation on total taxes imposed by G.L. c59, 21C 
(Proposition 2 X A) amounts required to pay the principal of and interest on the borrowing 
authorized by this vote. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE 

YES -959 NO -432 11/15/2000 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the Water and Sewerage Board to enter into a ground lease with Medfield Shelter 2000, 
Inc., a non-profit corporation, for a period not to exceed thirty years for the purpose of 
building and operating a non-municipal animal shelter on such terms and conditions as 
the Board of Selectmen and/or the Water and Sewerage Board deems to be in the best 
interest of the Town of Medfield; and, if deemed necessary or desirable, to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to enact special legislation authorizing the Town of Medfield to enter into 
such a lease and/or to authorize the Town of Medfield to refund gifts and/or 
contributions previously made to the Town of Medfield for the purpose of constructing 
an animal shelter or transfer said funds to Medfield Shelter 2000, Inc. or another suitable 
public charity for that purpose, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



It was so VOTED UNANIMOUS 11/15/2000 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into 
negotiations with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the lease, sale or transfer to 
the Town of vacant land at Medfield State Hospital, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Park & Recreation Commission & Board of Selectmen) 
It was so VOTED UNANIMOUS 11/15/2000 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said Town Meeting. 



218 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our hands 
this 31 st day of October, Two Thousand. 

Ann B. Thompson, Chairman S\ 
Paul B. Rhuda S\ 
Osier L. Peterson S\ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen days before the date 
of the meeting as within directed. 



Constable of Medfield: Kevin W. Robinson S\ 
Date: November 1,2000 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
November 17,2000 



219 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

DECEMBER 5, 2000 



Norfolk, ss. 

To any of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield who are qualified to vote in Town elections to vote by ballot at the 
Memorial School in said Medfield on TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2000 , from 6:00 
a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on the following question. 

PROPOSITION 2 Yi DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 



Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued in order 
to finance remodeling, reconstructing and constructing additions to the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School and Thomas M. Blake Middle School, including but not limited 
to associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment 
and related site improvements and building a new elementary school on property off Elm 
Street, where the Wheelock Elementary School is located, including but not limited to 
associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment and 
related site improvements? 



YES NO 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given into our hands this 21st 
day of November, in the year Two Thousand. 



Ann B. Thompson S\ 
Paul Rhuda S\ 
Osier Peterson S\ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



220 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days before the date of 
the election, as within directed. 

Constable of Medfield: Richard D. Bishop S\ 
Date: November 22, 2000 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer 
Town Clerk 



221 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 

DECEMBER 5, 2000 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of 
the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: G. Marshall Chick 

TELLERS: Mary Salvatore, Eric Iafolla, Eva Grover, Priscilla Anderson, Joan Bussow, 
Ruth Chick, Betsy Dakin, Phyllis Wilmarth, Mae Maguire, Phyllis Scott, Dorothy 
Crump, Jessie Portmann, Barbara Reynolds, Jane Timmerman, Angelo Allegretto and 
Patricia Iafolla. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 3, 1 77. There are registered 7,8 1 voters, 40% of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 

PROPOSITION 2 Vi DEBT EXCLUSION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two 
and one-half, so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued in order 
to finance remodeling, reconstructing and constructing additions to the Amos Clark 
Kingsbury High School and Thomas M. Blake Middle School, including but not limited 
to associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment 
and related site improvements and building a new elementary school on property off Elm 
Street, where the Wheelock Elementary School is located, including but not limited to 
associated architectural and construction supervision costs, furnishings, equipment and 
related site improvements? 

YES NO 



YES 
NO 

3177 





PRECINCTS 




1 


2 


3 


4 


TOT, 


304 


500 


390 


375 


1569 


393 


523 


333 


359 


1608 



222 



After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer S\ 
TOWN CLERK 
December 6, 2000 



223 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1999 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 
1999,2000,2001 



1999 

1) Residential 3854 1,009,529,550.00 

2) Open Space 118 3,728,950.00 

3) Commercial 139 35,017,900.00 

4) Industrial 45 24,260,450.00 

5) Personal Property 179 12,919,270.00 
Total Real and Personal 4335 1,085,456,120.00 

Tax Levy 17,519,336.83 

Overlay 72,172.53 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 16.14 

2000 

1) Residential 3867 1,026,299,250.00 

2) Open Space 114 2,852,000.00 

3) Commercial 133 35,296,500.00 

4) Industrial 46 24,527,700.00 

5) Personal Property 169 13,078,620.00 
Total Real and Personal 4329 1,1 02,054,070.00 

Tax Levy 18,172,871.61 

Overlay 59,156.61 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 1 6.49 

2001 

1) Residential 3898 1,364,529,350.00 

2) Open Space 116 4,609,900.00 

3) Commercial 133 40,783,050.00 

4) Industrial 46 31,313,600.00 

5) Personal Property 205 14,522,624.00 
Total Real and Personal 4329 1,455,758,524.00 

Tax Levy 20,016,679.71 

Overlay 93,738.05 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 1 3.75 



225 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes receivable as of June 30, 1999 



Fiscal Year 



Real Estate 



2000 $184,097.08 

1999 22,757.58 

1998 488.31 

1997 & Prior 12,670.69 



TOTAL 



220,013.66 



Personal Property 
$2,405.33 
1,903.99 
2,400.91 

2,732.33 

9,442.56 



Excise Tax 
$43,241.03 

13,725.17 
6,974.68 

53,385.78 

117,326.66 



Tax Title 

Taxes In Litigation 



$163,492 
38,341 



Water Rates Receivable 
Sewer Rates Receivable 



$186,555.45 
$108,453.92 



ADDED TO TAXES: 

Septic 

Water & Sewer Liens 

Committed Interest 





4,901 

116 



Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas 
Tax Collector 



226 



TOWN TREASURER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal Year 2000- 
Including investment returns $40,789,760.34 

Disbursements Fiscal Year 2000- 
Including reinvestments 35,452,271.67 

Cash in Banks on June 30, 2000 $12,906,017.28 

STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Investments with MMDT June 30, 2000 2,762,374.37 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June 30, 2000 $15,668,391.65 

STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 
General Fund 574,353.55 

Pooled Investment Fund 133,638.71 

Total Interest received in Fiscal 2000 707,992.26 

OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 2000 
Debt Exclusion: 

Town Land Acquisition 710,000 

Sewers 8,624,811 

School Construction 6,465,000 

Library Renovation 1 ,740,000 

School Roofs 790,000 

AddT School Roofs 650,000 

Non-Exclusion: 

Fire Truck 245,000 

Town Hall Renovation 1 ,955,000 

Cap Landfill 695,000 

Athletic Facilities 170,000 

School Adm. Remodel 105,000 

Land Acquisitions 3 ,490,000 

Enterprise Fund: 

Well No. 6 1,290,000 

Water Treatment Plant 400,000 

Total Long Term Debt 27,329,8 1 1 

Total Short Term Debt (BAN) 135,000 

Total Long and Short Term Debt 27,464,8 1 1 



227 



TOWN TREASURER 
TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Funds in Custody of the Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $2,292,2 1 9.85 

Conservation 105,673.22 

Stabilization 262,741.77 

Special Unemployment Insurance 216,270.60 

Group Insurance 90,207.26 

Library Trusts 13,637.54 

Granville Dailey-Library 77,826.06 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 41,016.65 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 533,038.33 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 1 1 ,950.59 

Municipal Insurance 220, 118.30 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 1 1 7,057.89 

Council on Aging 1 ,749.39 

Palumbo Sports Fund 52 1 .24 

Pilgrim Health Care Fund 67,549.35 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 8,497.44 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 3,710.60 

Tri-Centennial Trust 2,373.52 

School Essay Fund 3,894.49 

Allendale Sewer Pumping Station Fund 9,092.69 

Dela Park Acres Trust 13,391.48 

Cedarview Acres 1 2,727. 1 4 

Carruth Sewer District 12,772.86 

Maude Washburn Trust Fund 2,709.33 

Playground Trust 7,191 .74 



Balance June 30, 2000 $ 4,167,939.33 



Respectfully submitted, 



Georgia K. Colivas 
Treasurer/Collector 



228 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2000 



GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 



ASSETS 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 



101000 
119093 
121000 
121097 
121098 
121099 
122000 
122091 
122092 
122093 
122094 
122095 
122096 
122097 
122098 
122099 
123000 
123095 
123096 
123097 
123098 
123099 
124000 
125300 
125400 
126097 
126098 
126099 
126100 
129000 
134000 
135000 
136000 
137000 
138000 
143000 
143096 
143097 
143098 
143099 
143100 
143900 
143910 
143915 
161010 
161020 
161021 
161030 



CASH 

PY19 96 MVE TAX RECEIVABLE 
2 00 PERSONAL PROP TAX RBC 
19 97 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 
19 9 8 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 
1999 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 
2 00 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
1991 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
19 92 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
19 9 3 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
19 94 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
19 9 5 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
19 96 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
1997 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
19 98 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
199 9 REAL ESTATE TAX REC 
PROV. FOR ABATE. /EXEMPT. -2000 
PROV. FOR ABATE. /EXEMPT. -1995 
PROV. FOR ABATE. /EXEMPT. -19 96 
PROV. FOR ABATE. /EXEMPT. -19 97 
PROV. FOR ABATE. /EXEMPT. -1998 
PROV. FOR ABATE. /EXEMPT. -19 9 9 
TAX TITLE/LIENS RECEIVABLE 
DEFERRED TAXES RECEIVABLE 
TAXES IN LITIGATION RECEIVABLE 

1997 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 
19 9 8 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 

1999 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE RECB 

2000 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE REC 
2000 FORESTRY TAX RECEIVABLE 
AMBULANCE CHARGES RECEIVABLE 
AMBULANCE MILEAGE RECEIVABLE 
POLICE SPECIAL DETAIL RECBLE 
ADV LIFE SUPPORT RECEIVABLE 
COMMERCIAL TRASH FEE RECBLE 
COMMITTED INTEREST WATER 

19 96 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 
19 97 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 

1998 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 
19 9 9 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 
2000 APP SEWER BETT ADD TAX 
COMMITTED INTEREST SEWER 

COMM INT APP SEWER BETT PD ADV 
APP SEWER BETTERMENT PD ADV 
CHERRY SHEET -NON RECURRING REC 
DUE FROM SPECIAL REV FUND -20 
DUE FROM SPECIAL REV FUND- 21 
DUE FROM SPECIAL REV FUND- 3 



15,704 
48 
2 
2 
2 
1 
177 



22 

-24 

-37 

-3 

-13 

-62 

-40 

163 

40 

38 

5 

6 

13 

43 

97 

59 

129 

9 



, 978. 91 

, 034. 97 

,405.33 

,732.33 

,400. 91 

, 903 . 99 

,646.82 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.00 

.00 

,670.69 

488.31 

,757.58 

,654.07 

,706.12 

,325.85 

,659.13 

,056.89 

,699.32 

,492.30 

,631.12 

,341.07 

,350.81 

,974.68 

,725.17 

,241. 03 

.00 

,034.79 

,712.72 

,812.45 

,675.09 

396.50 

,169.98 

.00 

116.95 

.00 

.00 

251.50 

,477.32 

-1.01 

-23.19 

,751.00 

.00 

.00 

.00 



229 



GENERAL rUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 



01 


161031 


01 


161032 


01 


161050 


01 


161060 


01 


161080 


01 


199200 


01 


199300 



DUE PROM SPEC REVENUE FUND- 31 .00 

DUE FROM SPECIAL REVENUE ED- 32 .00 

DF W 4 S PRIOR TO ENT - 50 .00 

DUE FROM W & S ENTERPRISE - 60 .00 

DUE FROM TRUST FUND- 80 49,343.65 

AMT/PROV FOR ACCRUED SICK & VA 814,803.25 

AMT/PROV FOR BAN RETIREMENT 135,000.00 

17,414,195.64 



TOTAL ASSETS 



LIABILITIES 




01 


120000 


01 


124001 


01 


125301 


01 


125401 


01 


126000 


01 


134100 


01 


135100 


01 


136100 


01 


137100 


01 


138100 


01 


143925 


01 


144000 


01 


201000 


01 


221100 


01 


221200 


01 


222000 


01 


222115 


01 


222200 


01 


222500 


01 


222600 


01 


222800 


01 


223000 


01 


223100 


01 


225100 


01 


225200 


01 


225500 


01 


226600 


01 


226800 


01 


227000 


01 


238020 


01 


238021 


01 


238030 


01 


238031 


01 


238032 


01 


238033 


01 


238050 


01 


238060 



DEFERRED/UNCOLLECTED TAXES 
DEFERRED/UNCOLLECTED TAX LIENS 
DEFERRED FOR DEFERRED TAXES 
DEFERRED LITIGATION TAXES 
DEFERRED/UNCOLL MVE TAX 
DEFERRED/UNC AMBULANCE CHARGES 
DEFERRED/UNCOLL AMB MILEAGE 
DEFERRED POLICE SPECIAL DETAIL 
DEFERRED ADV LIFE SUPPORT 
DEFERRED COMM TRASH FEES 
DEFERRED/UNC SPECIAL BETTERMEN 
DEFERRED CHERRY SH NON-RECURRG 
WARRANTS PAYABLE 
FED INC TAX W/H PAYABLE 
STATE INC TAX W/H PAYABLE 
RETIREMENT W/H FROM PAY 
ACCRUED SICK/VACA LEAVE 
VOLUNTARY LIFE INSURANCE PAY 
ANNUITY W/H PAYABLE 
DEFERRED COMPENSATION W/H PAY 
MEDICARE W/H PAYABLE 
HEALTH INSURANCE W/H PAYABLE 
LIFE INSURANCE W/H PAYABLE 
CUSTODIAN UNION DUES W/H DUES 
SECRETARY UNION DUES W/H PAYAB 
CAFETERIA UNION DUES W/H PAYAB 
CHILD SUPPORT W/H PAYABLE 
DENTAL INSURANCE W/H PAYABLE 
BAN PAYABLE 

DUE TO SPEC REV FUND- 2 
DUE TO SPEC REVENUE FUND- 21 
DUE TO SPEC REV FUND- 3 
DUE TO SPEC REVENUE FUND- 31 
DUE TO SPECIAL REVENUE FD-3 2 
DUE TO SPEC REV FUND- 3 3 
DT W & S PRIOR TO ENT - 5 
DUE TO W & S ENTERPRISE - 6 



-223, 


005. 


96 


-163, 


492. 


30 


-40, 


631. 


12 


-38, 


341. 


07 


-117, 


326. 


66 


-97, 


034. 


79 


-59, 


712. 


72 


-129, 


812. 


45 


-9, 


675. 


09 




■396, 


50 


-8, 


991. 


55 


-3, 


751, 


00 


-234, 


919 


68 
,17 
,10 


-204, 


,093 


.75 


-814, 


,803 


.25 


-3, 


,072 


.87 


-122, 


,655 


.87 
.06 


1, 


,476 


.24 


49 


,409 


.03 


-20 


,554 


.24 




-1 


.25 
.10 




- 


.02 




-70 


. 00 


-7 


,806 


.57 


-135 


,000 


. 00 


-82 


,791 


.69 


-251 


,022 


.84 


-146 


,178 


.71 


1,502 


,615 


.32 


-295 


,889 


.30 


158 


,872 


.00 
. 00 


7,793 


,340 


.28 



230 



Town of Medfield 
Fund 20 Detail 

Fiscal Year 2QQQ 



Account 
Number 

20-004 
20-005 
20-007 
20-008 
20-009 
20-011 
20-012 
20-013 
20-014 
20-015 
20-020 
20-025 
20-027 
20-029 
20-030 
20-031 



Account Title 

Community Partnership Grant 

Drug Free School Grant 

Title VIB-Early Childhood 

Title VIB-941 142 

Dwight Eisenhower Grant 

TEC Metrowest HS Alliant Grant 

Paul Newman Assoc Grant 

Lighthouse Grant 

SPED Supporting Access to Curr 

Health Education Grant 

DOE-FY98 Foundation Dollars 

Tn-County School To Career Ptship 

Best Technical Practices 

Gifted &Talented Grant 

Wisconsin Fast Plant Grant 

IEP Training Grant 

Total For Fund 20 



•■Od "MC>> '?jr«?Y payCK !XJ n _ u n .n . 



Actual Total for Fund 20 (3) 5/30/00 



Balance 6/30/00 



s 
s 
s 
s 


3.974 04 
861.96 
275.00 

3.160.87 


s 


394 08 


s 


771 81 


s 


41.10 


s 


7.240.62 


s 


4.588 80 


s 
s 


(1.778.08) 
27,61657 


s 
s 


4.314.95 
19.522.52 


s 

s 

5 


16947 
8.937 98 
2.700 00 


5 


82.791 59 


s 

s 


82.791 69 
1.778 08 


3 


84.569 77 



Fund 21 Detail 
Fisca l Ye a r 2 QQQ 



Account 

Number Account Title 

21-001 School Lunch 

21-003 School Athletic Revolving 

21-004 Adult Education 

21-005 Capital Improvement 

21-006 Tuition Revolving 

21-007 Fine Arts revolving 

21-008 Custodian Detail Revolving 

21-012 Voluntary Local Education 

21-015 Summer Enrichment Program 

21-016 School Intramurals 

21-017 Substitute Teachers 

21-019 Middle School Interscholastic 

Total for Fund 21 



Balance 



6/30/00 



s 


172.809 09 


s 


12.31666 


s 


36.161 66 


s 


2.454.00 


$ 


6.266 80 


s 


3.567 80 


$ 


3.812.91 


s 


2,986 00 


s 


46 13 


$ 


10.092.49 


s 


84.27 


$ 


42500 


s 


251.022 81 



231 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 30 Detail 

Fiscal Year 2000 



Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 




S/3Q/QQ 


30-001 


COA-Outreach Worker 


$ 


890.68 


30-006 


Police Drug Education 


$ 


764.70 


30-008 


Youth Advisory 


$ 


88.86 


30-012 


Hazardous Waste Coll 


$ 


1,000.00 


30-013 


Dep Compost Bin 


$ 


1,967.30 


30-015 


Police Vests 


$ 


326.25 


30-016 


Library Building Grant 


$ 


37,644.21 


30-017 


Law Enforcement Block Grant 


$ 


108.26 


30-020 


Title V Public Info. Gr. 


$ 


4,381.46 


30-021 


Seniors Grant 


$ 


34.67 


30-022 


Election/Extended Polling Gr. 


$ 


2.25 


30-023 


Medfield Cultural Council 


$ 


7,099.69 


30-024 


State Aid to Library 


$ 


46,380.08 


30-025 


Federal Ambulance Grant 


$ 


507.76 


30-028 


Community Policing FY98 


$ 


1,585.87 


30-029 


FY 98 Recycling Grant 


$ 


8,810.75 


30-031 


FY 99 Police DARE Grant 


$ 


66.15 


30-032 


Community Policing Radio 


$ 


639.00 


30-033 


Community Policing FY 99 


$ 


3,839.24 


30-034 


Water Pollution Abatement 


$ 


10,454.00 


30-035 


Community Policing FY 2000 


$ 


16,560.29 


30-036 


DARE FY 2000 


$ 


621.79 


30-038 


Senior FY 2000 Formula Grant 


S 


2,529.29 




Total For Fund 30 


$ 


146,302.55 



232 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 31 Detail 

Fiscal Year 2000 



Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 




6/30/00 


31-001 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 


S 


12,860.00 


31-002 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


s 


10.990.00 


31-003 


Insurance Reimb <S20,000 


s 


2,091.85 


31-004 


Park & Recreation Revolving 


s 


4,856.36 


31-005 


Tennis Revolving 


s 


6,847.23 


31-006 


Swim Pond revolving 


$ 


7,636.32 


31-007 


Fire Alarm Revolving 


s 


11,897.02 


31-008 


Kennel Fee Revolving 


s 


105,855.87 


31-011 


Pilgrim Self Insured Insurance 


s 


1,054,176.94 


31-012 


Fire CPR Revolving 


s 


1.066.53 


31-013 


Georgetown Roadwork 


s 


3.000.00 


31-014 


Tax Refund IRS 


s 


1,871.74 


31-015 


Project & Plans 


s 


67.86 


31-016 


Backflow Fees 


s 


8.103.00 


31-017 


Special Investigation Police 


s 


1,073.50 


31-018 


Fire Revolving 


s 


5.98 


31-019 


Theatre Revolving 


s 


1,085.95 


31-021 


West Mill Street Restoration 


s 


5,500.00 


31-022 


Police Special Detail 


s 


39,193.05 


31-024 


Conservation Fees 


s 


19,645.49 


31-025 


Novus fees 


s 


0.61 


31-026 


Adv Life Support Fees Ambulanc 


s 


6.770.43 


31-027 


Historical Commission Fees 


s 


85.00 


31-028 


Ambulance Mileage Fees Revolg 


s 


42.774.39 


31-029 


Add'l Chap 90 funds 


s 


43.493.18 


31-030 


Ambulance Detail 


s 


(224.27) 


31-031 


Cemetery Grave Openings 


s 


60,677.50 


31-033 


Town Hall renv Bonding Company 


$ 


60,810.24 


31-036 


Fire Arms Revolving 


s 


2.167.60 


31-037 


Payroll Withholding/Retirement 


$ 


(11,844.05) 




Total For Fund 31 


s 


1.502.535.32 






s 


1,502.535.32 




add back 8/1 1/00 cash receipt 


5 


11.844.05 




Adjusted Total for Fund 31 


s 


1.514,379.37 



(60 aay rute) 



233 





Town of Medfield 








Fund 32 Detail 








Fiscal Year 2000 






Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 

Cable Access Gift 




6/30/00 


32-001 


$ 


100.00 


32-002 


Fire Gift 


$ 


3,479.00 


32-003 


Dwight Derby House Gift 


$ 


1,000.00 


32-004 


Civil Defense gift 


$ 


3,442.62 


32-006 


Copeland Gift Police 


$ 


11,981.41 


32-007 


School/Police Safety Gift 


$ 


164.20 


32-008 


Council on Aging Gift 


$ 


2,614.61 


32-010 


Brook Run Development Gift 


$ 


43,000.00 


32-011 


Pondview Sidewalk gift 


$ 


193.87 


32-013 


Drug Wages Norwood Gift 


$ 


742.46 


32-014 


Historical Commission Gift 


$ 


34.00 


32-015 


Long Range Planning Gift 


S 


447.00 


32-016 


Comm to Study Memorials Gift 


$ 


101,934.70 


32-017 


Maodac Gift 


s 


31.94 


32-018 


Memorial Day Gift 


$ 


2,963.77 


32-019 


Hazardous Waste Gift 


$ 


3,434.09 


32-020 


Outreach Gift 


$ 


604.50 


32-021 


Miscellaneous Gift 


$ 


1,488.02 


32-022 


Park & Recreation Gift 


$ 


2.369.68 


32-023 


Corning Best Way Gift 


$ 


569.80 


32-025 


Town Meeting Gift 


s 


75.00 


32-026 


Selectmen's Gift 


$ 


1,398.96 


32-027 


Ambulance Gift 


$ 


5,715.51 


32-028 


Library Gift 


$ 


31,364.71 


32-030 


Grist Mill Gift 


$ 


4,899.86 


32-031 


Town Common Gift 


s 


2,531.06 


32-032 


Conservation Gift 


$ 


1,011.04 


32-033 


Gallery Gift 


$ 


5.95 


32-034 


Library Building Gift 


s 


39,214.01 


32-035 


Dare Police Donations 


$ 


2,122.58 


32-037 


350th Anniv Gifts/Donations 


s 


5,954.75 




Total Town 


$ 


274,890.10 




School 






32-005 


Computer Gift Program-School 


$ 


20,747.25 


32-029 


MCCA Gift 


$ 


251.95 




Total School 


$ 


20,999.20 




Total For Fund 32 


$ 


295,889.30 



234 





Fund 33 Detail 






Chapter 90 






Fiscal Year 2000 




Account 




Balance 


Number 


Account Title 


6/30/00 


33-001 


Chapter 90-South St Resurfacing $ 


(158.872) 



Total For Fund 33 



(158.872) 







$ 


(158,872) 




add back 7/00 receipt 


S 


158.872 (60 day rule) 




Adjusted Total for Fund 33 


S 






Fund 80 Detail 








Trust Funds 








Fiscal Year 2000 






Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust 




6/30/00 


80-001 


s 


195,985.15 


80-002 


Unemployment Comp Trust 


$ 


216,270.60 


80-003 


Conservation Trust Fund 


s 


105.673.22 


80-004 


Library Trust Fund 


s 


13,637.54 


80-005 


Pension Trust Fund 


s 


2,292,219.85 


80-006 


Stabilization Trust Fund 


$ 


262,741.77 


80-007 


Health Claim Group Ins Trust 


$ 


90,207.26 


80-008 


Municipal Building Ins Trust 


$ 


220,118.30 


80-009 


Palumbo Trust Fund-Expendbl 


$ 


521.24 


80-010 


Glona G. Lynn Trust-Expendable 


s 


11,950.59 


80-01 1 


Council On Ageing Trust-Expend 


$ 


1,749.39 


80-012 


Pilgrim Health Trust Expendable 


s 


67,549.35 


80-013 


Allendale Sewer Trust Expendbl 


s 


49.092.69 


80-014 


Dela Park Acres Expendable 


$ 


13.391.48 


80-015 


Carruth Sewer Trust Expendable 


s 


12.772.86 


80-016 


Cedarview Acres Trust Expendbl 


$ 


12,727.14 


80-017 


Cemetery Perp Care Interest 


$ 


337,053.18 


80-018 


Granville Daily Trust 


s 


77,826.06 


80-019 


Essay Trust Fund 


s 


3,894.49 


80-020 


Tri-Centennial Trust Fund 


$ 


2,373.52 


80-021 


Antiquities Trust-Non Expendbl 


$ 


3,710.60 


80-022 


Mad Grant Scholar Trust-Non Ex 


$ 


117.057.89 


80-023 


Moses Ellis Gar Trust-Non Exp 


s 


8,497.44 


80-024 


M. Washburn Trust-Non Expend 


$ 


2.709.33 


80-025 


Playground Trust-Park & Rec 


s 


7,191.74 


80-026 


Madelyn Grant Library Trust Fnd 


$ 


41,016.65 




Total For Trust Fund 80 


5 


4,167.939.33 



Respecfully submitted, 

Joy A. Ricciuto 
Town Accountant 



235 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND FISCAL YEAR 2000 
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENSES 



WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 

TOTAL WATER REVENUES 



924,687 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED: 

COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 60^10-1 AND 60-410-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 190,610 

OPERATIONS $ 334,965 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: S 66,000 

PICKUP TRUCK 28,000 

SUPERINTENDENTS VEHICLE 12,000 
HAND HELD METER EQUIPMENT 22,000 
METER OFFICE EQUIPMENT 4,000 

SUB-TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT $ 591,575 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 105,000 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 85.198 



SUB-TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 



ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 

DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 

INSURANCE 01-945-2 $ 23,455 

PENSIONS 01-911-2 $ 29,761 

SHARED EMPLOYEES $ 84,262 

SHARED FACILITIES $ 5,436 



SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 



$ 142,914 



ESTIMATED EXPENSES 



924,687 



ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 



$ 924,687 
$ (924,687) 
$ 



GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN 

THE ENTERPRISE FUND: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
TAXATION 
FREE CASH 
NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 



TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE ENTERPRISE FUND 



924,687 



======== 



WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE FALL 1999: 
MINIMUM (FOR 6 MONTHS) S15.00 
0-35,000 GALLONS $1.44/1,000 GALLONS 

> 35,000 - 70,000 GALLONS $2.40/1 ,000 GALLONS 
OVER 70,000 GALLONS $3.30/1,000 GALLONS 

WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE SPRING 2000: 
MINIMUM (FOR 6 MONTHS) $20.00 
0-35,000 GALLONS $1.70/1,000 GALLONS 

> 35,000 - 70,000 GALLONS $2.70/1.000 GALLONS 
OVER 70.000 GALLONS $3.70/1,000 GALLONS 



236 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND FISCAL YEAR 2000 
ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENSES 

SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 

TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED: 

COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 60-420-1 AND 60-420-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 

OPERATIONS $ 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: $ 

PICK-UP TRUCK $26,000 

SUPERINTENDENT'S VEHICLE $12,000 



169,954 

324,536 

38,000 



SUB-TOTAL SEWER DEPARTMENT 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 
INTEREST 01-751-2 

SUB-TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 



532,490 



ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 

INSURANCE 01-945-2 

PENSIONS 01-911-2 

SHARED EMPLOYEES 

SHARED FACILITIES 

SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 



s 


22,187 


s 


33,406 


s 


84,262 


s 


3,753 



143,608 



ESTIMATED EXPENSES 



ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 



676,098 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 



676,098 
(676,098) 



GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN 

THE ENTERPRISE FUND: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
TAXATION 
FREE CASH 
NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 



676,098 



TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE ENTERPRISE FUND 



676,098 



SEWER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 

HOUSEHOLD: 75% OF WATER CONSUMPTION AT $3.70/1 ,000 GALLONS 
COMMERCIAL: 100% OF WATER CONSUMPTION AT $3.70/1,000 GALLONS 
SEPTIC DISPOSAL FEE: $110.00 PER THOUS. GALLONS 



237 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

ESTABLISHED JULY, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) 

UNDER MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS 

CHAPTER 40, SECTION 39K 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2000 



Water 

Total Services 3,763 

Added Services 33 

Thousand Gallons Pumped 429,068,963 

Thousand Gallons Sold 421,758,463 

Water Retained Earnings -Reserved $1,1 29,898 

Water Retained Earnings -Unreserved $ 188,743 



Sewer 

Total Services 1,603 

Added Services 100 

Water Retained Earnings -Reserved $ 5510443 

Water Retained Earnings -Unreserved $ 959,956 



238 



PERPETUAL CARE 



John and Elaine Spaulding $ 850 

Thomas and Catherine O'Neil 1 ,700 

Barbara Astle 1,700 

Leo and Gay Holderried 850 

Joyce and Robert Reeves 1 ,700 

Gary and Joan Miner 400 

Deborah and Daniel Jones 850 

James and Lillian Imbert 1 ,700 

Gretchen and Douglas Woodruff 1 ,700 

Kris Magnussen 850 

Catherine and Mark Breen 850 

Thomas and Gretta Clark 1 ,700 

Albert and Lorrie Manganello 1 ,700 

Peter Scribner 425 

Veronica Panciocco 850 

Alan and Dorothy Rother 1 ,700 

Kristin Kingsbury 425 

Anne and Stanley Minnaert 1 ,700 

Lucy and Gordon Jackson 425 



$22,075.00 



239 



INDEX 



Elected Town Officers 



Appointments By 

Assessors, Board of 1 5 

Health, Board of 16 

Fire Chief 16 

Selectmen, Board of 9 

Moderator 1 6 

Planning Board 16 

Town Accountant 1 5 

Town Clerk 15 

Treasurer/Collector 15 

Warrant Committee 1 6 

School Committee 16 

Town Department Reports 

Aging, Council on 84 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 38 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 3 1 

Cemetery Commission 49 

Conservation Commission 50 

Fire Department 40 

Health, Board of 74 

Historical Commission 55 

Historic District Commission 58 

Housing Authority 82 

Inspection Department 44 

Library Trustees 67 

Memorials, Committee to Study 69 

Memorial Public Library 65 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 94 

Norfolk County Commissioners 88 

Norfolk County Mosquito Control 90 

Open Space Committee 53 

Parks and Recreation Commission 92 

Planning Board 29 

Police Department 35 

Public Works Department 24 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 48 

Selectmen, Board of 20 

350 th Anniversary Committee 62 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 91 



240 



Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 96 

Veteran's Services 71 

Water and Sewerage Board 27 

School Department Reports 

School Committee 103 

Superintendent of Schools 1 09 

Director of Finance and Operations 1 28 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 1 3 1 

Graduation Exercises, High School 133 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 1 39 

Dale Street School 142 

Ralph Wheelock School 1 45 

Memorial School 148 

Pupil Services Department 151 

Athletic Director 154 

Community Education Program 161 

Town Clerk's Records 

Marriages 163 

Deaths 165 

Births 166 

Town Meetings and Elections 

Warrant for Presidential Primary 168 

Presidential Primary, March 7, 2000 1 70 

Annual Town Election, March 27, 2000 1 73 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting, April 24, 2000 1 76 

State Primary, September 1 9, 2000 1 98 

Special Town Meeting, September 25, 2000 204 

Special Town Election, October 23, 2000 209 

State Election, November 7, 2000 2 1 1 

Special Town Election, November 15, 2000 2 1 7 

Special Town Election, December 5, 2000 220 



Financial Reports 

Assessors, Board of 225 

Collector of Taxes 226 

Perpetual Care 239 

Town Accountant 229 

Treasurer 227 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds 237 



241 



MEDFIELD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




L A 

Lawrence E. Abar 

1968-1972 




L J 
R. Edward Beard 

1975-1981 




Austin C. Buchanan 

1959-1968 




L" ' ' A 

Herbert B. Burr 

1955-1958 





L A 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. 

1981-1985 



L A 

Richard G. Connors 

1964-1967 




Richard P. DeSorgher 

1980-1983 




L *_ —^ 

Arthur J. Farrar 

1973-1976 




Walter M. Frank 

1967-1970 




L A 

Robert H. Fraser 

1941-1943 




L*— A 

John F. Ganley 

1990-1993 




L A 

Charles W. Haigh 

1934-1937 1940- 

1946 




L ^ j 

Frank G. Haley 

1927-1954 




k> »j 

John T. Harney 
1994-Present 




L •—— | 

Tidal B. Henry 

1993-1996 




L A 

Harry A. Kelleher 

1968-1977 




Weston (;. Kosti 
1970-1973 




L - A 

Robert ,1. Larkin 

1 98 1- 1 990 




v ___ j 

Joseph L. Marcionette 
1 047- 1 964 1971-1975 




k" "" J 

William K. McC arth\ 
1946-1955 




k' — <J 

Sandra (;. Munsey 

! 077- 1980 




kr— —j 

William F. Nourse 

1985-1988 




k —J 

Edward R. Perry 

1963-1966 




^ j 

Harold K. Priloni, Jr. 
1988-1994 




k— — J 

Clarenee A. Purvis 

1 996- 1 999 




k ~J 

William R. Reagan 

1976-1981 




k- "A 

Paul B. Rhuda 
1999- Present 




Joseph A. Roberts 
1954-1963 




k • ■ P TJ 

Ann B. Thompson 

1983-Present